Category: Lautoka

Lautoka Travel Guide – Deals

Quick Links:

A – Overview

B – City information

C – Attractions & Things To Do

D – Family Fun Attractions

E – Events & Entertainments

F – Lautoka Travel Deals

A – Overview

Sparkling white sand beaches, blue skies, coral reefs resplendent with marine life, and total relaxation in a lush, tropical setting.  These are the basic elements of a vacation in the islands of Fiji.  Fiji is very much untouched by the outside world and, in places; life has changed very little for centuries. About 90% of Fijians still live in villages in the countryside and the power of the vanua (one’s land and family ties) is still the most important cultural force.  Village communities own land in common through extended family units known as Matagli. Everything in the village is shared, and individual ownership is not understood or practiced.  Each village has a chief who is governed by a higher chief. 

 Lautoka overview

By contrast, Fiji’s capital, city, Suva, is the largest city in Melanesia and, after Auckland and Honolulu, the largest in the Pacific region. Suva is a cosmopolitan port city with a vibrant multi-cultural mix and many residents from other Pacific islands, including students at the University of the South Pacific. 

 

Suva is the only real urban centre in Fiji and is home to some interesting British colonial architecture. (Fiji was a British Crown colony from 1874-1970).  Suva’s attractions include colorful markets, the Thurston Botanical Gardens, the  Fiji Museum, the Presidential Palace, and Parliament.

 

The other deep water port in Fiji is the city of Lautoka. Lautoka is bordered by the blue Pacific Ocean on the western side and green gold sugar cane together with forests of pine trees on the other sides.  Laukota  is an important hub for Fiji’s sugar cane and timber industries and is a jumping off point for the resorts on islands in the Yasawa group where the best beaches can be found.

 

Spectacular views and historical sites can be found in Viti Levu’s largest native rainforest just 30 minutes from Lautoka.  Viti Levu at 4052 square miles, and Vanua Levu at 2160 square miles are the largest of the islands. Suva, the country’s capital is on the south-western coast of Viti Levu. The islands of Taveuni and Kadavu are also substantial in size, but the rest of the country is made up of small islands divided into the Lomaiviti, Lau, Moala, Yasawa, Mamanuca and Rotuma groups. Many of these islands are relatively untouched, and there are many beautiful reefs, lagoons, harbors, as well as natural vegetation.

 

Visitors can explore the ruins of a fascinating pre-European hill used as a battle fortification, or wander through a colonial town that has changed little in over 150 years.  It is as if time stands still or no longer matters. 

 

The Fiji islands are situated in the South Pacific, midway between Melanesia (Solomons, Vanuatu, New Caledonia and Papua New Guinea) and Polynesia (Tonga, Samoa, the Cooks and French Polynesia). They are south of the equator, just north of the Tropic of Capricorn and west of the International Dateline. About 300 islands make up the nation.

 

Thirty minutes from Lautoka, Abaca is a trekkers paradise with a wide range of trails set in a landscape of black volcanic mountains, green cloud forest and yellow grasslands. Abaca has barbecue facilities; swimming holes, a 12-bed lodge, and authentic handicrafts.  Tours with commentaries on the history and culture of the area are available. Rock climbers can make arrangements to tackle the many different cliff faces only a short distance from the lodge.

 

There are about 100 bird species, 23 of which are native. Sea life is abundant and varied, and many species of coral, sponges, tropical reef fish, rays, sharks, dolphins and whales call the Fijian waters home.

 

Most travelers go to Fiji with plans to do some swimming, snorkeling or diving, and Fiji offers these as well as some excellent surfing, river rafting, wind surfing and sailing. There are fringing reefs throughout the islands for the best in  diving and snorkeling. The Mamanucas have some dedicated surfing resorts and good waves but you need a boat to get to the offshore reefs where they break. There are also a few good breaks off Viti Levu including those near Sigatoka and the Suva lighthouse, and off Yanuca island.

 

On dry land you can enjoy cycling, trekking and horseback riding, or do some bird-watching and exploring of archaeological sites. Fiji is well equipped for tourists, and there are facilities everywhere offering equipment for hire, day tours and courses.

 

Dance is still strong in Fiji and the narrative meke performances rest on strong oral traditions. Dances are passed down from generation to generation, and in their strict forms the dancers’ bodies are said to take on spirits of the netherworld. Mekes accompanied special events like births, deaths, calls to war, marriages and property exchanges. At times of war men would perform cibis with spears and clubs, while women performed deles or wates – dances which sexually humiliated enemy captives. Traditional Indian dances are still taught in Indian communities.

 

Popular local musical artists include Seru Serevi, Danny Costello, Michelle Rounds, Karuna Gopalan, Laisa Vulakoro, the Freelancers and the Black Roses. Recordings of local music are available in Fijian stores. Music from the so called  ‘Bollywood’ films (Indian melodramas) is popular amongst Fijian Indians, and local bands play Indian songs. At Indian cultural centers performances and lessons are given in traditional Indian music featuring vocal, harmonium, tabla, and sitar ensembles.

 

Fiji is a land of ancient rituals, such as the yaqona ceremony, which is still enacted as it has been for centuries. Visitors, who are regarded as honored guests, are often welcomed to take part in these solemn occasions. The Fijian culture is based on the well-being of extended families where the interests of the group are always regarded as above those of the individual.  It is easy to become immersed in the beauty and the history that surrounds all who enter this fascinating place.   There is much to learn for those who want to come and experience the real Fiji and to discover first hand its beauty, its culture, and its welcoming people

B – City information

Population

Suva:  358,495

Lautoka:  32,000

Tourism: 300,000 visitors per year

Time: GMT/UTC plus 12 hours

 

Average Temperatures:

 

 Month  

   High

 Low

January  

   86F  

  74F

February

   86F

  74F

March  

   86F  

  74F

April  

   84F

  73F  

May  

   82F

  71F  

June  

   80F

  69F 

July  

   79F

  68F  

August  

   79F  

  68F

September  

   80F

  69F

October  

   81F

  70F

November  

   83F

  71F

December  

   85F

  73F

 

When to Visit

Its mild tropical climate means that Fiji can be enjoyed all year round.  It is a popular escape from the winters in both the northern and southern hemispheres. Perhaps the best time to go, however, is in the dry season or ‘Fiji winter’, from May to October. This time of year has cooler temperatures, less rainfall and humidity, and less risk of tropical cyclones. Tropical cyclones can blow up between November and April, although they are rarely dangerous.  The prevailing winds are easterly and south-easterly; the mountainous spines of the larger islands produce clouds and greater rainfall on their windward sides. The wet season extends from November to April, but rain falls throughout the year. Daytime temperatures average around 25°C (77°F), and humidity is generally high.

 

Arriving

By Air

Nadi International Airport is Fiji’s main international gateway. Over 1.2 million international passengers, pass through its doors annually. Lautoka is situated in the western side of Viti Levu, the largest island in Fiji. It is only 25 km away (toward the north) from Nadi International Airport.

Nausori Airport is the second International Airport in Fiji situated on the Eastern Side of the main Island of Viti Levu. Nausori Airport is a thirty minute drive from the country’s capital, Suva.

Airlines operate twice weekly to Auckland and Sydney and there are also weekly flights connecting to the islands of Nuku’alofa and Funafuti.

Airports Fiji Limited manages and operates 13 smaller airstrips on the outer islands of Fiji besides the two main international airports at Nadi and Nausori.

These are Labasa, Savusavu, Matei, Rotuma, Koro, Gau, Bureta, Vanuabalavu, Lakeba, Cicia, Moala and Kadavu.

Matei Airport is located on Taveuni, a volcanic island situated on the North East of the Fiji Group, through which the International Dateline passes. Taveuni is widely known as the Garden Island of Fiji, with some of the most unique flora in the world and a lake at the crater of its highest peak. A number of exclusive resorts are dotted along its coastline

 

By Cruise Ship:  Both Suva and Lautoka have deep water ports and cruise ships put into port at both locations.

Visas: Most travelers will automatically be issued a four week tourist visa upon arrival. This includes travelers from most Commonwealth countries, most North, South and Central American countries, Western Europe, Israel and Japan. The visa is issued free of charge and you won’t have to pay for any subsequent extensions.

Electricity: 240V, 50 Hz

Weights & measures: Metric

Shopping

The city has a wide range of shops ranging from retail to wholesale. The retail outlets have basically for all items such as food, clothing, duty free items, sporting equipment, medicines, tailoring, drapery, video rental, liquor outlets and more.

Hours of Operation

Some shops open as early as 6.00am and others from 8.00 -6.00pm or 7.00pm during the week-days and on Saturday from 7.00am 1.00pm.   On Sundays and Public Holidays the shops are generally closed but the restaurants, milk bars and other essential shops remain open.

Banks

The city has five commercial banks and one exchange & Finance Company.

Getting Around

Both taxis and buses are available at both locations (Suva and Lautoka).

C – Attractions & Things To Do

Fiji Highlights

 lautoka-attractions

Lautoka

Municipal Market

The city’s municipal market has a floor area of about 58,000 meters and is filled with local people selling produce outside and inside.

 

The shopping centre is conveniently located in the central city area along Vitogo Parade, Naviti Street and Yasawa Street.

 

The city has a very wide range of shops ranging from retail to wholesale.  Some shops open as early as  6.00am and others from 8.00 -6.00pm or 7.00pm during the week-days and on Saturday from 7.00am 1.00pm.   On Sundays and Public Holidays the shops are usually closed but the restaurants, milk bars and other essential shops remain open.

 

There are all types of restaurants with a variety of dishes such as Chinese, Indian, Italian, Fijian, European, Korean, vegetarian, snack bars, etc.

 

The following sports venues are in Lautoka:

(1)Golf (Lautoka Golf Club)

(2)Soccer/ Rugby/ Cricket/ Hockey (facilities provided by Lautoka City Council at Churchill Park

Nadovu Park and at other playing fields all round the city).

(3)Netball/ Volleyball/ Basketball & Tennis (Lautoka City Council’s Multipurpose Courts).

 

Suva

Suva is Fiji’s administrative and political capital and is home to one-half of the country’s population.  It is the largest city in the South Pacific. 

Fiji‘s capital, is on the south-eastern coast of the big island of Viti Levu. While Nadi, in the west of this island, is the tourism centre of the country, Suva is interesting as the country’s political and administrative centre as well as the major port. Suva and its urban surrounds are home to half of Fiji’s urban population, and it is one of the South Pacific’s largest and most sophisticated cities, housing the University of the South Pacific, the  Fiji Museum and many interesting colonial-era buildings. It is a multicultural city with many mosques, temples, churches and cultural centres. The Roman Catholic Cathedral (1902) is one of the city’s most prominent landmarks.

 

Suva Municipal Market

Immerse yourself in the festive, friendly atmosphere of this wonderful street market, where you’ll find every tropical fruit and vegetable imaginable.

 

Parliament

Suva

330 5811

These impressive, orange-colored government buildings were modeled after traditional Fijian thatched huts, and the complex is open to visitors.

 

Municipal Handicraft Center

Suva

331 3433

Try your hand at bargaining for artifacts and handicrafts at these outdoor market stalls.

 

Colo-I-Suva Forest Park

Suva

(679) 3320211

Take a dip in one of the natural swimming pools, follow a nature trail and keep your ears and eyes ready to spot the numerous birds that inhabit this park.

 

Albert Park

Suva

This park was made famous when Charles Kingsford-Smith made an emergency landing here on his 1928 trans-Pacific flight.

 

Fiji Museum (“Na Vale Ni i Yaya Maroroi”)

Suva

679 331 5944

Open:  Mon-Thur: 9:30am – 4:00pm

Fri: 9:30am- 3.30pm

Sat & Public Holidays: 9:30am – 4:00pm; Sunday- Closed

Archaeological findings dating back 3500 years as well as cultural objects reflecting Fiji’s inhabitants during the past 100 years are housed in the oldest museum in the South Pacific.

 

Nadi

Fiji‘s third largest town is set against a mountainous backdrop on the west coast of Viti Levu. The local economy of Nadi relies almost totally on tourism.  In Nadi there are a wide range of accommodations from the simple to luxury resorts. Its Central Market offers traditional handicrafts including wood carved objects and textiles. There are a high proportion of Fiji Indians in Nadi, mostly fourth-generation descendants of the indentured laborers brought to Fiji from India during the colonial years to work in the canefields.

 

Sri Siva Subramaniya Swami Temple

Nadi

The Temple is located at the southern end of the main street. Visitors are welcome (but asked not to have consumed either alcohol or non-vegetarian food that day). There is a good market offering the usual  mix of Melanesian, Chinese and Indian produce. The main strip is filled with restaurants and shops selling clothes, souvenirs and duty-free goods. Nadi is also a good place for outdoor  activities:  everything from diving, golf, horse riding and rafting to riding in a jet-boat or light plane is available.

 

Mamanuca Group

The Mamanucas are a bunch of tiny islands just off the western coast of Viti Levu, and they are easily accessible by boat from Nadi, either as a day trip or to stay in one of the many luxury resorts or hostels. The islands are popular with divers, snorkellers, surfers and people who just want to lie about on open stretches of white-sand beach. The lovely reefs and colorful fish make snorkelling around these islands a highlight for many travelers. Only a few of the islands, such as  Monu and Monuriki, have significant areas of native forest left. These places are home to many birds and reptiles.

 

Sigatoka

Sigatoka is a small town on the southern coast of Viti Levu, 61km (38mi) south of Nadi and 127km (79mi) west of Suva on the banks of Fiji’s second-largest river. This is  principally a farming community, but is also a service town for the Coral Coast resorts.

Sigatoka is a good base for exploring the huge Sigatoka sand dunes nearby, and also the southern coast, and the Sigatoka Valley. The Sigatoka Valley is a highly fertile strip containing almost 200 cultural and archaeological sites, including the Tavuni Hill Fort, a series of defensive earth works built by the Tongan chief Maile Latemai in the 18th century. The valley is also home to some of Fiji’s best potters.

 

Kula Eco Park

Sigatoka, Fiji Islands

Ph: 679 – 6500 505

Fax: 679 6520 202

Kula is located on Queens Road, opposite the Outrigger Reef Resort east of Sigatoka town. Being Fiji’s only wildlife park, Kula is the breeding center for Fiji’s endangered species. The park provides free Environmental Hands-on Education to Fiji’s children. Visitors can spend hours observing parrots, lories, falcons, hawks, fruit bats, snakes, iguana and marine life plus learn of Fiji’s flora and fauna in near natural settings. Wander the rain forest or explore

The waterfront area is another place to shop, and the Suva Municipal Market is a must-see for visitors with its exotic fruits and vegetables, kava, fish and seafood, and spices. It has a multicultural flavor, with vendors selling brightly colored Indian sweets and candies, and fruit drinks from glass tanks.

 

Nausori Highlands

Due east from Nadi, in the interior of the Viti Levu island, are the fantastic landscapes and remote villages of the Nausori Highlands. The village of Navala is one of  the most picturesque in all Fiji. While most Fijian villages now use prefab concrete and corrugated iron, almost all of Navala’s homes and buildings are traditional bures arranged around avenues with a central promenade leading down to a river.

 

This is an isolated area.  The protocol is to ask to see the village chief, and then ask him if it is  all right to walk around the village and take some photos.  Sunday is not a good time as it is the day of worship and for spending time with the family. Bukuya village is further west and it too is a worthwhile excursion. There are simple accommodations available in the villages. 

 

Koroyanitu National Heritage Park

666 6644

Near Lautoka

Koroyanitu National Heritage Park is set in the steep hills above Nadi and is only 16 kms from Lautoka. You can explore the forests and waterfalls, picnic, take a swim in a mountain stream, go on short walks and overnight hikes or stay with the villagers and experience life in a Fijian highland community.

 

Native Crafts

Fijians still practice many traditional arts and crafts, some which have been modified and embellished to satisfy the demands of tourism. Fiji has been famous for pottery since the Lapita people began trading their wares thousands of years ago. The most famous of the contemporary potters are Dian Tugea and Taraivini Wati, both of whom are featured in the Fiji Museum. Wood carving is still important, perhaps mostly because of the steady tourist demand for souvenirs to take home. Fijian carvers make war clubs, spears and cannibal forks. Drinking bowls, or tanoas, are still in daily use in Fijian households. Carvings in areas that have a Polynesian influence (from Tongan and Samoan settlers) feature inlays of shell and bone.

 

Bark cloth, known in Fiji as masi, was traditionally made throughout the Pacific and was usually known as tapa. Ceremonial robes, waistbands, trains and turbans were once made from masi and the cloth was decorated with symbolic motifs in ochre-rusts and charcoal-blacks. The cloth is made from the bark of the mulberry tree and its production is very labourious. Traditionally, large and highly decorated masi cloths were used as ceremonial gifts and there was much prestige associated with their ownership. The weaving of pandanus leaves into mats and baskets has a long tradition, too. Most village girls still learn the craft, and there are many variations in style and colour (achieved by scraping the leaves, burying them in mud and boiling them with other plants).

D – Family Fun Attractions

Fiji Highlights

 

Lautoka

Municipal Market

The city’s municipal market has a floor area of about 58,000 meters and is filled with local people selling produce outside and inside.

 

The shopping centre is conveniently located in the central city area along Vitogo Parade, Naviti Street and Yasawa Street.

 

The city has a very wide range of shops ranging from retail to wholesale.  Some shops open as early as  6.00am and others from 8.00 -6.00pm or 7.00pm during the week-days and on Saturday from 7.00am 1.00pm.   On Sundays and Public Holidays the shops are usually closed but the restaurants, milk bars and other essential shops remain open.

 

There are all types of restaurants with a variety of dishes such as Chinese, Indian, Italian, Fijian, European, Korean, vegetarian, snack bars, etc.

 

The following sports venues are in Lautoka:

(1)Golf (Lautoka Golf Club)

(2)Soccer/ Rugby/ Cricket/ Hockey (facilities provided by Lautoka City Council at Churchill Park

Nadovu Park and at other playing fields all round the city).

(3)Netball/ Volleyball/ Basketball & Tennis (Lautoka City Council’s Multipurpose Courts).

 

Suva

Suva is Fiji’s administrative and political capital and is home to one-half of the country’s population.  It is the largest city in the South Pacific. 

Fiji‘s capital, is on the south-eastern coast of the big island of Viti Levu. While Nadi, in the west of this island, is the tourism centre of the country, Suva is interesting as the country’s political and administrative centre as well as the major port. Suva and its urban surrounds are home to half of Fiji’s urban population, and it is one of the South Pacific’s largest and most sophisticated cities, housing the University of the South Pacific, the  Fiji Museum and many interesting colonial-era buildings. It is a multicultural city with many mosques, temples, churches and cultural centres. The Roman Catholic Cathedral (1902) is one of the city’s most prominent landmarks.

 

Suva Municipal Market

Immerse yourself in the festive, friendly atmosphere of this wonderful street market, where you’ll find every tropical fruit and vegetable imaginable.

 

Parliament

Suva

330 5811

These impressive, orange-colored government buildings were modeled after traditional Fijian thatched huts, and the complex is open to visitors.

 

Municipal Handicraft Center

Suva

331 3433

Try your hand at bargaining for artifacts and handicrafts at these outdoor market stalls.

 

Colo-I-Suva Forest Park

Suva

(679) 3320211

Take a dip in one of the natural swimming pools, follow a nature trail and keep your ears and eyes ready to spot the numerous birds that inhabit this park.

 

Albert Park

Suva

This park was made famous when Charles Kingsford-Smith made an emergency landing here on his 1928 trans-Pacific flight.

 

Fiji Museum (“Na Vale Ni i Yaya Maroroi”)

Suva

679 331 5944

Open:  Mon-Thur: 9:30am – 4:00pm

Fri: 9:30am- 3.30pm

Sat & Public Holidays: 9:30am – 4:00pm; Sunday- Closed

Archaeological findings dating back 3500 years as well as cultural objects reflecting Fiji’s inhabitants during the past 100 years are housed in the oldest museum in the South Pacific.

 

Nadi

Fiji‘s third largest town is set against a mountainous backdrop on the west coast of Viti Levu. The local economy of Nadi relies almost totally on tourism.  In Nadi there are a wide range of accommodations from the simple to luxury resorts. Its Central Market offers traditional handicrafts including wood carved objects and textiles. There are a high proportion of Fiji Indians in Nadi, mostly fourth-generation descendants of the indentured laborers brought to Fiji from India during the colonial years to work in the canefields.

 

Sri Siva Subramaniya Swami Temple

Nadi

The Temple is located at the southern end of the main street. Visitors are welcome (but asked not to have consumed either alcohol or non-vegetarian food that day). There is a good market offering the usual  mix of Melanesian, Chinese and Indian produce. The main strip is filled with restaurants and shops selling clothes, souvenirs and duty-free goods. Nadi is also a good place for outdoor  activities:  everything from diving, golf, horse riding and rafting to riding in a jet-boat or light plane is available.

 

Mamanuca Group

The Mamanucas are a bunch of tiny islands just off the western coast of Viti Levu, and they are easily accessible by boat from Nadi, either as a day trip or to stay in one of the many luxury resorts or hostels. The islands are popular with divers, snorkellers, surfers and people who just want to lie about on open stretches of white-sand beach. The lovely reefs and colorful fish make snorkelling around these islands a highlight for many travelers. Only a few of the islands, such as  Monu and Monuriki, have significant areas of native forest left. These places are home to many birds and reptiles.

 

Sigatoka

Sigatoka is a small town on the southern coast of Viti Levu, 61km (38mi) south of Nadi and 127km (79mi) west of Suva on the banks of Fiji’s second-largest river. This is  principally a farming community, but is also a service town for the Coral Coast resorts.

Sigatoka is a good base for exploring the huge Sigatoka sand dunes nearby, and also the southern coast, and the Sigatoka Valley. The Sigatoka Valley is a highly fertile strip containing almost 200 cultural and archaeological sites, including the Tavuni Hill Fort, a series of defensive earth works built by the Tongan chief Maile Latemai in the 18th century. The valley is also home to some of Fiji’s best potters.

 

Kula Eco Park

Sigatoka, Fiji Islands

Ph: 679 – 6500 505

Fax: 679 6520 202

Kula is located on Queens Road, opposite the Outrigger Reef Resort east of Sigatoka town. Being Fiji’s only wildlife park, Kula is the breeding center for Fiji’s endangered species. The park provides free Environmental Hands-on Education to Fiji’s children. Visitors can spend hours observing parrots, lories, falcons, hawks, fruit bats, snakes, iguana and marine life plus learn of Fiji’s flora and fauna in near natural settings. Wander the rain forest or explore

The waterfront area is another place to shop, and the Suva Municipal Market is a must-see for visitors with its exotic fruits and vegetables, kava, fish and seafood, and spices. It has a multicultural flavor, with vendors selling brightly colored Indian sweets and candies, and fruit drinks from glass tanks.

 

Nausori Highlands

Due east from Nadi, in the interior of the Viti Levu island, are the fantastic landscapes and remote villages of the Nausori Highlands. The village of Navala is one of  the most picturesque in all Fiji. While most Fijian villages now use prefab concrete and corrugated iron, almost all of Navala’s homes and buildings are traditional bures arranged around avenues with a central promenade leading down to a river.

 

This is an isolated area.  The protocol is to ask to see the village chief, and then ask him if it is  all right to walk around the village and take some photos.  Sunday is not a good time as it is the day of worship and for spending time with the family. Bukuya village is further west and it too is a worthwhile excursion. There are simple accommodations available in the villages. 

 

Koroyanitu National Heritage Park

666 6644

Near Lautoka

Koroyanitu National Heritage Park is set in the steep hills above Nadi and is only 16 kms from Lautoka. You can explore the forests and waterfalls, picnic, take a swim in a mountain stream, go on short walks and overnight hikes or stay with the villagers and experience life in a Fijian highland community.

 

Native Crafts

Fijians still practice many traditional arts and crafts, some which have been modified and embellished to satisfy the demands of tourism. Fiji has been famous for pottery since the Lapita people began trading their wares thousands of years ago. The most famous of the contemporary potters are Dian Tugea and Taraivini Wati, both of whom are featured in the Fiji Museum. Wood carving is still important, perhaps mostly because of the steady tourist demand for souvenirs to take home. Fijian carvers make war clubs, spears and cannibal forks. Drinking bowls, or tanoas, are still in daily use in Fijian households. Carvings in areas that have a Polynesian influence (from Tongan and Samoan settlers) feature inlays of shell and bone.

 

Bark cloth, known in Fiji as masi, was traditionally made throughout the Pacific and was usually known as tapa. Ceremonial robes, waistbands, trains and turbans were once made from masi and the cloth was decorated with symbolic motifs in ochre-rusts and charcoal-blacks. The cloth is made from the bark of the mulberry tree and its production is very labourious. Traditionally, large and highly decorated masi cloths were used as ceremonial gifts and there was much prestige associated with their ownership. The weaving of pandanus leaves into mats and baskets has a long tradition, too. Most village girls still learn the craft, and there are many variations in style and colour (achieved by scraping the leaves, burying them in mud and boiling them with other plants).

E – Events & Entertainments

Fijians celebrate New Year’s Day and the festivities can last a week (or even a month!) in some villages.

 

February or March Hindu Holi (Festival of Colours) sees people squirt each other with coloured water.

 

March or April

Ram Naumi (Birth of Lord Rama) is a Hindu festival held in March or April and includes a religious festival and party on the shores of Suva Bay.

 

May

the nation honors Ratu Sir Lala Sukuna with a public holiday. He is considered Fiji’s greatest statesman, soldier, high chief and scholar, and the day is celebrated with regional cultural shows and games.

 

July

The Constitution Day holiday and Prophet Mohammed’s Birthday holiday fall in July.

 

September

The Sugar Festival is celebrated in September at Lautoka,

 

October

Fiji Day (Independence Day) falls in early October.

 

October or November Hindus celebrate the Diwali Festival (Festival of Lights). They worship Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth and prosperity, decorate their houses and settle their business affairs.

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