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Vienna Travel Guide – Deals

Quick Links:

A – Overview

B – City information

C – Attractions & Things To Do

D – Family Fun Attractions

E – Events & Entertainments

F – Vienna Travel Deals

Before the Second World War, Vienna stood side by side with Paris and London in importance, beauty, and power, thanks to its status as a major transit point between Western and Eastern Europe. The rich and elite of Europe vacationed here while the poor viewed it as an opportunity to escape their miseries. Here, artists and composers sought inspiration and revolutionaries ironed out their plans and theories.

vienna overview

Vienna, however, has not always been considered such a romantic destination. The city found itself just a few miles from the Iron Curtain during the Cold War. Hence, trade ceased with the East, and foreigners found little reason to visit a war-torn city. However, with the sudden popularity and growth of the Eastern Jewels (Budapest, Prague, and Kraków), Vienna rediscovered its role as a gateway. In-transit tourists, as well, have rediscovered Vienna’s old-world charm, often making an unexpected extended stay. There is no better time than now to visit this magnificent city.

People traveling to Vienna looking for fin-de-siècle architecture and a relaxed atmosphere will not be disappointed. Imagine a city shaped by artists and composers 150 years ago. Huge palaces seem to appear on every major street corner, and the sky is pierced with towering church steeples. The buildings along the Ringstrasse seem to offer a bit of every European building style, from the medieval Rathaus, Gothic Stephensdom, to the Greco-Roman parliament building.

Visitors quickly embrace the old-world style of Vienna. The streets are lined with quaint shops, cafés, and bakeries. Men are still gentlemen, while women still dress themselves up before strolling around town. The locals are generally conservative, well educated, and well mannered. They will notice you looking at a map or deciphering a sign, but are too polite to bother you. However, if you ask them, then you will find that most Viennese speak a bit of English and are happy to help a traveler.

Country:
Republic of Austria

Capital:
Vienna

Time:
Austria uses Central European Time (CET). Hence, clocks are one hour ahead of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) and six hours ahead of Eastern Standard Time (EST).

Currency:
Currency is the Euro (EUR). The notes are in denominations of 500, 200, 100, 50, 20, 10, and 5 euro. The denominations of coins are 2 euro, 1 euro, 50 euro cent, 20 euro cent, 10 euro cent, 5 euro cent, 2 euro cent, and 1 euro cent.

Weather:
Vienna experiences quite pleasant weather during the summer. However, winters can be cold and icy, so be prepared by bringing warm clothing and high-grip shoes.

Custom Regulations:
Customs have become even easier with membership in the European Union. EU citizens need an ID card, while all others require a valid passport. Americans can stay in Austria without a visa for up to 90 days. However, arrivals from neighboring EU members (Germany, Italy) are rarely checked, regardless of citizenship.

Electricity:
Austria uses 220 volts AC and the continental-style plug. If your appliance has a 120/240-volt switch, all you will need is a plug adapter. Otherwise a current converter is required. Pay attention to sockets in bathrooms and on trains marked “Shavers Only!” While these put out 110 volts, they will burn out with a more powerful appliance.

Tipping:
Offer a 10-15% tip to taxi drivers and attendants at theatres and cloakrooms. Restaurants and cafés are generally ‘Bedienungszuschlag inbegriffen’ (service included). Vienna service staff, however, seem to ignore this and expect something extra.

Dress Code:
Austria is no different than the rest of Western Europe. Business attire, of course, consists of suits for both men and women. Outside business hours, Austrians are generally casual dressers, with young people often wearing shorts and t-shirts. A jacket and tie are usually worn to exclusive restaurants and for a night out at the theatre or opera.

Greetings:
Address people by their title, and offer a handshake. Take a small gift of wine or chocolates if you are invited to someone’s house.

Getting Around:

Car:
Austrians are renowned for their law-abiding traits, and this is most evident in their polite driving habits. Roads are well-marked Drivers in Austria require their national driving license, all relevant car documents, and proof of car insurance. In addition, all vehicles require a first-aid kit. Keep in mind that all of Austria’s highways are toll roads. Tickets are available at border crossings and must be presented on demand to avoid a fine.

Public Transport:
Vienna has an excellent subway system that is very easy to understand. Buy tickets from machines in subway stations. Be sure to purchase normal tickets, and not discounted ones, even if you have an international student ID. The buses and trams use the same tickets. Large maps are near every tram stop detailing routes throughout the city. Day tickets are available, and are a good buy if you plan to see a lot of sights.

Bicycles:
Cyclists, rejoice! Vienna’s streets are very bicycle friendly, and offer a perfect way to see the city in no time. Rent bicycles at the Westbanhof.

Taxis:
Taxis in Vienna are nearly impossible to hail. Try taxi stands in front of hotels.

Trains:
Austia’s rail system is right on par with neighboring Germany and Switzerland in quality. Vienna has several stations, but most people arriving from the West arrive at Westbahnhof. Trains heading east and south usually depart from Sudbahnhof. Trains from Germany generally arrive at Ostbahnhof. The major train stations offer information services

Schloss Schönbrunn
Schönbrunner Schloss-strasse, A-1130 Vienna
Tel: +43 1 811 13
The biggest attraction in the Western part of Vienna is the summer palace. Sometimes called the “Versailles of Vienna”, this huge Baroque residence has more then 1400 rooms and grand formal gardens. Two tours that guide visitors through 100+ rooms are available. However, the palace itself is a minor attraction compared to the entire property. The palace grounds also include a terrific zoo, marvelous tree-covered paths, and Roman ruin Follies. Open from Nov – Mar, daily 08:30 – 16:30 and from Apr – Oct, daily 08:30 – 17:00.

schloss schoenbrunn

St Stephen’s Cathedral (Building, view map)
Stephanspl., A-1010 Vienna
Tel: +43 1 515 52526
St. Stephan’s gothic structure seems a little out of place among the modern glass and steel buildings lining the Stephansplatz. However, it’s the things that stand out that make it such an attraction. For one, the 390-foot tower can see seen from all over the city. Climb to the top of the spire to see the tiled roof. The colorful tiles are laid out in such a way as to create pictures. Take the tour through the catacombs and see neat stacks of skulls and bones, open Monday through Saturday, 9-11:30a.m., and 12:30-4:30p.m. Sunday 1-4:30p.m. Tours begin every 30 minutes and cost 40 ATS.

Hofburg (Imperial Palace)
A-1015 Vienna, Austria
Many Austrian rulers have made their own input on the shape and style of this palace since Rudolf I took control of it in 1278. It now principally contains several museums and points of interest, some of which are listed below. Open everyday 9a.m. through 5p.m., 60 ATS)

Schatzkammer
A-1015 Vienna, Austria
The impressive museum contains the Royal treasury, which includes the 10th centuryn crown of the Holy Roman Emperor and a lance, which legend says is the one that pierced Jesus’ side (actually only 1000 years old).

Burgkapelle (Palace Chapel)
This small room is where the World Famous Vienna Boys’ Choir sings for Mass. Obtian free tickets for standing room only from 8:30a.m. September through June. Sundays at 9:15a.m.

Spanish Riding School
Michaelpl. 1, Hofburg, A-1010 Vienna
Tel: +43 1 533 9032
This is where the famous Lippizaner horses train and perform dressage. While the school is closed in July and August, make an effort to see their shows and training sessions. Tickets are 240-800 ATS for a seat, and 190 for standing room only. Training sessions are Tuesday through Saturday, 10a.m. to noon. Tickets are 100 ATS. Be sure to reserve in advance.

Donau Insel
This 8 mile long island is located in the middle of the Danube. Originally built for flood control, it is currently dedicated to leisure activities. Nom motor traffic is allowed on the island, but it is easy to reach on foot or bicycle. The U1 subway also serves the island. From here, you can see the third headquarters of the United Nations. During the summer, Viennese escape the city and head to the island for some sun and fresh air.

Karlskirche (St Charles’ Church)
Karlspl., Vienna
This famous Baroque landmark dominates Karlsplatz. Emperor Karl IV commissioned Austria’s best architect, Fischer von Erlach, to build this monument to the eradication of the plague in 1713.

Schloss Belvedere (Building)
3 Prinz-Eugen-Strasse 27, A-1037 Vienna
Tel: +43 1 795 570
Lukas von Hildebrandt built this palace for Prince Eugene of Savoy between 1714 and 1723. The structure is actually two baroque buildings separated by 500 meters of gardens. It now stands as a museum displaying the royal apartments, gardens, and art galleries. Many people flock to these buildings, since Klimt, Schiele, and Kokoschka all had a room here. Open Tuesday through Sunday 10a.m. through 5p.m. Admission to the buildings are 60 ATS.

Hundertwasserhaus
Tram N to Hetzgasse from Schwedenplatz U-Bahn
This building is by far Vienna’s most unusual apartment building, and a popular tourist destination. Architect Friendensreich Hundertwasser built this childlike house, keeping in mind that “the straight line is godless.” Hundertwasser also designed the garbage-burning tower in the ninth district. Look for the golden onion pierced on the blue tower.

Freud’s Apartment
Berggasse 19, A-1090 Vienna
Tel: +43 1 319 1596
Sigmund Freud moved to this apartment with his family in 1891, and lived here until 1938, when he felt to London. Freud took most of his possessions with him, but the building is still a major point of pilgrimage. Open July through September, 9a.m. to 6p.m. October through June, 9a.m. to 4p.m. Admission is 60 ATS.

Kunsthistorisches Museum
Maria-Theresien Pl., Vienna
Tel: +43 1 525 240
With impressive exhibits of Egyptian, Greek, Roman collections, German renaissance, and paintings by Rubens, Velázquez, Rembrandt, and Caravaggio, this museum stands as one of the best in the world. The real crowds, however, come of the collection of Bruegel the Elder. Open Tuesday through Sunday, 10a.m. to 6p.m., and Thursday 10a.m. to 9p.m. Admission is 100 ATS.

Prater
U-Bahn Praterstern
This large segment of parkland offers a glince at a slightly seedly but nevertheless interesting side of Vienna. There you can visit the Riesenrad and ride one of the oldest Ferris Wheels in the world. Operating hours vary throughout the year, but the park generally opens at 9a.m. and closes between 10 p.m. and midnight.

Staatsoper, 1
Opernring 2, Vienna
Tel: +43 1 514 442969
Catch High-class opera and ballet here in what people consider to be one of the best opera houses in the world. Other venues include Musikverein “Elizabeth”1, Karlsplatz, home of the Vienna Hilharmonic, and Konzerthaus, 3, Lothringerstrasse 50. Volksoper, 9, Währingerstrasse 78, is good for slightly-kitschy operetta. Check schedules and buy tickets at Bundestheaterkassen 1, and Hanuschgasse 3.

UNO-City – Vienna International Center
Wagramer Strasse 3-5
1220 Wien
+43-1-26060-3328
Fax: +43-1-26060-5899
This group offers tours of the city specifically for children. Best of all, the tours are available in languages besides German.

Schloss Schönbrunn Schönbrunner Schloss-strasse, A-1130 Vienna
Tel: +43 1 811 13
The biggest attraction in the Western part of Vienna is the summer palace. Sometimes called the “Versailles of Vienna”, this huge Baroque residence has more then 1400 rooms and grand formal gardens. Two tours that guide visitors through 100+ rooms are available. However, the palace itself is a minor attraction compared to the entire property. The palace grounds also include a terrific zoo, marvelous tree-covered paths, and Roman ruin Follies. Open from Nov – Mar, daily 08:30 – 16:30 and from Apr – Oct, daily 08:30 – 17:00.

St Stephen’s Cathedral (Building, view map)
Stephanspl., A-1010 Vienna
Tel: +43 1 515 52526
St. Stephan’s gothic structure seems a little out of place among the modern glass and steel buildings lining the Stephansplatz. However, it’s the things that stand out that make it such an attraction. For one, the 390-foot tower can see seen from all over the city. Climb to the top of the spire to see the tiled roof. The colorful tiles are laid out in such a way as to create pictures. Take the tour through the catacombs and see neat stacks of skulls and bones, open Monday through Saturday, 9-11:30a.m., and 12:30-4:30p.m. Sunday 1-4:30p.m. Tours begin every 30 minutes and cost 40 ATS.

Schatzkammer
A-1015 Vienna, Austria
The impressive museum contains the Royal treasury, which includes the 10th centuryn crown of the Holy Roman Emperor and a lance, which legend says is the one that pierced Jesus’ side (actually only 1000 years old).

Spanish Riding School
Michaelpl. 1, Hofburg, A-1010 Vienna
Tel: +43 1 533 9032
This is where the famous Lippizaner horses train and perform dressage. While the school is closed in July and August, make an effort to see their shows and training sessions. Tickets are 240-800 ATS for a seat, and 190 for standing room only. Training sessions are Tuesday through Saturday, 10a.m. to noon. Tickets are 100 ATS. Be sure to reserve in advance.

Donau Insel
This 8 mile long island is located in the middle of the Danube. Originally built for flood control, it is currently dedicated to leisure activities. Nom motor traffic is allowed on the island, but it is easy to reach on foot or bicycle. The U1 subway also serves the island. From here, you can see the third headquarters of the United Nations. During the summer, Viennese escape the city and head to the island for some sun and fresh air.

Schloss Belvedere (Building)
3 Prinz-Eugen-Strasse 27, A-1037 Vienna
Tel: +43 1 795 570
Lukas von Hildebrandt built this palace for Prince Eugene of Savoy between 1714 and 1723. The structure is actually two baroque buildings separated by 500 meters of gardens. It now stands as a museum displaying the royal apartments, gardens, and art galleries. Many people flock to these buildings, since Klimt, Schiele, and Kokoschka all had a room here. Open Tuesday through Sunday 10a.m. through 5p.m. Admission to the buildings are 60 ATS.

Hundertwasserhaus
Tram N to Hetzgasse from Schwedenplatz U-Bahn
This building is by far Vienna’s most unusual apartment building, and a popular tourist destination. Architect Friendensreich Hundertwasser built this childlike house, keeping in mind that “the straight line is godless.” Hundertwasser also designed the garbage-burning tower in the ninth district. Look for the golden onion pierced on the blue tower.

Kunsthistorisches Museum
Maria-Theresien Pl., Vienna
Tel: +43 1 525 240
With impressive exhibits of Egyptian, Greek, Roman collections, German renaissance, and paintings by Rubens, Velázquez, Rembrandt, and Caravaggio, this museum stands as one of the best in the world. The real crowds, however, come of the collection of Bruegel the Elder. Open Tuesday through Sunday, 10a.m. to 6p.m., and Thursday 10a.m. to 9p.m. Admission is 100 ATS.

Prater
U-Bahn Praterstern
This large segment of parkland offers a glince at a slightly seedly but nevertheless interesting side of Vienna. There you can visit the Riesenrad and ride one of the oldest Ferris Wheels in the world. Operating hours vary throughout the year, but the park generally opens at 9a.m. and closes between 10 p.m. and midnight

January to February
Carnival
Balls take place at many beautiful locations across Vienna, including the Wiener Opernball on the last Thursday of February at the Staatsoper. This is considered the most important social event of the year.

Late January to Early March
Viennese Dream on Ice
Watch as skaters whisk around on the square in front of the City Hall.

May 1
The city celebrates the opening of the Prater.

May
Vienna Spring Marathon
Feel the need for a little exercise? The Vienna Marathon runs every year, taking runners through the most beautiful streets in the city. More Info

Mid-May to Mid-June
Wiener Festwochen
The city celebrates its achievements as a European art and music city with expositions of music, opera, films and other exhibitions. There is free admission to the opening ceremony at the Rathausplatz.

June to September
Schönbrunn Art Open Air
Fascinating musical events in the beautiful surroundings of the Schönbrunn castle.

Late June
Donauinselfest
Europe´s largest pop-music festival takes over Vienna for an entire weekend! Listen to hundreds of bands as you wander through the carnival atmosphere. Best of all, admission is free!

Early July
Jazz Festival Vienna
The Vienna Jazz Festival is held every year at the Staatoper and on Donau Insel, drawing acts and artists from all over the world. It has become one of the leading jazz events in the world. Visit www.viennajazz.og for more information.

July-August
Rathausplatz Classical Music Film Festival
Take advantage of this free festival! Kiosks offer up a good selection of international cuisine as you watch open air classical music films.

Mid-October
Viennale
Vienna’s film festival has beening drawing a large international crowd now for over 40 years. More Info

Mid-November to December
Christmas Markets
From the famous “Magic of Advent” and Viennese Christkindlmarkt at the Rathausplatz to the romantic Christmas markets at the Spittelberg and Schönbrunn castle.

November/December
Vienna holds an international equestrian and jumping tournament in the Wiener Stadthalle.

December 24th
Midnight Mass
Experience Viennese tradition by attending the midnight Christmas Eve mass at St. Stephen’s cathedral. Devout Catholics and others pack the building for a magical ceremony. Get there early for a seat. Of course, the mass is held in German.

December 31st
New Years Celebration
Vienna offers a tremendous party scene. With imperial balls, fireworks, and out-of-control street parties, New Years Eve offers something for everyone

We offer deeply discounted rates for Vienna travel vacation packages,
airline tickets, hotel rates and car rental services. Build your own trip now
through our travel products:

– Get cheap airline tickets from our “Seat Inventory” source, best price and
seats for your family.

– Find your cheap hotel rates from our “Best Rate Guarantee” at over 300000
global properties.

– Rent a car at the price you want to travel Vienna. We offer cheapest car
rental
service from wide selection of inventory rates

– Best travel deals for our cheap vacation packages or last minute travel
deals
. We offer best vacation package rates with deeply discounted prices (up to
70% of regular rates)

– Visit our home page for all travel deals such as:cheap airline tickets, hotel rates, car rental, vacation packages and tourist attractions. Why pay more? save your money now!

Cairo Travel Guide – Deals

Quick Links:

A – Overview

B – Attractions & Things To Do

C – Family Fun Attractions

D – Cairo Travel Deals

A – Overview

Cairo offers its visitors an incredible selection of shopping leisure, culture and attractions. Modern Cairo encompasses many former cities and their monuments; in fact the site of the city can be traced back to 4225 BC. But most visitors come to experience the spectacular monuments of ancient Egyptian culture. Cairo is world renowned for being the “jewel of the Nile.” This description is not very far from the truth, for Cairo presents their visitors with an experience to remember.

cairo overview

Cairo is a mix of people, buses, animal carts, music, fragrances and sand whirls. At the heart of the city is the ever-busy Tahrir Square. On the north side visitors can peruse the Egyptian Museum, and south is Old Cairo, the oldest Islamic and Christian part of the city. Old Cairo features he famous Khan el Khalili Bazaar and the Citadel. The great Pyramids, the Sphinx, Luxor and Abu-Simbel are all must see attractions. Visitors interested in a shopping excursion should make sure to stroll down to Talat Harb Street, one of Cairo’s major commercial outlets. When you need a break from hustle and bustle of Cairo’s dynamic city, try a round of golf on the famous Mena House. The Mena House features golf courses that overlook the Pyramids. Nile cruises; snorkeling and scuba diving in the Red Sea are also available for those wishing to leave dry land! For a thrilling afternoon be sure to stop by the Gezira Club and watch the horse races. Another site that will literally lift your spirits is Cairo Tower, a modern 187 meter-high tower with excellent views of the city. The Tower is provides a scenic view of the entire city. The rooftop of the Tower showcases a revolving restaurant.

Cairo comes alive at night! The best time to shop, eat, and just relax is after the sun has gone down over Cairo. There are many restaurants that specialize in Middle Eastern and international cuisine. The streets are also paved with quaint cafes. For a truly unique dining experience, visitors can dine in a floating restaurant on the Nile! Cairo is a city that seems to never sleep, everything from the streets to the shops in Cairo throb with life and activity.

B – Attractions & Things To Do

cairo attractions

Chaar-Hachamaim Synagogue
The Chaar-Hachamaim Synagogue is one of Cairo’s great hidden treasures. The synagogue features an interior of exquisite stained-glass windows that are believed to be from the 1900’sThe Jewish community sought refuge in Egypt, where they were regarded and protected as People of the Book.

Coptic Museum
Shara Mari Girgis
02-841-766
The museum features the largest collection of Coptic Christian artwork in Cairo. Dedicated to preserving the ancient trails of Christianity I Egypt. The museum features work from over a half millennium. The collections include pieces with a late-pharaonic/Greco-Roman style.

Egyptian Antiquities Museum
al-Mathaf al-Masri Maydan Tahrir
02-754-319
The world’s largest collection of ancient Egyptian artifacts can be found within the walls of the Egyptian Antiquities Museum. Housing more than 100,000 items, you will have to be selective as to what exhibits you will tour. Two-hour tours are available and are led by official museum guides.

Gayer-Anderson Museum
4 Maydan Ibn Tulun
02-364-7822
Also known as Bayt al-Kiritliya, the structure of the museums made up of two Ottoman houses joined together. It is a grand representation of Ottoman buildings. 18th-century merchant life is depicted in the museum. After spending some time in the museum, you will feel as if you have been transported to a different era.

Mosque and Madrasa of Sultan Hassan
Maydan Salah al-Di
Built by the Mamluk ruler Sultan Hassan, this mosque is world-renowned as one of the largest Islamic religious buildings. It is said that the stones surrounding the Mosque actually came from the pyramids at Giza. A topic of controversy among Muslims is the location of the mausoleum. The position of the mausoleum inadvertinly forces worshipers, who come to pray, to bow before the tomb of the sultan.

Mosque of Ibn Tulun
Shara Tulun Bay
Built in 879 by Ahmad Ibn Tulun this is only one of Tulun’s building projects. He also set up to build a new city, al-Qata’i, northwest of al-Fustat and al-Askar. Although extraordinary in its assortment of fine palaces, gardens – however, all that stands is the Mosque.

Museum of Islamic Arts
Countering the Coptic Museum, the Museum of Islamic Arts possesses the rarest and most extensive collection of Islamic art in the world. The collection focuses mainly on Egyptian artifacts, but there are also many exhibits that feature other Islamic world objects. One of the most unique and ancient objects found in the museum is the said to be the earliest Muslim tombstones (dating back to 635).

The Hanging Church
Shara Mari Girgis
Consecrated to the Blessed Virgin sometime in the 9th century. The church was originally placed upon the gatehouse of the Roman fortress. It is perhaps one of Cairo’s most impressive churches. Inside the church there is a marble pulpit that is considered one of he oldest existing pulpit in not only Cairo, but also Egypt.

The Khan
Since the end of the 14th century, the Khan has remained the most vital for commercial activity in Cairo. Winding streets and narrow passageways make up this shopping extravaganza. Bazaar, vendors, and small shops make up the setting of this district. Just about everything from carpets to perfumes to spices is sold her.

Child Museum
Science, technology, imagination, history all make up this incredible world for kids. The “Discovery Hall” is one section of the Activity Center. It features activities in which children can discover different elements from the environment, such as precious stones, fossils and shells. Next comes the “Handicrafts and Arts Hall. It displays the ancient artesanies and various crafts, such as drawing on wood or leather with paint and water colors, weaving on carpet looms, or painting on glass and cardboard. The “Know yourself” division allows children to investigate skeletons and the internal human body parts.

The Museum Park
The park surrounding the Child Museum flows with an abundance of trees and plant species. Information on every species is posted for children to read and compare as they tour the park. A Bird watching tour is also available. Here children can observe birds in their natural environment through the use of binoculars. Magnifying glasses are also used in a tour for children to observe the behavior of ants, bees and other insects.

Cairo Tower
Rising 187m above Gezira Cairo Tower offers a stupendous view of the pulsating city. Catch a panoramic vista of Cairo!

The Bent Pyramid
What makes this pyramid unique is that it rises more steeply (54.3°) than the Red
Pyramid or Giza pyramids. The explanation for its shape is unknown. Another puzzling fact is the two entrances, one on its west side as well as the more conventional one in its north face. Again, the reason is unknown – perhaps another mystery to solve!

C – Family Fun Attractions

Egyptian Antiquities Museum
al-Mathaf al-Masri Maydan Tahrir
02-754-319
The world’s largest collection of ancient Egyptian artifacts can be found within the walls of the Egyptian Antiquities Museum. Housing more than 100,000 items, you will have to be selective as to what exhibits you will tour. Two-hour tours are available and are led by official museum guides.

Child Museum
Science, technology, imagination, history all make up this incredible world for kids. The “Discovery Hall” is one section of the Activity Center. It features activities in which children can discover different elements from the environment, such as precious stones, fossils and shells. Next comes the “Handicrafts and Arts Hall. It displays the ancient artesanies and various crafts, such as drawing on wood or leather with paint and water colors, weaving on carpet looms, or painting on glass and cardboard. The “Know yourself” division allows children to investigate skeletons and the internal human body parts.

The Museum Park
The park surrounding the Child Museum flows with an abundance of trees and plant species. Information on every species is posted for children to read and compare as they tour the park. A Bird watching tour is also available. Here children can observe birds in their natural environment through the use of binoculars. Magnifying glasses are also used in a tour for children to observe the behavior of ants, bees and other insects.

The Bent Pyramid
What makes this pyramid unique is that it rises more steeply (54.3°) than the Red
Pyramid or Giza pyramids. The explanation for its shape is unknown. Another puzzling fact is the two entrances, one on its west side as well as the more conventional one in its north face. Again, the reason is unknown – perhaps another mystery to solve!

D – Cairo Travel Deals

We offer deeply discounted rates for Cairo travel vacation packages,
airline tickets, hotel rates and car rental services. Build your own trip now
through our travel products:

– Get cheap airline tickets from our “Seat Inventory” source, best price and
seats for your family.

– Find your cheap hotel rates from our “Best Rate Guarantee” at over 300000
global properties.

– Rent a car at the price you want to travel Cairo. We offer cheapest car
rental
service from wide selection of inventory rates

– Best travel deals for our cheap vacation packages or last minute travel
deals
. We offer best vacation package rates with deeply discounted prices (up to
70% of regular rates)

– Visit our home page for all travel deals such as:cheap airline tickets, hotel rates, car rental, vacation packages and tourist attractions. Why pay more? save your money now!

St. Thomas Travel Deals – Guide

underwater observatory marin park eilatQuick Links:

A – Overview

B – City information

C – Attractions & Things To Do

D – Family Fun Attractions

E – Events & Entertainments

F – St. Thomas Travel Deals

A – Overview

The three islands and the 60 cays that comprise the US Virgin Islands include some of the most magnificent coast on earth. The area is host to nearly two million vacationers each year. Most of the islands, cays and jutting rocks that make up the territory are clustered around the 30 square mile island of St Thomas which lies 1000 miles south of Miami, 75 miles east of Puerto Rico and just southwest of the British Virgin Islands.

st thomas overview

St. Thomas has a year round temperature averaging 78°F. The ever-present trade winds keep the air from being unbearably hot. In addition, the region reports lower humidity levels than many of the other places in the Caribbean, making it a vacation paradise in both summer and winter. On nearly any day of the year, there are many hours of sunshine. Rain showers do come, but they’re usually a welcome relief and pass quickly.

St. Thomas is the busiest cruise ship harbor in the West Indies. The cruise from the US to St. Thomas is as enjoyable as the time spent at this idyllic destination. Busy Charlotte Amalie ( uh-MAL-ya: named for the wife of King Christian V in 1691), at the heart of the island is the capital of the U.S. Virgin Islands, and it remains the shopping hub of the Caribbean. The beaches on this island are renowned for their white sand and calm, turquoise waters. National Geographic rated the island as one of the top destinations in the world for sailing, scuba diving, and fishing.

Charlotte Amalie, with its white houses and bright red roofs glistening in the sun, is one of the most beautiful towns in the Caribbean. The town is also filled with historic sights like Fort Christian, an intriguing 17th-century building constructed by the Danes. The town’s architecture reflects the island’s culturally diverse past. A walk through town reveals its international heritage. You will pass Dutch doors, Danish red-tile roofs, French iron grillwork, and Spanish-style patios.

Charlotte Amalie, the capital of St. Thomas, is the only town on the island. Its seaside promenade is called Waterfront Highway or simply, the Waterfront. From there, it is easy to follow any of the streets or alleyways into town to Main Street or Dronningens Gade. Principal links between Main Street and the Waterfront include Raadets Gade, Tolbod Gade, Store Tvaer Gade, and Strand Gade. The capital is known for its delightful shops and patios, winding streets, and Old World Continental flavor.

The Father of the Impressionists, Camille Pissarro, was born on St Thomas in 1830. Though he spent most of his life in Paris he’s still thought of fondly as a native son. The Dronningens Gade house where he was born is open to the public. The epicenter of Virgin Islands art is the Tillet Gardens Arts Center, a complex of studios, classrooms and galleries in a lovely setting northeast of Charlotte Amalie on St. Thomas.

Main Street is home to all the major shops. The western end (near the intersection with Strand Gade) is known as Market Square, once the site of the biggest slave market auctions in the Caribbean Basin. Today, it’s an open-air cluster of stalls where native farmers and gardeners gather daily (except Sunday) to peddle their produce. Go early in the morning to see the market at its best.

You’ll find an eclectic mix of cuisines on St. Thomas, including American, Italian, Mexican, and Asian. Local Caribbean dishes include seafood specialties like “ole wife” and yellowtail, which are usually prepared with a spicy Creole mixture of peppers, onions, and tomatoes. A popular native side dishes is fungi (pronounced foon-gee), made with okra and cornmeal. Most local restaurants serve johnnycake, a popular fried, unleavened bread.

Because of St. Thomas’s thriving commercial activity, the atmosphere is one of vitality and zest for living. Varied nightlife and a resort atmosphere make St. Thomas the liveliest of the U.S. Virgin Islands. Those seeking seclusion can easily find it, however, at a hotel in more remote sections of the island. Hotels on the north side of St. Thomas look out at the Atlantic; those on the south side front the calmer Caribbean Sea.

The landscape includes dense subtropical forests, arid stretches dominated by succulents and coastal mangrove swamps. Indigenous trees include kapok, whose silky seedpod fiber was used as stuffing in pillows and lifejackets; calabash and the teylerpalm, whose delicate fronds make good brooms and were once used to construct fish traps. Madagascan flame trees brighten the vista along with bougainvillea, jasmine and frangipani.

The images gleaned from picture postcards assault the senses in their reality as your ship approaches St. Thomas: stretches of beach flair into the distance, and white sails skim across water so blue and clear it defies description. Red roofed houses color the green hillsides as do the orange of the flamboyant trees, the red of the hibiscus, the magenta of the bougainvillea, and the blue stone ruins of old sugar mills. Towns of pastel-tone villas, decorated with filigree wrought-iron terraces, line narrow streets that climb from the harbor. Yes, this is paradise!

B – City information

Population:
St Thomas 54,000

Capital city:
Charlotte Amalie

People:
African descent (75%), US mainland expatriates (13%), Puerto Rican (5%), Danish, French

Language:
English, plus some Creole, Spanish and French

Religion:
Baptist (42%), Catholic (42%), Episcopalian (17%)

Government:
Unincorporated territory of the US

Major industries:
Tourism, oil refining

Major trading partners:
USA, Puerto Rico

Time Zone:
Atlantic Time Zone. Daylight saving time not observed. Otherwise, it is the same as Eastern Standard Time.

Average Temperatures (In Fahrenheit):

  High Low
January – March 86F 67F
April – June 89F 70F
July – September 90F 73F
October – December 88F 69F

Health risks:
Sunburn: Be sure to apply sunblock or sunscreen often.

Electricity:
110-120V, 60Hz US appliances will work with no adapter.

Weights & measures:
Imperial

Telephones:
From North America, dial 1 + 340 + the seven-digit local number. Elsewhere, dial your country’s international direct dialing prefix + 1 + 340 + the seven-digit local number.

When to Go:
The peak tourist season is between December and April, but this has more to do with the weather in North America and Europe than it does with the reliably balmy Virgin Islands’ weather. It’s therefore best to visit outside this period, when you can expect room rates to be almost half those charged during the busier months. An additional draw is that the calmer weather between April and August tends to keep the waters clearer for diving.

Public Holidays:
1 January – New Year’s Day
Third Monday in January – Martin Luther King Jr Day
Third Monday in February – Presidents’ Day
Late March or April – Easter
Last Monday in May – Memorial Day
3 July – Emancipation Day
4 July – Independence Day
First Monday in September – Labor Day
Second Monday in October – Columbus Day, Virgin Islands Friendship Day
11 November – Veterans’ Day
Fourth Thursday in November – Thanksgiving
25 December – Christmas Day
26 December – Boxing Day

Currency:
US dollar (US$)

Banks:
Several major U.S. banks are represented on St. Thomas. Hours vary, but most are open Monday through Thursday from 9am to 2:30pm, Friday from 9am to 2pm, and 3:30 to 5pm.

Business Hours:
Typical business and store hours are Monday through Friday 9am to 5pm, Saturday 9am to 1pm. Some shops open Sunday for cruise-ship arrivals. Bars are usually open daily from 11am to midnight or 1am, although some hot spots stay open later.

Dentist:
The Virgin Island Dental Association ( 340/775-9110) is a member of the American Dental Association and is also linked with various specialists. Call for information or an appointment.

Doctor:
Doctors-on-Duty, Vitraco Park ( 340/776-7966) in Charlotte Amalie, is a reliable medical facility.

Drugstores:
For over-the-counter and prescription medications, go to Drug Farm, 2-4 9th St. 340/776-7098, or Havensight Pharmacy, Havensight Mall, Building #4 340/776-1235).

Electricity:
110 to 115 volts, 60 cycles, as on the U.S. mainland.

Emergencies:
Police, 911; ambulance, 922; fire, 921.

Hospitals:
The St. Thomas Hospital is at 48 Sugar Estate ( 340/776-8311), Charlotte Amalie.

Hotlines:
Call the police at 911 in case of emergency. If you have or witness a boating mishap, call the U.S. Coast Guard Rescue ( 787/729-6800, ext. 140), which operates out of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Scuba divers should note the number of a decompression chamber ( 340/776-8311) at the Roy Schneider Community Hospital on St. Thomas.

Laundry and Dry Cleaning:
The major hotels provide laundry service, but it’s more expensive than a laundromat. For dry cleaning go to One-Hour Martinizing, Barbel Plaza ( 340/774-5452), in Charlotte Amalie. A good full-service Laundromat is 4-Star Laundromat, 68 Kronprindsens Gade ( 340/774-8689), in Charlotte Amalie.

Liquor Laws:
Persons must be at least 21 years of age to patronize bars or purchase liquor in St. Thomas.

Newspapers and Magazines:
Copies of U.S. mainland newspapers, such as The New York Times, USA Today, and The Miami Herald, arrive daily in St. Thomas and are sold at hotels and newsstands. The latest copies of Time and Newsweek are also for sale. St. Thomas Daily News covers local, national, and international events. Virgin Islands Playground and St. Thomas This Week, both of which are packed with visitor information, are distributed free all over the island.

Post Office:
The main post office is at 9846 Estate Thomas ( 340/774-1950), Charlotte Amalie, open Monday through Friday from 7:30am to 5:30pm and Saturday from 7:30am to 2:30pm.

Rest Rooms:
You’ll find public toilets at beaches and at the airport, but they are limited in town. Most visitors use the facilities of a bar or restaurant.

Telephone, Telex, and Fax:
All island phone numbers have seven digits. It is not necessary to use the 340 area code when dialing within St. Thomas. Numbers for all three islands, including St. John and St. Croix, are found in the U.S. Virgin Islands phone book. Hotels will send faxes and telexes for you, usually for a small service charge. Make long distance, international, and collect calls as you would on the U.S. mainland.

Transit Information:
Call 340/774-7457 to order a taxi 24 hours a day. Call 340/774-5100 for airport information and 340/776-6282 for information about ferry departures for St. John.

Weather:
For weather reports, call Vietema at 340/774-2244.

Arriving By Plane:
If you’re flying to St. Thomas, you will land at the Cyril E. King Airport 340/774-5100, to the west of Charlotte Amalie on Route 30. From here, you can easily find a taxi to your hotel or villa. Chances are you will be staying east of Charlotte Amalie, so keep in mind that getting through town often involves long delays and traffic jams.

Nonstop flights to the U.S. Virgin Islands from New York and Atlanta take 3 3/4 and 3 1/2 hours, respectively. Flight time from Miami is about 2 1/2 hours.

Getting Around By Car:

Driving Rules
Always drive on the left. The speed limit is 20 m.p.h. in town, 35 m.p.h. outside town. Take extra caution when driving in St. Thomas, especially at night. Many roads are narrow, curvy, and poorly lit.

Renting A Car
There is no tax on car rentals in the Virgin Islands.

Warning
St. Thomas has a high accident rate. Visitors are not used to driving on the left, the hilly terrain shelters blind curves and entrance ramps, roads are narrow and poorly lit, and drivers often get behind the wheel after too many drinks. To be on the safe side, consider getting collision-damage insurance.

Parking
Because Charlotte Amalie is a labyrinth of congested one-way streets, don’t try to drive within town looking for a spot. If you can’t find a place to park along the waterfront (free), go to the sprawling lot to the east of Fort Christian, across from the Legislature Building. Parking fees are nominal here, and you can park your car and walk northwest toward Emancipation Park, or along the waterfront until you reach the shops and attractions.

Getting Around On Foot:
This is the only way to explore the heart of Charlotte Amalie. All the major attractions and the principal stores are within easy walking distance. However, other island attractions, like Coral World or Magens Bay, require a bus or taxi.

Getting Around By Bus:
St. Thomas has the best public transportation of any island in the U.S. chain. Buses, called Vitrans, leave from street-side stops in the center of Charlotte Amalie, fanning out east and west along all the most important highways. They run between 5:30am and 10:30pm daily, and you rarely have to wait more than 30 minutes during the day.. The service is safe, efficient, and comfortable. For schedule and bus stop information, call 340/774-5678.

Getting Around By Taxi:
Taxis are the major means of transportation on St. Thomas. They’re not metered, but fares are controlled and widely posted; however, we still recommend that you negotiate a fare with the driver before you get into the car. Surcharges are added after midnight. For 24-hour radio dispatch taxi service, call 340/774-7457.

Taxi vans transport 8 to 12 passengers to multiple destinations on the island. It’s cheaper to take a van instead of a taxi if you’re going between your hotel and the airport.

Visas:
No visas are required for citizens of the US and Canada, though you’ll have to prove citizenship by way of a birth certificate, voter’s registration card or valid passport. Most other nationalities don’t need a visa either, but will need a passport for a stay of less than 90 days. Proof of onward transportation is required upon entry

C – Attractions & Things To Do

Coral World Marine Park and Underwater Observatory:
6450 Coki Point
340/775-1555
A marine complex that features a three-story underwater observation tower 100 feet offshore. It’s a 20-minute drive from Charlotte Amalie off Route 38. Inside, you’ll see sponges, fish, coral, and other aquatic creatures in their natural state through picture windows.

 

Marine Gardens Aquarium:
Part of Coral World Marine Park;
Daily from 9 – 5:30
Admission charged.
Saltwater tanks display everything from sea horses to sea urchins. An 80,000-gallon reef tank features exotic marine life of the Caribbean; another tank is devoted to sea predators, with circling sharks and giant moray eels. Activities include daily fish and shark feedings and exotic bird shows. The latest addition to the park is a semisubmarine that lets you enjoy the panoramic view and the “down under” feeling of a submarine without truly submerging.

Coral World’s guests can take advantage of adjacent Coki Beach for snorkel rental, scuba lessons, or swimming and relaxing. Lockers and showers are available. Also included in the marine park are the Tropical Terrace Restaurant, duty-free shops, and a nature trail.

Estate St. Peter Greathouse Botanical Gardens:
At the corner of Route 40
6A St. Peter Mountain Rd. and Barrett Hill Road
340/774-4999
Daily 9 – 4;
Admission charged.
This complex consists of 11 acres set at the foot of volcanic peaks on the northern rim of the island. They are laced with self-guided nature walks that will acquaint you with some 200 varieties of West Indian plants and trees, including an umbrella plant from Madagascar. From a panoramic deck in the gardens you can see some 20 of the Virgin Islands, including Hans Lollick, an uninhabited island between Thatched Cay and Madahl Point. The house is filled with a display of local works of art.

Paradise Point Tramway:
Across from Havensight Mall and the cruise ship dock.
340-774-9809
Daily 8:30-5
Fee charged.
Gondolas transport passengers 700 feet up a mountainside to Paradise Point. The 3.5 minute ride offers views of the harbor and Charlotte Amalie.

Charlotte Amalie:
The color and charm of the Caribbean come to life in this waterfront town, the capital of St. Thomas, where most visitors begin their visit to the island. Old warehouses, once used for storing stolen pirate goods, have been converted to shops. In fact, the main streets, called “Gade” (a reflection of their Danish heritage), now merge into a virtual shopping mall. The streets are often packed. Sandwiched among these shops are a few historic buildings, most of which can be seen on foot in about 2 hours.

King’s Wharf
The site of the Virgin Islands Legislature, which is housed in the apple-green military barracks dating from 1874.

Fort Christian
340/776-4566
Named after the Danish king Christian V, this structure was a governor’s residence, police station, court, and jail until it became a national historic landmark in 1977. A museum here illuminates the island’s history and culture. Cultural workshops and turn-of-the-century furnishings are just some of the exhibits you can expect to see. A museum shop features local crafts, maps, and prints. Fort Christian is open Monday through Friday from 8:30am to 4:30pm.

Emancipation Park
Where a proclamation freeing African slaves and indentured European servants was read on July 3, 1848. The park is now mostly a picnic area for local workers and visitors.

Grand Hotel
Near Emancipation Park, the Grand Hotel is a visitors center which dispenses valuable travel information about the island. When this hotel was opened in 1837, it was a grand address, but it later fell into decay, and finally closed in 1975. The former guest rooms upstairs have been turned into offices and a restaurant.

Frederik Lutheran Church
Built between 1780 and 1793. The original Georgian-style building, financed by a free black parishioner, Jean Reeneaus, was reconstructed in 1825 and again in 1870 after it was damaged in a hurricane.

Government House
The administrative headquarters for the U.S. Virgin Islands. It’s been the center of political life in the islands since it was built, around the time of the American Civil War. Visitors are allowed on the first two floors, Monday through Saturday from 8am to noon, and 1 to 5pm. Some paintings by former resident Camille Pissarro are on display, as are works by other St. Thomas artists.

Seven Arches Museum
Government Hill
340/774-9295
Visitors enjoy visiting the private home of longtime residents Philibert Fluck and Barbara Demaras. This 200 year Danish house has been completely restored and furnished with antiques. Walk through the yellow ballast arches into the Great Room, which has a great view of the Caribbean’s busiest harbor. Admission fee includes a cold tropical drink served in a beautiful walled flower garden. Open Tuesday – Sunday from 10 – 3, or by appointment.

Frederik Church Parsonage
Next to the Government House. Dating from 1725, and one of the oldest houses on the island. It’s the only structure in the Government Hill district to retain its simple 18th century lines.

Yellow-Brick Building
Built in 1854 in what local architects called “the style of Copenhagen.” You can go inside and browse through the many shops within.

99 Steps
These steps, which were erected in the early 1700s, take you to the summit of Government Hill, from where you’ll see the 18th-century Crown House, immediately to your right on the south side of the street. This stately private house was the home of von Scholten, the Danish ruler who issued the famous proclamation of emancipation in 1848 .

St. Thomas Reformed Church
Dating from 1844. Much of its original structure, which was designed like a Greek temple, has been preserved intact.

St. Thomas Synagogue
340/774-4312
The oldest synagogue in continuous use under the American flag and the second oldest in the Western Hemisphere; it was erected in 1833 by Sephardic Jews, and it still maintains the tradition of having sand on the floor, commemorating the exodus from Egypt. The structure was built of local stone along with ballast brick from Denmark and mortar made of molasses and sand. It’s open to visitors from 9am to 4pm, Monday through Friday. Next door, the Weibel Museum showcases 300 years of Jewish history. It keeps the same hours.

Enid M. Baa Public Library
Formerly the von Bretton House, dating from 1818.

Market Square
Officially known as Rothschild Francis Square. This was the center of a large slave-trading market before the 1848 emancipation. Today it’s an open-air fruit and vegetable market, selling, among other items, genips (to eat one, break open the skin and suck the pulp off a pit). The wrought-iron roof covered a railway station at the turn of the century. The market is open Monday through Saturday, its busiest day.

The Waterfront (Kyst Vejen)
Where you can purchase a fresh coconut. One of the vendors will whack off the top with a machete, so you can drink the sweet milk from its hull.

Fort Christian
The town’s top ranking historic attraction; a modest red structure that looks to be lacking in strength. The building dates to the 1670s when it served as a combined defense post, government house, church and community hall. When the threat of invasion dissipated, the fort became a jail and, since 1987, a museum with displays on the region’s natural heritage (including medicinal plants and bird life) and art.

Market Square
Today the covered plaza is the local food market but it was once the Caribbean’s busiest trading post for slaves.

Those craving peace and privacy are better off heading to the nearby uninhabited islets of Hassel Island and Great Outlying Neighborhoods

 

The most important of the outlying neighborhoods is Frenchtown. Some of the older islanders still speak a distinctive Norman-French dialect here. Since the heart of Charlotte Amalie is dangerous at night, Frenchtown, with its finer restaurants and interesting bars, has become the place to go after dark.

 

 

Another neighborhood is Frenchman’s Hill. The Huguenots built many old stone villas there, and they open onto panoramic views of the town and its harbor.

 

Nightlife:

Theater

Reichhold Center For The Arts
Rte. 30, across from Brewers Beach
340/693-1559.
This amphitheater has its more expensive seats covered by a roof. Schedules vary, so check the paper to see what’s on when you’re in town. Throughout the year there’s an entertaining mix of local plays, dance exhibitions, and music of all types

D – Family Fun Attractions

Coral World Marine Park and Underwater Observatory
6450 Coki Point
340/775-1555
A marine complex that features a three-story underwater observation tower 100 feet offshore. It’s a 20-minute drive from Charlotte Amalie off Route 38. Inside, you’ll see sponges, fish, coral, and other aquatic creatures in their natural state through picture windows.

Marine Gardens Aquarium
Part of Coral World Marine Park;
Daily from 9 – 5:30
Admission charged.
Saltwater tanks display everything from sea horses to sea urchins. An 80,000-gallon reef tank features exotic marine life of the Caribbean; another tank is devoted to sea predators, with circling sharks and giant moray eels. Activities include daily fish and shark feedings and exotic bird shows. The latest addition to the park is a semisubmarine that lets you enjoy the panoramic view and the “down under” feeling of a submarine without truly submerging.

Coral World’s guests can take advantage of adjacent Coki Beach for snorkel rental, scuba lessons, or swimming and relaxing. Lockers and showers are available. Also included in the marine park are the Tropical Terrace Restaurant, duty-free shops, and a nature trail.

Estate St. Peter Greathouse Botanical Gardens
At the corner of Route 40
6A St. Peter Mountain Rd. and Barrett Hill Road
340/774-4999
Daily 9 – 4;
Admission charged.
This complex consists of 11 acres set at the foot of volcanic peaks on the northern rim of the island. They are laced with self-guided nature walks that will acquaint you with some 200 varieties of West Indian plants and trees, including an umbrella plant from Madagascar. From a panoramic deck in the gardens you can see some 20 of the Virgin Islands, including Hans Lollick, an uninhabited island between Thatched Cay and Madahl Point. The house is filled with a display of local works of art

E – Events & Entertainments

March

Transfer Day (31 March)
Commemorates the 1917 handover of the islands from Denmark to the US.

April

Carnival on St Thomas:
A crazy week full of masquerades, drumming, dancing, feasting and mocko jumbies (costumed stiltwalkers). Unlike other Carnivals in the Caribbean, which precede Lent, St Thomas’ takes place after Easter, usually in late April

The St Thomas Yacht Club’s International Regatta
churns up the waters every April.

July

Christmas in July:
when Santa dances on the streets of Charlotte Amalie with the tallest elves you’ve ever seen.

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