Month: September 2010

Virginia Beach, Virginia

A- Overview:
Located on the Atlantic Ocean and Chesapeake Bay, Virginia Beach borders North Carolina and ranks as the largest city in Virginia.

This major East Coast resort city welcomes college students and other travelers with a scenic boardwalk bustling with ice-cream shops, fast-food outlets, nightclubs, and places to rent water-sports equipment. There are excellent beaches north of town and thousands of hotel and motel rooms to suit every budget.

Visit the landing site where the first colonists touched shore, enjoy an IMAX theatre presentation, explore a nature trail and hundreds of interactive exhibits at the Virginia Marine Science Museum, and experience various marine habitats. In winter, the museum organizes trips to see the humpback whales that congregate off the coast.

Nearby, Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge and First Landing State Park are excellent places to ride bicycles, observe the migrating waterfowl, and explore coastal dunes.

On April 26th 1607 Admiral Christopher Newport set a landing party ashore at the present site of Virginia Beach. Fearing the area was too susceptible to attack from the native people and the Spanish, Admiral Newport chose a small island on the James River (Jamestown) on which to establish the first permanent English Colony in the new world. Fourteen years later, some of the colonists returned to the original landing site and settled in the area that is now Virginia Beach.

Abundant fishing and fertile soil assured the area’s success. In the late 1800s, Virginia Beach developed as a resort following construction of a hotel and a railroad linking it with Norfolk. After World War I it became an important base in the national coastal-defense system and today is home to Little Creek Naval Amphibious Base, Oceana Naval Air Station, and Fleet Combat Direction Systems Warfare Training Center at Dam Neck.

With its excellent beaches and many fine hotels, Virginia Beach is one of the most popular resort destinations on the east coast and one of the fastest growing cities in the United States.

B- City Information:

Population : 433,934

Elevation: 15 feet

County: Virginia Beach

Land area: 248.3 square miles

Time Zone: Eastern Standard Time Zone

Average weather in Virginia Beach, Virginia
Based on data reported by over 4,000 weather stations

Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

Average temp. (°F)
40.2
42.1
49.0
57.4
66.1
74.4
79.0
77.4
72.2
61.3
52.4
44.3

High temperature (°F)
48.1
50.6
57.9
67.0
74.7
82.7
86.7
84.8
79.5
69.6
61.1
52.5

Low temperature (°F)
32.2
33.6
40.0
47.7
57.4
66.1
71.3
70.0
64.9
53.0
43.7
36.2

Precipitation (in)
4.0
3.4
4.1
3.3
3.8
3.7
5.0
4.9
4.2
3.5
3.0
3.1

Normal climate around Virginia Beach, Virginia
Based on data reported by main weather stations

Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

Days with precipitation
11
10
11
10
10
9
11
10
8
7
8
9

Wind speed (mph)
11.4
11.8
12.3
11.8
10.4
9.7
8.9
8.8
9.6
10.2
10.3
10.9

Morning humidity (%)
75
75
74
74
77
79
81
84
84
83
79
76

Afternoon humidity (%)
59
57
54
51
56
57
59
61
61
59
57
59

Sunshine (%)
53
56
60
63
62
67
62
62
61
59
56
54

Days clear of clouds
9
8
9
9
8
7
7
8
9
12
10
9

Partly cloudy days
7
6
8
9
10
12
12
12
9
7
8
7

Cloudy days
16
14
15
12
13
11
12
11
11
12
12
15

Snowfall (in)
3.0
2.9
1.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.9

Climate :
Ocean breezes moderate the humidity and make for a mild climate in Virginia Beach. Air temperatures range from 40 Degrees in the winter to 80 in the summer. Spring and fall shorten winter(with an average snowfall of 8 inches) and drift into Summer (average July/ August temperatures 78 Degrees F)

Getting Around
Once in Virginia Beach, enjoy the convenience and fun of the trolley service from 2nd Street to 42nd Street on Atlantic Avenue; 19th Street and Pacific Ave. South on General Booth Boulevard; Lynnhaven Mall via the 44 Expressway; The Entertainment Express runs until 2.30am to all the major nightspots.

Tidewater Regional Transit (TRT) provides area bus transportation. Call (757) 640-6300 for information on routes, schedules and fares

By Car
All roads lead to Virginia Beach. When approaching from the west, the easiest routes are Interstate 64, U.S. 460 or U.S. 58. From the north and south, convenient routes are Interstates 85 or 95, U.S. 17 and U.S. 13 (crossing the world-famous Chesapeake Bay-Bridge Tunnel, a 17-mile span connecting Virginia’s Eastern Shore with Virginia Beach). These routes intersect with Interstate 64, which connects with the Virginia Beach-Norfolk Expressway, Interstate 264, and leads directly to the Virginia Beach oceanfront.

Alternate Driving Routes
Travelers driving to Virginia Beach can avoid the tension of driving and relax right away, thanks to the many routes leading to the resort city. Rather than the traditional and trafficked Interstate 64, explore the breathtaking scenery, wildlife and historical monuments found along routes 13, 17, 60 and I-664 in Virginia.

Route 13 For a truly picturesque drive from the north, consider Route 13 – a scenic stretch of open road through Virginia’s eastern shore. A trip through Cape Charles offers a look at some of Virginia’s most untouched nature, as tall trees and grasses line the highway and sea gulls glide in the sky.

Route 17 Another alternative route to Virginia Beach from the north is Route 17, leading drivers through the heartland of Virginia. Historic towns like Fredericksburg and Yorktown dot Route 17, ensuring visitors a healthy dose of American history while on their way to the beach resort.

Route 60 Route 17 also affords travelers the opportunity to connect with Route 60, and experience yet more American history with a stop at Colonial Williamsburg or the 1607 Jamestown Settlement. Williamsburg, in addition to the historical attractions, boasts unique shopping experiences and theme parks, such as Busch Gardens and Water Country USA.

Route 460 Visitors also can travel Route 460 through the Virginia countryside, through Petersburg and Lynchburg, to stop and explore the Civil War monuments.

Interstate 664 Those eager to get to the beach as soon as possible – and, who can blame them – can pick up Interstate 664 in Newport News and experience Hampton Roads’ other bridge-tunnel, the Monitor-Merrimac Memorial Bridge Tunnel. Interstate 664 connects with Interstate 264 in Portsmouth, just minutes from the Virginia Beach oceanfront.

By Air
Virginia Beach is served by Norfolk International Airport and the Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport. The airport is a quick 20-minute ride from the oceanfront, is serviced by almost every major U.S. carrier and offers close to 200 flights daily.

By Train
An Amtrak train connection is available in Newport News, a neighboring city to Virginia Beach. Amtrak bus service is available between the train station and 19th Street and Pacific Avenue. Reservations are required. Call Amtrak at 800-USA-RAIL (800-872-7245).

By Water
Water is never far away in Virginia Beach. The city contains 51.3 square miles of water, which takes form in the dozens of rivers, bays, lakes, marsh areas and fingers of water that flow into the Atlantic Ocean and Chesapeake Bay. Linking the Chesapeake Bay and James River estuaries is the Hampton Roads harbor, one of the finest natural harbors and home port to the world’s largest naval base. Here, the Intracoastal Waterway begins at mile marker 1. From Virginia Beach, recreational boaters can travel as far north as Boston and south to Brownsville, Texas.

Navigators along the East Coast can reach Virginia Beach by plotting a course on the Intracoastal Waterway or Atlantic Ocean. For more information about local marinas and slip fees, call 1-800-VA BEACH.

C- Attractions/Things To Do:
The Virginia Marine Science Museum
717 General Booth Boulevard, Virginia Beach
Tel:717-425-FISH
The States largest aquarium with 800,000 gallons of aquariums and live habitats this is one of the top ten most visited aquariums in the country . A must see for all ages.

Oceana Navel Air Station
Oceana Boulevard or London Bridge Rd
Tel:757-433-3131
One of the U.S Navy’s four master jet bases with 22 squadrons. Seasonal tours are available

Historic Cape Henry
Atlantic Ave/Fort Story, Virginia Beach
Tel: 757-460-1688
Come see and stand where perhaps your ancestors first set foot on the New World back in 1607. The first landing cross marks the place. Also, here you will see the oldest government built lighthouse in the USA, dating back to 1791.

The Pavilion, Virginia Beach Convention Center
1000 19th Street
Tel: 757-437-7629
The convention center is in a wonderful building of interesting architecture, which hosts a variety of events each year. A great location for a trade show or meeting.

Association for Research & Enlightenment
67th Street/Atlantic Ave., Virginia Beach
Tel: 757-428-3588
Now here’s a unique place to visit. It’s the International headquarters documenting the works of psychic Edgar Cayce.

Seashore State Park
2500 Shore Drive, Virginia Beach
Tel: 757-481- 2131
With more than 27 miles of hiking trails, camping and picnic areas this 2700-acre area is a nature lovers paradise.

Upper Wolfsnare House
2040 Potters Road, Virginia Beach
Tel: 757-491-3490
If History is your passion this house is a must. Built in 1759 by Thomas Walke III it gives a wonderful insight into life at that time.

Adam Thoroughgood House
1636 Parrish Road, Virginia Beach
Tel: 757- 460 0007
Step back in time and visit this 17th Century house in the style of an old English Cottage and discover historic herbs and flowers in the gardens.

Contemporary Art Center
2200 Parks Ave, Virginia Beach
Tel: 757-425 0000
Although specializing in the presentation of 20th century art styles, the Art Center also presents an eclectic mixture of fine Art forms.

Tidewater Veterans Memorial
19th Street, Virginia Beach
In appreciation of the contributions of the military in the area, a magnificent sculpture/waterfall has been erected here.

Rudee Inlet 7 Marina
Winston-Salem Ave, (Nr. Pacific Ave)
Fun for all if you plan a day out here. Whether it’s a Chesapeake Bay and Virginia Beach tour of 2 hours or a full days sports fishing you’re after, you’ll find it here.

Old Coast Guard Station
24th Street/Atlantic Ave, Virginia Beach
Tel: 757-422 1587
For those of you who come down to the sea, to dream of days gone by, this museum will transport you back in time with historical stories to tell of shipwrecks off the coast and a history of the area.

Virginia Zoological Park
3500 Granby Street
Norfolk, VA
Tel: 757- 441 2706
Located only about half an hour’s drive from Virginia Beach you will find this fine Zoo. The whole family will love it!

Colonial Williamsburg
Henry Street/Rt 199
Tel: 1-800 History
Williamsburg is a must if you’re staying in the Virginia Beach area. It’s about 1 hour’s drive away and there’s lots to see and do with 18th Century houses, a governors mansion, the capital plus Colonial restaurants and shops. Learn all about the history of the area from costumed characters who’ll stroll among you and put on wonderful plays. Special events are put on at different times of the day and evening.

D- Family Fun Attractions:
Busch Gardens Williamsburg
45 minutes from Virginia Beach
open from March through October
hours 10am-10pm most days
Tel:757 253 3350
Busch Gardens Williamsburg has four of the world’s top-rated roller coasters, including Alpengeist and the new Apollo’s Chariot. This hypercoaster will plummet riders a total of 825 feet. From awesome rides and spectacular shows to superb shopping and fabulous feasts, Busch Gardens Williamsburg offers a fun-filled adventure you’ll never forget.
Directions:
Take Interstate 64 West to Exit 242A, then follow SR 199 2 Miles to US 60, take US 60 east, 1.5 Miles to entrance

Water Country USA
45 minutes Virginia Beach
Open May through September
hours 10am-8pm, late summer 7pm and 6pm
Tel: 1 800-343-SWIM
With more than 35 wacky cool water rides, super shopping and tasty treats, Water Country USA is the coolest way to beat the heat. Directions:
Take Interstate 64 West to Exit 242A, then follow SR 199 ¼ Mile to Entrance

Colonial Williamsburg
Open March through August
hours 9.30am-5pm
Tel:1-800-HISTORY
Colonial Williamsburg is the world’s largest outdoor living history museum. Learn all about the history of the area from costumed characters who’ll stroll among you and put on wonderful plays. Special events are put on at different times of the day and evening. Directions:
About an hours drive from Virginia Beach midway between Richmond and Norfolk on I-64 (exit 238). After exiting, look for the green and white signs for the Visitor Center. Once you purchase your admissions pass, you can either take the shuttle bus or walk to the Historic Area.

Virginia Air & Space Centre
600 Settlers Landing Road,Hampton,Va
Tel: 757 727 0800
Less than an hour from Virginia Beach is the Air & Space museum which will bring excitement and fun for kids of all ages!

The Virgina Marine Science Museum
717 General Booth Boulevard, Virginia Beach
Tel:717 425 FISH
The States largest aquarium with 800,000 gallons of aquariums and live habitats this ‘Travel Attraction of the Year’ is one of the top ten most visited aquariums in the country . A must see for all ages.

Old Coast Guard Station
24th Street/Atlantic Ave, Virginia Beach
Tel: 757-422 1587
For those of you who come down to the sea, to dream of days gone by, this museum will transport you back in time with historical stories to tell of shipwrecks off the coast and a history of the area.

Childrens Museum
221 High Street Portsmouth
Tel: 757-393 8393
Kids looking for something different to do? Well approx. 30 minutes form Virginia Beach is a fun museum. Watch them delight while playing with the big Bubble machine where they can make bubble as big as themselves! Or hold your breath as you watch them scale the indoor rock-climbing wall

Ocean Breeze Amusement Park
849 General Booth Boulevard
Tel: 757 422 4444
A traditional amusement park to complement a day at the beach.

E- Events & Entertainment:
Street Stages (all summer)
7th, 17th & 24th
Virginia Beach
Tel: 757- 491 SUNN
Head to these stages for entertainment at all times of day and night. Free for all! You’ll find a great variety to choose from such as musicians and singers, magicians and comedians.

The Hampton Roads Shakespeare Festival (all summer)
2000 Seatack Neighborhood Park
Virginia Beach
Tel: 757-425 1154

June

Latin American Festival

June-September

Beach Street USA

Nightly 8 – 11:30 p.m.

July 4

Stars and Stripes Explosion

Mid-July

Mid-Atlantic Hermit Crab Festival

Late July

Philippine-American Festival

August

Tiger Birthday Party
Virginia Zoo hosts a birthday party for its tigers.

Live Bird Café at the Virginia Beach Zoo

Ongoing Sat & Sun 12pm & 1pm

Late August

Soul Music Beach Festival

September

Labor Day Weekend

Verizon Wireless American Music Festival

Early September

Rock and Roll Half Marathon

Mid-September

Blues at the Beach

Annual Neptune Festival
Features a variety of competitions and entertainment

Early October

Virginia Beach Annual Film Festival

Mid-October

Annual Oktober Brew Festival

Halloween (Late October)

Screech Street Festival

Williamsburg, Virginia

A- Overview:
Colonial Williamsburg is the nation’s largest and oldest outdoor living history museum. It portrays 18th-century Williamsburg in all its beauty and grandeur, just as it appeared on the eve of the American Revolution.

Williamsburg is located in southeastern Virginia on a peninsula between the James and York Rivers, which run into Chesapeake Bay. Settled in 1632, it was Virginia’s capital from 1699 to 1779. After that time, the city unfortunately declined, and it was not until the 1920’s that people again took a real interest in Williamsburg. It was in 1926 that the idea of excavating and restoring the colonial site of Williamsburg took root. Williamsburg then underwent a complete transformation from an industrial town to what is now known as Colonial Williamsburg.

Colonial Williamsburg bridges Virginia’s past and present, with remnants of the past preserved amid the cultural and commercial bustle of the modern day. Throughout the city, an engaging mix of sights, sounds and activities helps visitors reconnect with America’s past and become active participants in 18th-century life. Not only can visitors enjoy the restored buildings, but also actors recreate the everyday lives of early settlers. On Colonial Williamsburg’s 173 acres, 88 original 18th- and early 19th-century structures, such as the courthouse, have been meticulously restored. The site curators are dedicated to maintaining the period’s integrity in every detail from pieces of furniture, pottery, china, glass, silver, pewter, textiles, tools, and carpeting, to landscaping.

All year round, visitors can observe hundreds of costumed interpreters wearing bonnets or three-cornered hats and speaking in character. Many residents of the settlement demonstrate their trades in venues open to the public. Historic trade demonstrations, dramatic vignettes, interactive programs and encounters with “People of the Past” take place in 28 exhibition sites and historic trade shops throughout the Historic Area. Visitors can enjoy 18th-century style dining in authentic colonial surroundings at any one of Colonial Williamsburg’s four operating taverns.

For a vacation with the grandchildren, for a holiday celebration with the family, or for a time of personal reflection: treat yourself to the opportunity to become part of our nation’s living history in Colonial Williamsburg!

B- City Information:
Population: 11,998

Elevation: 86 feet above sea level

Land Area: 8.5 square miles

Location: Williamsburg is 150 miles south of Washington, D.C., midway between Richmond and Virginia Beach, Virginia on Interstate 64.

Time Zone: Williamsburg is located in the Eastern Time Zone (when it’s noon in Williamsburg, it’s 11am in Chicago and 9am in Los Angeles). Williamsburg observes Daylight Savings Time April – October.

Weather:

Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

Average temp. (°F)
38.5
41.2
48.8
57.8
66.2
73.8
78.1
76.5
70.8
59.8
50.9
42.5

High temperature (°F)
48.9
52.4
61.0
71.1
78.2
85.2
89.0
87.1
81.6
71.5
62.4
53.0

Low temperature (°F)
28.1
29.9
36.6
44.4
54.1
62.3
67.2
65.9
60.0
48.0
39.3
31.9

Precipitation (in)
4.2
3.4
4.6
3.2
4.5
3.4
5.3
5.0
5.0
3.6
3.4
3.3

Climate:

Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

Days with precip.
10
9
11
9
11
9
11
9
8
7
8
9

Wind speed (mph)
9.4
9.9
10.4
10.1
8.9
8.3
7.7
7.4
7.9
8.3
8.7
9.1

Morning humidity (%)
78
77
76
75
79
81
83
86
88
87
82
79

Afternoon humidity (%)
58
55
51
48
53
55
57
59
58
56
54
57

Sunshine (%)
54
57
61
65
64
69
66
64
63
61
58
54

Days clear of clouds
8
8
8
8
7
7
7
7
9
12
9
9

Partly cloudy days
7
6
8
9
10
12
12
12
9
7
8
6

Cloudy days
16
14
15
13
14
12
12
12
12
12
13
15

Snowfall (in)
4.2
3.5
1.8
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.2
1.6

Local Seasons:

Summer is the busiest time of year as visitors come to visit and experience the many historic attractions in and around the area. With the summertime temperatures averaging in the high 70s F, with daytime highs in the mid to high 90s and evenings dropping into the 60s F, it is possible to spend the entire day and night seeing the sights. Spring and fall are quite beautiful with the changing of the seasons. In the spring, the blossoms begin to appear as early as March and dot the countryside. It’s a great time to take a walk and enjoy all that Mother Nature has to offer. The same applies to the fall when the area becomes an array of beautiful colors and temperatures to match. Winter is the slower time of year and snow does fall but it does make the town look even more “picture perfect”. While the temperatures do drop during this time, the daytime can reach the 40s F, giving the visitor the choice of both indoor and outdoor activities to pursue.

How to Get There:

By Car

Easily accessible by car, Williamsburg is conveniently located 150 miles south of Washington, D.C., midway between Richmond and Virginia Beach, Virginia on Interstate 64.

From Interstate 64, visitors may take exits 227 through 242 to reach different points of interest in the Historic Triangle.

Exits 227, 230, and 234 – route travels to Route 60 West.

Exit 238 – route travels to Colonial Williamsburg and the downtown area.

Exit 242 – route travels to Route 60 East.

By Air

Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport (PHF)

900 Bland Blvd.

Newport News, VA 23602

757-877-0221

The airport is located 20 minutes from downtown and is served by many of the low cost regional airlines.

Norfolk International Airport (ORF)

2200 Northview Avenue

Norfolk, VA 23518

757-857-3351

The airport is located approximately 50 minutes from Williamsburg and is serviced by many of the national airlines as well as certain regional carriers.

Richmond International Airport (RIC)

1 Richard E Byrd Terminal Drive

Richmond VA 23250

804-226-3000

The airport is located 50 minutes from Williamsburg and is serviced by a variety of the national airlines as well as certain regional carriers.

Ground Transportation

Ground transportation is available at all three airports, including car rental companies, taxis, and limousines

.

By Train

Amtrak

468 North Boundary Street
Williamsburg, VA 23185

800-USA-RAIL

Direct Amtrak service from Baltimore, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C.

How to Get Around:

Very few cars are allowed in the Historic Area from 8am – 10pm daily, so visitors must find alternate parking. In addition a shuttle bus is available.

The Williamsburg Visitors Shuttle

757-259-4111

Fee Charged

The shuttle bus operates from Memorial Day until Labor Day, from 9am -10pm.

National Holidays:

New Year’s Day, January 1

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, the third Monday in January

President’ Day, the third Monday in February

Memorial Day, the last Monday in May

Independence Day, July 4

Labor Day, the first Monday in September

Thanksgiving Day, the fourth Thursday in November

Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, December 24 and 25

New Year’s Eve, December 31

C- Attractions/Things To Do:
Colonial Williamsburg
I-64 Exit 238
757-220-7645
Colonial Williamsburg is a marvel, a true recreation of the city that was the capital of Virginia from 1699 until 1780. All year round hundreds of costumed interpreters, wearing bonnets or three-cornered hats, rove and ride through the cobblestone streets.

Water Country USA
One Busch Gardens Blvd.
Williamsburg VA 23187-8785
757-253-3350
A splash of amusing entertainment and a drop of fun-filled adventure add up to gallons of great times at Water Country USA. It is the largest water theme park in the mid-Atlantic region. Watch the breathtaking high-dive spectacular at the Aqua Theatre. Visit Kid’s Kingdom. -Just My Size- rides, shows and pools await kids of all ages when they visit this water wonderland. Unique features include unusual water ski boats filled with slides, waterfalls, fountains and water guns.

Busch Gardens Williamsburg
One Busch Gardens Boulevard
P.O. Box 8785
Williamsburg VA 23187-8785
757-253-3350
Busch Gardens Williamsburg recreates the 17th-century charm of old world Europe. Journey through more than 30 spine-tingling rides and attractions, sparkling live shows and a wide variety of authentic foods and shops. Busch Gardens Williamsburg provides thrills and chills for the entire family. One special feature is the WILD MAUS roller coaster, this colorful and dynamic ride mimics the motion of a mouse through a maze. LAND OF THE DRAGONS is a colorful, musical adventure area designed for younger children. This unique attraction features a three-story tree house inhabited by Busch Gardens’ resident dragon -Dumphrey- and his delightful dragon friends.

Jamestown Settlement
Rte. 31 off Colonial Pkwy
757-229-1607
This is a living-history museum, with a reconstructed fort staffed by docents dressed as colonists. It also features an inhabited “Indian Village” At the pier there are reproductions of the Godspeed, the Discovery, and the Susan Constant.

Yorktown Battlefield
Colonial Pkwy
757-898-3400
The museum displays George Washington’s original field tent; dioramas, illuminated maps, and a short movie tell the story. A free range walking tour is available of the battlefield.

The Yorktown Victory Center
Rte. 238 off Colonial Pkwy
757-887-1776
Located next door to the Yorktown Battlefield, it consists of a Continental Army encampment, with tents, a covered wagon, and interpreters-costumed as soldiers. Inhabitants speak to visitors in the regional dialects of the time.

Bassett Hall
Francis Street
Williamsburg VA 23185
757-229-1000
Bassett Hall was built in 1760. This home was the Williamsburg residence of Mr and Mrs Rockefeller, Jr. from 1936 to 1979. The house is furnished with antiques and folk art from the Rockefeller’s collection.

Jamestown Festival Park
P.O. Drawer Jf
Williamsburg VA 23187
757-229-1607
Jamestown Festival Park features full-size replicas of the three ships, which arrived in 1607 with the Jamestown colonists. The Susan Constant, Godspeed and Discovery are moored at the Festival Park pier. James Fort and an Indian village have also been reconstructed. Costumed interpreters provide information about these exhibits. A restaurant and a gift shop are located on the premises.

Carter’s Grove Plantation
Carter’s Grove Plantation was built in 1750 by Robert “King” Carter. The property was purchased and renovated in 1929 and has since been designated as the “most beautiful house in America”. The grounds contain a representation of Wolstenholme Towne, a community of the 17th century destroyed in 1622 by an Indian attack. Archeologists uncovered the site in the 1970’s. A visitor center, demonstrations, exhibits and a gift shop are available.

Busch Gardens Brewery
One Busch Gardens Boulevard
Williamsburg VA 23187
757-253-3039
While visiting Busch gardens, you can take the -Eagle One- monorail over for a brewery visit from April through November. Visitors have the opportunity to see our world-famous Budweiser Clydesdales up close in Heather Downs, the Scottish village section of Busch Gardens. While at the brewery, you may take a leisurely self-guided tour.

D- Family Fun Attractions:
Colonial Williamsburg
I-64 Exit 238
757-220-7645
Colonial Williamsburg is a marvel, a true recreation of the city that was the capital of Virginia from 1699 until 1780. All year round hundreds of costumed interpreters, wearing bonnets or three-cornered hats, rove and ride through the cobblestone streets.

Water Country USA
One Busch Gardens Blvd
Williamsburg VA 23187-8785
757-253-3350
A splash of amusing entertainment and a drop of fun-filled adventure add up to gallons of great times at Water Country USA. It is the largest water theme park in the mid-Atlantic region. Watch the breathtaking high-dive spectacular at the Aqua Theatre. Visit Kid’s Kingdom. -Just My Size- rides, shows and pools await kids of all ages when they visit this water wonderland. Unique features include unusual water ski boats filled with slides, waterfalls, fountains and water guns.

Busch Gardens Williamsburg
One Busch Gardens Boulevard
P.O. Box 8785
Williamsburg VA 23187-8785
757-253-3350
Busch Gardens Williamsburg recreates the 17th-century charm of old world Europe. Journey through more than 30 spine-tingling rides and attractions, sparkling live shows and a wide variety of authentic foods and shops. Busch Gardens Williamsburg provides thrills and chills for the entire family. One special feature is the WILD MAUS roller coaster, this colorful and dynamic ride mimics the motion of a mouse through a maze. LAND OF THE DRAGONS is a colorful, musical adventure area designed for younger children. This unique attraction features a three-story tree house inhabited by Busch Gardens’ resident dragon -Dumphrey- and his delightful dragon friends.

Jamestown Settlement
Rte. 31 off Colonial Pkwy
757-229-1607
This is a living-history museum, with a reconstructed fort staffed by docents dressed as colonists. It also features an inhabited “Indian Village” At the pier there are reproductions of the Godspeed, the Discovery, and the Susan Constant.

Yorktown Battlefield
Colonial Pkwy
757-898-3400
The museum displays George Washington’s original field tent; dioramas, illuminated maps, and a short movie tell the story. A free range walking tour is available of the battlefield.

The Yorktown Victory Center
Rte. 238 off Colonial Pkwy
757-887-1776
Located next door to the Yorktown Battlefield, it consists of a Continental Army encampment, with tents, a covered wagon, and interpreters-costumed as soldiers. Inhabitants speak to visitors in the regional dialects of the time.

E- Events & Entertainment:
Events

January

Williamsburg Quilt Festival

Usually held the third week of February

215-862-5828

Explore an American art that has developed and grown with the nation. Williamsburg Festival Week is a compilation of four exciting quilting, fiber arts, and wearable art shows, and is the perfect place for quilters and wearable, textile and fiber artists of all levels and ages to explore these arts. These four festivals revolve around the textile arts: the Mid-Atlantic Quilt Festival; the Mid-Atlantic Wearable Art Festival; the Mid-Atlantic Fiber Arts Fair; and the Williamsburg Quilt & Vintage Annex. In all, more than 500 quilts, wearables, dolls and textiles on exhibit; workshops, lectures and special activities offered; four Merchant Malls with more than 140 vendors.

May

Spring Native Wildflower Sale

Held in early May

Virginia Living Museum

Newport News, VA.

757-595-1900

Admission Free

More than 40 species of native perennials, grasses and shrubs are available for purchase in this joint sale by the Virginia Living Museum and Virginia Native Plants Society. All plants are nursery propagated.

Civil War Weekend

Held in late May

Yorktown National Cemetery and Confederate Cemetery

757-898-2410

Tactical demonstrations, encampments and a Confederate field hospital interpret the role Yorktown played during the Peninsula Campaign. Special Memorial Day ceremonies take place at the Yorktown Victory Center,

July

The Road to Independence: People of Vision

Held over the Fourth of July weekend

888-593-4682

Salute America during the third annual Fourth of July event, leading up to the anniversary of the momentous American victory at Yorktown. The two-day event explores the important personalities of the American Revolution. Visitors can join in military drills and learn about the sacrifices of our nation’s founders, including those who signed the Declaration of Independence.

Fourth of July at Colonial Williamsburg

Held on the Fourth of July

Colonial Williamsburg

800-HISTORY

A salute to the 13 Colonies, a reading of the Declaration of Independence, a garden party at the Palace, and fireworks at 9:15 p.m. Fireworks viewing open to the public. Garden Party requires admission.

Yorktown Independence Day Celebration

Held on the Fourth of July

757-890-3500

Hours: 9am – 10pm

Admission Free

Celebrate the Fourth of July in the place where independence was won. This family-oriented event is staged in Historic Yorktown and has something for everyone, including an arts and crafts show, a classic car show, parade, children’s game area, food and beverages, musical entertainment and of course, a spectacular fireworks show over the York River.

Watermen’s Heritage Festival

Held in mid July

Watermen’s Museum

309 Water Street

Yorktown

757-887-2641

Admission Charged

The Work Boat races start with a parade of Work Boats at 12:30 pm followed by the blessing of the fleet and the races. Activities include exhibits, contests, demonstrations, crafts and artwork for sale. There are children’s activities and displays from local military bases including the Naval Weapons Station and the Coast Guard Training Base. The Yorktown Trolley runs from the parking areas in town to the Watermen’s Museum.

September

National Public Lands Day

Held in mid September

Colonial National Historical Park

Historic Jamestown and Yorktown Battlefield

757-898-2410

Admission Free

A celebration of the role that publicly owned lands play in the preservation of America’s natural and cultural resources at one of the 387 areas nationwide administered by the National Park Service.

Bacon’s Rebellion Weekend

Held in mid September

Historic Jamestown

757-898-2410

Evening walking tours will relate the details of Bacon’s Rebellion as they occurred at Jamestown, including a symbolic burning of the town site. Living history programs during the weekend highlight the actions of key events of the rebellion.

October

Howl-O-Scream

Held during the entire month of October

Busch Gardens Williamsburg

800-343-7943

Admission Charged

The creeps come out at night as Howl-O-Scream returns to haunt Busch Gardens Williamsburg. Monstrous mayhem is on hand as this 17th century European-themed adventure park transforms into a “scream” park full of Halloween fun.

Spirits and Witches Brew Lunch and Tour or Candlelight Dinner Tour

Held various days throughout the month of October

Edgewood Plantation

Charles City, VA

800-296-3343

Reservations required

Edgewood Plantation has a lunch or dinner and a tour of the plantation where countless ghost stories have been written, including one about the legendary lost Civil War love of Lizzie Rowland.

An Occasion for the Arts

Held in early October

Merchants Square

757-259-1206

Admission Free

Annual juried festival of nationally acclaimed artists; performances by jazz, classical, Dixieland, acoustic, country and rock musicians; youth art and stage.

Italian Festival

Held in mid October

On the grounds of the Williamsburg Winery

757-220-5535

Admission Charged

Italian food, Virginia wines, entertainment and artisans, plus an Alfa Romeo classic car exhibit and activities for children.

Yorktown Victory Celebration

Held in mid October

Special programs also are held in Yorktown at Yorktown Battlefield, administered by Colonial National Historical Park.

Yorktown Victory Center

888-593-5682

Military life and artillery demonstrations mark the anniversary of America’s momentous victory at Yorktown. To experience Continental Army life firsthand, visitors may enroll in “A School for the Soldier,” where they can try on uniforms, march to the beat of a Revolutionary drum and join in other hands-on military activities.

Night of the Living Museum

Usually held the third week of October

Virginia Living Museum

Newport News, VA.

757-595-1900

Hours: 6pm – 9pm

Admission Charged

A family Halloween celebration returns at the Virginia Living Museum, featuring live animal shows, a night trail walk, and various creatures of the night. Hear Halloween and night animal myths dispelled and experience a haunting planetarium show filled with little known Halloween facts. This is a non-scary event for families with children ages 12 and under.

November

Berkeley Plantation First Thanksgiving Festival

Held in early November

Berkeley Plantation

Charles City, VA

888-466-6018

Hours: 9am – 5pm

Admission Charged

Celebrate the 1619 landing of the original colonists at Berkeley Plantation; the site of the first official Thanksgiving in America, for a day dedicated to history, food and fun with tours of the 1726 manor house, Thanksgiving dinner at Berkeley Coach House Tavern, walks in the colorful autumn gardens and a formal living history program.

Foods & Feasts of Colonial Virginia

Jamestown Settlement & Yorktown Victory Center

888-593-4682

Admission Charged

Explore Virginia food of the 17th and 18th centuries during this three-day event beginning on Thanksgiving Day. At Jamestown Settlement, learn how food was gathered, preserved and prepared on land and at sea by Virginia’s English colonists and Powhatan Indians. At the Yorktown Victory Center, learn about typical soldiers’ fare during the American Revolution and trace the bounty of a 1780s farm from field to kitchen.

December

Annual Williamsburg Area Community Christmas Parade

Held in early December

757-229-6511

Hours: 9am

Admission Free

Starts at Merchants Square.

Annual Christmas Homes Tour Presented by the Green Springs Garden Club

757-565-7844

Admission Charged

Tour private residences in or near the Historic Area that are not usually open to the public. Each location will be decorated with holiday floral arrangements.

The Grand Illumination

Colonial Williamsburg

800-HISTORY

Admission not required for viewing

Colonial Williamsburg welcomes the Christmas holiday season with candles, fireworks and music.

A Colonial Christmas

Held mid to late December

Jamestown Settlement & Yorktown Victory Center

888-593-4682

Admission Charged

Experience 17th-and 18th-century holiday traditions. At Jamestown Settlement, a film and special guided tours compare and contrast English Christmas customs of the period with how the season may have been observed in the difficult early years of the Jamestown colony. At the Yorktown Victory Center, hear accounts of Christmas and winter in military encampments during the American Revolution and glimpse holiday preparations on a 1780s Virginia farm.

Burlington, Vermont

A- Overview:
Burlington, the largest population center in Vermont, is only 76 miles south of Montreal, Canada. The city was founded in 1763 and is popular destinations in New England. Outside Magazine even named the city a “Dream Town.” People come to Burlington, and Vermont, to enjoy the outdoors and the small town life.
Burlington lies the shore of Lake Champlain, which forms a beautiful backdrop to the town and its many activities. Skiing, hiking and spectacular scenery are an essential part of life in Vermont and in Burlington. The mountains and hills, the national parks, the ski areas, the lakes, and the dramatic change of seasons draw many visitors.

Indoors and out, Burlington has much to offer. The Church Street Marketplace is a pedestrian mall filled with small boutiques, cafes, and craft vendors. Burlington has a wonderfully independent culture all its own. The city is a favorite of residents of Vermont, who come to Burlington to experience the festive hospitality of the city.

Burlington’s unique small town, yet sophisticated culture, its generous and happy spirit, and its incomparable scenery all combine to inspire and to refresh.

B- City Information:
The Spirit of Ethan Allen
Burlington Boat House, College St. at Battery St.
802-862-9685
This replica of an old paddle-boat takes people on narrated cruises upon Lake Champlain. Guests can eat dinner as they drift by the Adirondacks and the Green Mountains.

Lake Champlain Basin Science Center
One College St.
802-864-1848
This center has presentations about the ecology, history, and culture of the lake region. The hands-on exhibits are a favorite with children and adults.

Ethan Allen Homestead
North Ave., off Rte. 127, north of Burlington
802-865-4556
This museum is dedicated to the life of Vermont’s famous founding father. The house is filled with colonial furniture and exhibits, and the nearby trails are beautiful.

Shelburne Museum
Rte. 7, 5 mi south of Burlington
802-985-3346.
This museum is located on 45 acres and includes 37 buildings. Its collections number more than 80,000 objects, including 18th- and 19th-century period homes and furniture, fine and folk art, farm tools, more than 200 carriages and sleighs, Audubon prints, an old-fashioned jail, and even a private railroad car from the days of steam! Kids of all ages will love the antique toy exhibit.

Shelburne Farms
West of Rte. 7 at the junction of Harbor and Bay Rds., 6 mi south of Burlington
802-985-8686
This 1,400-acre property is an educational and cultural resource center. Visitors can see a working dairy farm, get to milk a cow and get up close to many other farm animals at the Children’s Farmyard, watch the making of world-famous Vermont cheddar cheese, listen to nature lectures, or simply stroll the immaculate grounds stretching along the Lake Champlain waterfront.

Vermont Teddy Bear Company
2236 Shelburne Rd., Shelburne
802-985-3001
This teddy bear headquarters loves to talk about toys and bears of all shapes and sizes. A children’s play tent is set up outdoors in summer, and visitors are welcome to tour the beautiful 57-acre property.

Vermont Wildflower Farm
Rte. 7, 5 mi south of the Shelburne Museum
802-425-3500
This 6-acre farm features eye-popping displays of various floral arrangements throughout the year: violets in the spring, daisies and black-eyed Susans for summer, and a full palette of fall colors.

Green Mountain Audobon Nature Center
18 mi southeast of Burlington, Huntington-Richmond Rd., Richmond
802-434-3068
The center’s 300 acres of diverse habitats are a wildlife sanctuary filled with trails. Educational activities appeal to both kids and adults.

Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge
Swanton, 36 mi north of Burlington, 36 mi north of Burlington
802-868-4781
This refuge includes 6,300 acres of federally protected wetlands, meadows, and woods. Bird-watchers and other outdoor enthusiasts can walk, canoe, jog, picnic, and have a great time in this beautiful preserve.

C- Attractions/Things To Do:
Lake Champlain Basin Science Center
One College St.
802-864-1848
This center presents a variety of information about the ecology, history, and culture of the lake region. The hands-on exhibits are a favorite with children and adults.

Ethan Allen Homestead
North Ave., off Rte. 127, north of Burlington
802-865-4556
This museum is dedicated to the life of Vermont’s famous founding father. The house is filled with colonial furniture and historical exhibits. The nearby trails are beautiful in every season.

Shelburne Museum
Rte. 7, 5 mi south of Burlington
802-985-3346.
This extensive museum is located on 45 acres and includes 37 buildings. Its collections feature over 80,000 objects including 18th- and 19th-century period homes and furniture, fine and folk art, farm tools, more than 200 carriages and sleighs, Audubon prints, an old-fashioned jail, and even a private railroad car from the days of steam! Kids of all ages will love the antique toy exhibit.

Shelburne Farms
West of Rte. 7 at the junction of Harbor and Bay Rds., 6 mi south of Burlington
802-985-8686
This 1,400-acre property is an educational and cultural resource center. Visitors can see a working dairy farm, get to milk a cow and get up close to many other farm animals at the Children’s Farmyard, watch the making of world-famous Vermont cheddar cheese, listen to nature lectures, or simply stroll the immaculate grounds stretching along the Lake Champlain waterfront.

Vermont Teddy Bear Company
2236 Shelburne Rd., Shelburne
802-985-3001
This teddy bear headquarters loves to talk about toys and bears of all shapes and sizes. A children’s play tent is set up outdoors in summer, and visitors are welcome to tour the beautiful 57-acre property. It’s almost too much to “bear.”

Vermont Wildflower Farm
Rte. 7, 5 mi south of the Shelburne Museum
802-425-3500
This 6-acre farm features eye-popping displays with changing floral arrangements throughout the year: violets in the spring, daisies and black-eyed Susans for summer, and a full palette of fall colors.

Green Mountain Audobon Nature Center
18 mi southeast of Burlington, Huntington-Richmond Rd., Richmond
802-434-3068
The center’s 300 acres of diverse habitats are a wildlife sanctuary filled with walking trails. Educational activities will enthrall kids and adults alike.

Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge
Swanton, 36 mi north of Burlington, 36 mi north of Burlington
802-868-4781
This refuge includes 6,300 acres of federally protected wetlands, meadows, and woods. Bird-watchers and other outdoor enthusiasts can walk, canoe, jog, picnic, and have a great time in this beautiful preserve.