Category: United States

Greenville, South Carolina

A- Overview:
Greenville is located in the Piedmont region of South Carolina in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The area, commonly referred to as the Upstate, includes Greenville, Spartanburg, Anderson, Pickens and Cherokee counties and the cities of Anderson, Clemson, Greenville, Simpsonville, Greer and Spartanburg. The city represents 56,000 residents of the roughly 350,000 who make up the region. Greenville’s moderate climate offers a full change of seasons. The average annual temperature is 59 degrees F with an average rainfall of 50.45 inches and an average snowfall of 1.20 inches per year.

One of the city’s main attractions of Greenville is its award winning downtown. Falls Park on the Reedy is a must visit in downtown. This city park showcases the scenic Reedy River Falls. The feature attraction is a one-of-a-kind pedestrian suspension bridge, offering beautiful view of the Falls and surrounding park. Downtown is also the arts and entertainment epicenter for the Upstate South with live entertainment ranging from ballet and symphony to hockey and indoor football. Local theater companies provide intimate settings for performances, while the Peace Center for the Performing Arts hosts major productions on three performance stages including an outdoor amphitheater. The Bi-Lo seats 17,000 and hosts athletic events as well as major concerts and family entertainment. The Bob Jones University Museum and Gallery offers one of the most recognized collections of religious artwork in the nation, including works by such artists as Dolci, Rembrandt, Rubens, Titan and Van Dyck. The nationally recognized Greenville County Art Museum has an exquisite collection as well.

Greenville also holds the honor of being the home of Shoeless Joe Jackson. Homegrown legend Joe Jackson began his baseball career in the local textile league at the age of thirteen. He earned his nickname by playing gin one game without his shoes that were hurting his feet. After getting a hit and rounding the bases in his stocking feet, a fan of the opposing team shouted, “You shoeless son-of-a-gun!” A local sportswriter heard the remark and tagged Jackson with the nickname “Shoeless Joe”. In his honor, visitors can enjoy a visit to Shoeless Joe Jackson Memorial Park as well as visit the Shoeless Joe Jackson Plaza Statue & Fountain in the historic West End of the city.

For a little outdoor adventure as well as a beautiful experience, visitors should plan on spending time exploring some of the magnificent areas. Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area, located on the border of North and South Carolina offers a breath-taking view of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Another beautiful site is the Campbell Covered Bridge. Built in 1909, this is the only remaining covered bridge in South Carolina.

For a taste of Civil War History, the South Carolina Confederate Museum shouldn’t be missed.
It is operated & owned by the 16th Regiment, SC Volunteers, sons of Confederate Veterans, Camp 36, in memory of the 250,000 gallant Confederate soldiers who answered the call of duty. The museum features a large collection of artifacts and memorabilia from the war.

Also located in Greenville is the Palmetto Expo Center, one of the largest exposition facilities in the southeast with 368,000 square feet of exhibit space in four halls. The Palmetto Expo Center is a popular regional destination for corporate meetings, tradeshows, banquets, and many special events held throughout the year. The city is also known for its outdoor entertainment which includes Jazz Concerts, Farmer’s Markets, and Moonlight Movies along the River.

Within the City of Greenville are 39 parks, playgrounds and recreation centers which include bike/jogging trails, miniature golf course, shuffleboard courts, tennis courts, playground structures, picnic shelters and ball fields for a total of 452 acres of park space, making any day a day of fun. And, after a day of fun in the city, there is nothing better than a meal at one of the city’s many fine restaurants.

This remarkable, historic city, so conveniently located to major interstate highways truly offers its visitors year-round entertainment. No matter what the reason for a visit or the time of year, this tranquil South Carolina city has something for everyone.

B- City Information:
Population: 56,002

Elevation: 966 feet above sea level

Land Area: 26.1 square miles

Location: Greenville is located in the Piedmont region of South Carolina in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in the northwest section of the state and at the intersection of Interstate 85 and Interstate 385

Time Zone: Eastern Time Zone (when it’s noon in Greenville, it’s 11am in Chicago and 9am in Los Angeles). Greenville observes Daylight Saving Time from April – October

Weather:

Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

Average temp. (°F)
40.8
44.5
51.7
59.3
67.5
74.9
78.9
77.5
71.6
60.6
51.3
43.4

High temperature (°F)
50.6
55.3
63.2
71.5
78.7
85.5
89.1
87.4
81.5
71.8
61.9
53.0

Low temperature (°F)
31.0
33.5
40.2
47.0
56.2
64.2
68.5
67.7
61.5
49.4
40.7
33.7

Precipitation (in)
5.1
4.5
5.5
3.8
4.8
4.3
4.7
4.3
4.2
4.1
4.1
4.3

Climate:

Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

Days with precipitation
11
9
12
10
10
11
12
11
9
8
9
10

Wind speed (mph)
8.9
9.0
9.1
8.6
7.0
6.1
6.0
5.4
5.8
6.6
7.7
8.3

Morning humidity (%)
84
82
83
84
89
92
93
95
95
92
87
84

Afternoon humidity (%)
58
54
52
49
55
59
61
61
61
55
55
58

Sunshine (%)
55
59
61
67
62
63
62
57
58
62
58
55

Snowfall (in)
3.9
3.3
2.4
0.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.5
1.6

Local Seasons:

With a year round moderate climate, each season brings something special to this historic city. Summer tends to be the busiest time of year as visitors from the north come to see the sights. With the daytime temperatures in the mid to high 80’s F, it’s perfect for working on that summer tan. Fall brings a plethora of color to the area and visitors can expect watching the leaves change. Be sure to bring a camera. Winters are generally mild but it does snow occasionally, transforming the entire area into a postcard-like effect. It’s just right for a wonderful meal by a warm fire. Spring brings a rebirth to the area as blossoms appear and the temperatures rise. Whatever the reason for visiting or whatever the season, Greenville awaits its visitors with some of natures best.

How to Get There:

By Air

Greenville – Spartanburg Airport

2000 GSP Drive

Greer, SC 29651

846 877-7426

The airport is conveniently located near the city and is served by many of the nationally known airlines as well as certain local and regional carriers.

Ground Transportation

Most of the major car rental companies as well as taxi, limousine and shuttle services are available at the airport as well as throughout the city.

By Car

From the northeast and southwest, the city is located directly on Interstate 85, from the southeast, I-385 enters the city off of Interstate 26 and from the north, and Interstate 26 intersects I-85

By Train

Amtrak

1120 West Washington Street
Greenville, SC 29601

800-USA-RAIL

By Bus

Greyhound

100 W McBee Ave.

Greenville. SC 29601

864-235-4741

How to Get Around:

With so many things to see and do both in the city as well as throughout the surrounding area, the best way to get around is by either personal or rental car.

National Holidays:

New Year’s Day, Jan. 1

Martin Luther King, Jr., Day 3rd Mon. in Jan.

President’s Day, 3rd Mon. in Feb.

Memorial Day, last Mon. in May

Independence Day, July 4

Labor Day, 1st Mon. in Sept.

Thanksgiving Day, 4th Thurs. in Nov.

Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, Dec. 24 and 25

New Year’s Eve, Dec. 31

C- Attractions/Things To Do:
Beattie House

8 Bennett St.

Greenville, SC 29601

864-233-9977
Hours: Call for days and hours of operation

Admission Free by appointment

An Italian Gothic-style house, circa 1834, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Features include exquisite turnings, brackets and railings on the roof of an arched verandah. Furnished in early Victorian style and now occupied by the Greenville Woman´ s Club.

Kilgore-Lewis House
560 N. Academy St.

Greenville, SC 29601

864-232-3020

Hours: Open year-round, Monday-Friday, 10am – 2pm

Admission Free

This historic house, built between 1835-1838, now houses the Greenville Council of Garden Clubs and is surrounded by a five-acre tract planted with a series of charming gardens. On the National Register of Historic Places.

Bob Jones University Museum & Gallery
1700 Wade Hampton Blvd.

Greenville, SC 29614

864-770-1331

Hours: Open Tuesday – Sunday 2 – 5pm. Closed Thanksgiving Day, Dec. 20 – 25, Jan. 1, July 4 and BJU commencement day in early May.

Admission Charged

One of the most highly recognized collections of religious art in America includes works by Dolci, Rubens, Botticelli and Van Dyck. Children must be six years or older.

Caesar’s Head Overlook & Visitors Center
Caesar’s Head State Park

US Hwy. 276 at the SC/NC border

864-836-6115

Hours: The visitor center is open year round, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm; Saturday – Sunday, 9am – 6pm.

Call for directions and additional information

Admission Free

At 3,208 feet, the overlook provides a breath-taking view of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area

Caesars Head Station

US Hwy. 276 at the SC/NC border.

864-836-6115

Hours: The visitor center is open year-round, everyday 9am – 5pm
Admission Free

At 3,266 feet, the overlook provides a breath-taking view of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Special note: the state parks known Caesars Head and Jones Gap have been combined and reclassified as a “Natural Area” under the title “The Mountain Bridge State Natural Area.”

Campbell’s Covered Bridge

Built in 1909, this is the only remaining covered bridge in South Carolina. From U.S. Hwy. 25 north of Travelers Rest, take State Rd. 414 through Tigerville. Turn right on Pleasant Hill Road, right on Campbell´ s Bridge Road and travel approximately 1/4 mile to bridge.

Paris Mountain State Park
2401 State Park Rd.

Greenville, SC 29609

864-244-5565

Hours: Call for additional information

Admission Charged

Paris Mountain State Park located only 7 miles from downtown Greenville offers over 1500 acres of mountainous forest in an urban setting. Educational programs focusing on the pristine environment are available to school groups and the general public. Over 9 miles of trail and four lakes provide opportunities to explore nature. Special events offered by the Friends of Paris Mountain State Park throughout the year highlight environmental awareness.

Poinsett Bridge

The oldest bridge in SC, completed in 1820, is part of the original state road connecting Greenville to Asheville. From US Hwy. 25 N., two miles northwest of SC Hwy. 11, turn onto Old US Hwy. 25. Travel 3.2 miles and turn right onto Callahan Mountain Road. Travel 2.2 miles and bridge is on left.

Christ Episcopal Church
10 N. Church St.

Greenville, SC 29601

864-271-8773

Hours: Tours by appointment, call for additional information

Admission Free

A Gothic-Revival structure with an unusual brick spire, this was the first church built in Greenville. The congregation was founded in 1820 by summer residents from Charleston. Notables buried in the cemetery include town founder Vardry McBee. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Downtown Baptist Church
101 W. McBee Ave.

Greenville, SC 29601

864-235-5746

Hours: Call for additional information

Admission Free

Located in the heart of Greenville, this is a large and beautiful historic church building. The sanctuary was dedicated in 1858 as First Baptist. Downtown Baptist was formed in February 1974.

Roper Mountain Science Center
402 Roper Mountain Rd.

Greenville SC 29615

864-281-1188

Hours: Varies by venue, call for additional information

Admission Charged

The science center is open to the public the second Saturday of each month & offers different programs. It contains one of the largest planetariums in South Carolina and it is open to the public each Friday evening, 7:30, 8:30 & 9:30p.m.

Shoeless Joe Jackson Memorial Park, Statue, and Fountain

Greenville’s homegrown legend Joe Jackson began his baseball career in the local textile league at the age of thirteen. He earned his nickname by playing in one game without his shoes because they were hurting his feet. After getting a hit and rounding the bases in his stocking feet, a fan of the opposing team shouted, “You shoeless son-of-a-gun!” A local sportswriter heard the remark and tagged Jackson with the nickname “Shoeless Joe”

This park pays homage to Joe. He grew up and played ball in this Brandon Mill Community during the early 1900’s. Take Academy Street, cross Pendleton St. onto “Shoeless Joe Jackson Memorial Parkway”. Take a right onto West Street. A life-size statue is located in the historic West End of the City of Greenville; take Main Street south to Pendleton & Augusta Streets. The base was constructed with bricks removed from the Old Comiskey Ball Park where Jackson played for the Chicago White Sox before he was accused of being a part of throwing the 1919 World Series. He was later found innocent of the charges but was banned from professional baseball.

South Carolina Confederate Museum
15 Boyce Ave.

Greenville, SC 29601 (in the Pettigru Historic District, near the Bi-Lo Center)

864-268-0713

Hours: Open Wednesday, 10am – 3pm; Friday, 5 – 9pm; Saturday, 10am – 5pm; Sunday, 1 – 5pm

Admission Free

Operated & owned by the 16th Regiment, SC Volunteers, sons of Confederate Veterans, Camp 36, in memory of the 250,000 gallant Confederate soldiers who answered the call of duty. Features a large collection of artifacts and memorabilia from the war.

Falls Park on the Reedy
123 W. Broad St.

Greenville, SC 29601

864-467-4350

Hours: Call for additional information

Admission Free

This downtown park showcases the scenic Reedy River Falls. The feature attraction is a one-of-a-kind pedestrian suspension bridge, offering beautiful view of the Falls and surrounding park.

Furman University Thompson Gallery

3300 Poinsett Hwy.

Greenville, SC 29613

864-294-2074

Hours: Open weekdays 9am – 5pm

Admission Free

This gallery in Furman´ s Roe Art Building exhibits the work of top local and regional artists, and student works.

Gassaway Mansion

106 Dupont Drive

Greenville, SC 29607

864-271-0188

Hours: Open by appointment

Admission Charged

The mansion combines several complex architectural styles and represents the wealthy Greenville of the 1920s.

Symmes Chapel “Pretty Place”

Located 5 miles off US Hwy. 276 near Caesars Head State Park.

864-836-5785

Hours: Open daily, the chapel is closed to the public during weddings and camp functions. Call ahead for scheduled closings.

The outdoor chapel at the YMCA Camp Greenville is called “Pretty Place” because of the breathtaking view from Standing Stone Mountain. More than 100 couples are married each year at this chapel.

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College St.

Greenville, SC 29601

864-271-7570

Hours: Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 5pm (Thursdays until 8pm). Sundays 1 – 5pm.

Admission Free
The museum houses one of the finest collections of Andrew Wyeth´s watercolors in the world, including recent works. Also, the highly acclaimed Southern Collection features works from the 1700´s to the present.

Greenville Zoo

150 Cleveland Park Dr.

Greenville, SC 29601
864-467-4300

Hours: Open daily, 10am – 4:30pm, except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day

Admission Charged

Wildlife from around the world is displayed in natural open-air exhibits. Children under 13 must be accompanied by adult. Picnic shelters, playgrounds and tennis courts.

Cowpens National Battlefield

4001 Chesnee Hwy
Gaffney, SC 29341

864-461-2828

Hours: Open daily 9am – 5pm. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Special Events celebrated on anniversary date of battle and 4th of July.

Admission Charged

Famous for the Jan. 17, 1781 battle where Daniel Morgan led his outnumbered troops against Banastre Tarleton´s troops, Cowpens offers interpretive facilities, a visitor’s center with exhibits, a tour road and a walking trail through the battlefield.

South Carolina Botanical Garden

102 Garden Trail, Clemson University,

Clemson, SC 29634

864-656-3405

Hours: The grounds are open 365 days a year from dawn until dusk

Admission Charged

This 270-acre public garden features several thousand varieties of ornamental plants, both native and introduced; niche gardens; natural woodlands and streams; an arboretum; and the only nature-based sculpture collection of its kind in the nation. A visitor’s center, geology museum and cafe are also located here. The garden hosts numerous educational and recreational events year round, including nature walks and festivals.

Shopping:

Downtown

Greenville’s walkable Main Street, – which features beautiful trees, attractive landscaping, public art and comfortable street furniture – gracefully hosts a variety of specialty shops offering antiques, high-fashion clothing, toys, books, furniture and art galleries, along with rare and unusual gift items. Add the largest concentration of cultural amenities in South Carolina together with more than 70 restaurants and it’s a destination well worth adding to the itinerary.

West End Market & Historic District
The West End Historic District, known as the arts and entertainment center of the city, is anchored by the West End Market and Falls Park on the Reedy. While visiting the West End, you can browse through the shops in the West End Market and surrounding streets, dine in one of the area’s unique restaurants, enjoy a theater performance, or view the progress of the construction of a world-class pedestrian bridge across the Reedy River falls.

Augusta Road

Less than a mile from Greenville’s central business district, nestled between some of the most desirable neighborhoods, you’ll find the Augusta Road Shopping District. Fine clothing stores, flower shops, health food markets and decorating resource centers can be found near old fashioned hardware stores and a wide range of restaurants. Augusta Road is also the location of Greenville’s first, and still very active, shopping mall.

D- Family Fun Attractions:
A Unique Way to Explore Downtown Greenville

This was a school project idea by a local high school student who wanted to do something good for the community so that people would feel they were in a special place that has character and individuality.
Based on the popular children’s book Goodnight Moon, a bronzed sculpture of the book and one mouse are mounted on the fountain in front of the Hyatt Regency hotel and the other eight mice are installed along a nine-block stretch of Main Street between the Hyatt & the Westin Poinsett hotels. The artist who created the work is Zan Wells.

Hints to finding the mice:

1. Where the water springs above ground. Mr. Mickey is on his book. (Think fountain at a downtown hotel)

2. Mrs. Minnie is within 75 ft of Mickey, keeping vehicles off the sidewalk and keeping an eye on her old man. (Think across the street on a parking barrier)

3. Mickey Jr. is too young to drink a.m. adult beverages, but he is trying to sneak in anyway. (Think about a coffee shop)

4. With a northern view, Mickey and Minnie’s son, Mikey, watches the crowds
at Downtown Alive. (Think Piazza Bergamo)

5. At her high-tech location, Miss Minney, Mikey’s twin sister, keeps an eye on the pedestrians. From above and is the hardest to find. (Think of a large, high-tech business on Main Street)

6. Hard to see, little brother Mitch hangs out at the Rising Star. (Think artwork in front of a bank)

7. Melissa, Mitch’s twin sister, keeps watch on patrons eating Chinese and wraps. (Think Chinese restaurant and a Mexican wrap restaurant)

8. Minnie’s sister Mifflin stays on a wall at the newest high-rise by the corner of the oldest bank. (If you can hear the wind chimes on Main Street you are close)

9. Near a rain spout at an Italian restaurant, Uncle Miles, Mifflin’s husband enjoys the garden close by.

Campbell’s Covered Bridge

Built in 1909, this is the only remaining covered bridge in South Carolina. From U.S. Hwy. 25 north of Travelers Rest, take State Rd. 414 through Tigerville. Turn right on Pleasant Hill Road, right on Campbell´ s Bridge Road and travel approximately 1/4 mile to bridge.

Paris Mountain State Park
2401 State Park Rd.

Greenville, SC 29609

864-244-5565

Hours: Call for additional information

Admission Charged

Paris Mountain State Park, located only 7 miles from downtown Greenville, offers over 1500 acres of mountainous forest in an urban setting. Educational programs focusing on the pristine environment are available to school groups and the general public. Over 9 miles of trail and four lakes provide opportunities to explore nature. Special events offered by the Friends of Paris Mountain State Park throughout the year highlight environmental awareness.

Roper Mountain Science Center
402 Roper Mountain Rd.

Greenville SC 29615

864-281-1188

Hours: Varies by venue, call for additional information

Admission Charged

The science center is open to the public the second Saturday of each month & offers different programs. It contains one of the largest planetariums in South Carolina and it is open to the public each Friday evening, 7:30, 8:30 & 9:30p.m.

Shoeless Joe Jackson

Greenville’s homegrown legend Joe Jackson began his baseball career in the local textile league at the age of thirteen. He earned his nickname by playing in one game without his shoes because they were hurting his feet. After getting a hit and rounding the bases in his

Stocking feet, a fan of the opposing team shouted, “You shoeless son-of-a-gun!” A local sportswriter heard the remark and tagged Jackson with the nickname “Shoeless Joe”

Shoeless Joe Jackson Memorial Park

This park pays homage to Joe. He grew up and played ball in this Brandon Mill Community during the early 1900’s. Take Academy Street, cross Pendleton St. onto “Shoeless Joe Jackson Memorial Parkway”. Take a right onto West Street.

Shoeless Joe Jackson Plaza Statue & Fountain

This life-size statue is located in the historic West End of the City of Greenville; take Main Street south to Pendleton & Augusta Streets. The base was constructed with bricks removed from the Old Comiskey Ball Park where Jackson played for the Chicago White Sox before he was accused of being a part of throwing the 1919 World Series. He was later found innocent of the charges but was banned from professional baseball.

Jackson Grave

Woodlawn Memorial Gardens

Wade Hampton Blvd.

Jackson died in 1951; his grave is located at Woodlawn Memorial Gardens. He continues to be one of the most publicized and beloved baseball players in the history of the game.

South Carolina Confederate Museum
15 Boyce Ave.

Greenville, SC 29601 (in the Pettigru Historic District, near the Bi-Lo Center)

864-268-0713

Hours: Open Wednesday, 10am – 3pm; Friday, 5 – 9pm; Saturday, 10am – 5pm; Sunday, 1 – 5pm

Admission Free

Operated & owned by the 16th Regiment, SC Volunteers, sons of Confederate Veterans, Camp 36, in memory of the 250,000 gallant Confederate soldiers who answered the call of duty. Features a large collection of artifacts and memorabilia from the war.

Greenville Zoo

150 Cleveland Park Dr.

Greenville, SC 29601
864-467-4300

Hours: Open daily, 10am – 4:30pm, except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day

Admission Charged

Wildlife from around the world is displayed in natural open-air exhibits. Children under 13 must be accompanied by adult. Picnic shelters, playgrounds and tennis courts.

Nearby:

Hollywild Animal Park

2325 Hampton Rd.

Inman, SC 29349

864-472-2038
Hours: Open daily 9am – 6pm, April 1 – Labor Day. Open weekends only 9am – 5pm, March and Labor Day to Halloween.

Admission Charged

This 100-acre animal park features hundreds of exotic animals; “Outback Safari” rides; feeding stations; concessions and more!

Cowpens National Battlefield

4001 Chesnee Hwy
Gaffney, SC 29341

864-461-2828

Hours: Open daily 9am – 5pm. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Special Events celebrated on anniversary date of battle and 4th of July.

Admission Charged

Famous for the Jan. 17, 1781 battle where Daniel Morgan led his outnumbered troops against Banastre Tarleton´ s troops, Cowpens offers interpretive facilities, a visitor’s center with exhibits, a tour road and a walking trail through the battlefield.

E- Events & Entertainment:
Events & Entertainment

March

Annual Carolina First Reedy River Run

Held in early March

Location: Intersection of South Main & McBee Streets, Downtown Greenville

800-937-8461

Fee charged for race

The Annual Reedy River Run 10K is a Palmetto Grand Prix event and is the RRCA South Carolina 10K State Championship.

April

A Celebration of Quilting

Held in mid April

Location: Morningside Baptist Church

864-585-5435

Biannual Quilt Show, featuring dimension quilt patterns for creative people.

Artisphere: The International Arts Festival of Greenville

Held in early April

Location: Falls Park
864-271-9398

Call for additional information

Artisphere is an annual signature event for Greenville, SC, which showcases the arts, reflect the area’s international flair and maximize existing arts programs by providing a diverse menu of experiences that center around the arts…visual and performing…and Greenville’s multi-cultural offerings to appeal to visitors from throughout the world, as well as citizens throughout the region.

Run for Hope 5K

Held in early April

Location: Downtown Greenville through Cleveland Park

864-972-3354

Call for additional information

The Run for Hope is an established event that has achieved a great success in its short history. It was started in 1996 by Greenville Jaycees as a fundraiser for its primary charity, Jaycees Camp Hope, a camp for mentally challenged individuals in South Carolina.

May

Greek Festival

Held in mid May

Location: Saint George Greek Orthodox Cathedral

864-233-8531

The annual Greek Festival in Downtown Greenville is an entertaining and delicious “Taste of Greece”, offered at the Church’s location across from the old Greenville County Public Library.

June

Chautauqua Festival

Held in mid June

Location: Downtown Greenville

864-609-5812

“Civil War, as told by those who were there”

July

BMW Charity Pro-Am

Dates vary, call for exact date

Location: The Cliffs

864-297-1831

The BMW Charity Pro-Am at The Cliffs golf tournament is one of the premier events on the Nationwide PGA Tour and the only event that pairs professional golfers with amateur/celebrity partners in a two-day better-ball competition.

September

Art in the Park

Held in early September

Location: Falls Park on the reedy

864-380-8097

The centerpiece of the festival is a large outdoor gallery, covered by tents, which features the Upstate Visual Arts Annual Member Exhibition. Over 350 original art works by more than 150 artist members are showcased in this exhibition. The members’ exhibition is juried for awards. Surrounding this gallery are many individual artist booth exhibits featuring local and out-of-town artists, informational booth displays by other Greenville area visual art organizations and institutions, and a hands-on art activities area for children.

Piedmont Fall Festival
Held in late September
Location: Greenville State Farmers Market
864- 244-4023

Call for additional information

Race for the Cure

Held in late September

Location: Varies

864-298-CURE (298-2873)

Call for additional information

Location: Varies in Greenville, call for exact location

This nationally recognized event takes place throughout the country with proceeds benefiting the The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation.

October

Bark in the Park

Held in mid October

Location: Clement Estate, Greer SC

864-243-4222

A variety of doggie games, contests, prizes, raffles, demonstrations, food, vendors, kid’s activities, as well as fun and educational seminars take place at this annual event.

Fall for Greenville

Held in early October

Location: Varies throughout Greenville
864-467-5780

Call for additional information
The three-day event highlights Greenville’s finest restaurants and musical entertainment on 5 music stages including the new Wachovia Stage. Bring the kids too, the family will love the MDC Homes Children’s Area featuring amusement rides and craft activities for everyone.

Entertainment:

The Peace Center for the Performing Arts

300 South Main St.

Greenville, SC 29601

864-467-3030

Call for performance schedule and additional information

The Peace Center’s mission is to present the world’s finest performers from a broad variety of disciplines, sustain state-of-the-art theatrical venues and quality services to support local performing arts groups, and foster life-long appreciation for the arts through comprehensive education and outreach programs for children, educators and adults.

Founded with the philosophy that a strong cultural life is integral to a community’s success, The Peace Center is an advocate for the performing arts, and actively participates in the economic development and cultural advancement of the upstate.

The Warehouse Theatre
37 Augusta Street
Greenville, SC 29601
864-235-6948

Season runs September – May, call for additional information

From the classic to the contemporary, The Warehouse Theatre presents some of the best professional theatre in the Upstate. But the “Warehouse experience” doesn’t end there. The popular Staged Reading Series has become The Warehouse Theatre New Play Symposium where audiences directly participate in the development of new plays. It also produces Late Nites, presenting edgier works along with experimental and provisational theatre.

The Greenville Chorale
864-235-1101

Season runs November – May, call for additional information

The mission of the Greenville Chorale is to bring together vocal and orchestral artists to provide the region with a professional symphonic chorus for the purpose of re-creating great music to enrich the soul and enjoyment of both performer and listener. The vision of the Artistic Director and Conductor determines the balance of masterworks and new music to ensure exacting performance standards and enthusiastic involvement for all participants.

Greenville Symphony Orchestra
200 South Main Street
Greenville, SC 29601
864-232-0344

Call for performance schedule

The Greenville Symphony Association is dedicated to providing educational and cultural opportunities for the citizens of Greenville and surrounding communities through the presentation of live orchestral music. Offering excellence in live musical performances, the orchestra enriches lives, educates minds and encourages community support of the arts.

Greenville Little Theatre

444 College Street

Greenville, SC 29601

864-233-6238

Season runs September – June, call for additional information

If visitors are looking for rich, evocatively staged and costumed classical theater — drama, comedy, and musicals — in the Upstate of South Carolina, they have come to the right place. Every year, GLT stages six shows by the greats of theater, from Shakespeare to Wilde to Cole Porter.

South Carolina Children’s Theatre

Performances held at the Peace Center

864-235-2885

Season runs December – June, call for performance schedule

The mission of SCCT is to educate and stimulate the minds and imaginations of young people and their families through theatre of the highest quality, year-round education and accessible outreach.

The Bi-Lo Center

650 North Academy Street
Greenville, SC 29601
864-241-3800

Call for event, performance schedule and additional information

Sports, concerts, family shows, the Bi-Lo Center has ‘em all.

Sports:

Greenville Grrrowl

Professional Hockey

Games played at the Bi-Lo Center

650 North Academy Street
Greenville, SC 29601

864-467-4777

Season runs October – April

The Greenville Grrrowl of the ECHL are the proud affiliates of the Chicago Blackhawks and Edmonton Oilers

Beaufort, South Carolina

A- Overview:

Some 30 miles north of Hilton Head Island, Beaufort (Low Country pronunciation byoo-fort) is an old seaport with narrow streets shaded by huge moss-draped live oaks and lined with pre-Revolutionary and antebellum homes. It is located on Port Royal Island, one of the large Sea Islands along the southeast Atlantic coast.

A center of luxury homes prior to the Civil War, Beaufort was one of a few southern cities spared from fire in the war’s aftermath, making it an architectural treasure. The oldest house (at Port Republic and New Streets) was built in 1717, before the birth of George Washington. Beaufort is one of the few towns in the United States whose entire downtown has been designated by the National Trust for Historic Preservation as an historic district. Nearly 200 restored buildings can be seen in the city’s historic district.

More than 50 historic buildings have been identified and include lovely private homes beautifully restored. Start your visit to Beaufort with a walk along the peaceful harbor at Waterfront Park. The park is a pleasant place to linger for a while, and several restaurants are nearby. Boat and horse-drawn carriage tours also start from the park.

The Low country’s salt-marsh ecosystem, one of the world’s most productive and unspoiled, is remarkably easy to explore from a Beaufort base. The A.C.E. Basin is the vast wilderness created at the juncture of the Ashepoo, Combahee and Edisto Rivers. Guided boat and kayak tours allow visitors to photograph hundreds of species of birds while exploring the coast, and boat rentals enable adventurers to explore on their own. Given the abundance of water, it’s no wonder that fishing, sailing, shrimping and crabbing are popular activities for visitors. Port Royal’s boardwalk and Hunting Island State Park’s pier are among the ideal fishing venues as well as being popular for sightseeing and leisurely strolls.

A five-mile leisure trail winds through Port Royal for jogging and bicycling and includes an observation deck.

Beaufort and Port Royal are proud to host three military bases. The military is an integral part of Beaufort, with the Marine Corps Air Station to the north, Parris Island Recruit Depot on Port Royal Sound, and the Naval Hospital at the heart of the community. The Marines take an active role in community life. They assist in emergencies, entertain at air shows and volunteer at community events.

Art galleries, antique shops and modern boutiques are within the downtown walking area, not to mention fine dining and quick eateries. Museums are a beginning for an educational and interesting look at the history of the area.

The Beaufort Museum includes artifacts from throughout the city’s history, including Native American relics and Revolutionary and Civil War items. The Federal-style John Mark Verdier House was built in 1790, and St. Helena’s Episcopal Church dates to 1724. Of special interest—although it’s not open to the public—is the Milton Maxey House, traditionally claimed as the site where South Carolina’s secession documents were drafted.

Filmmakers have discovered that Beaufort locations make convincing movie settings, whether they’re looking to portray the Old South or the jungles and beaches of Vietnam. Some 20 movies have had scenes shot in the area, but Beaufort’s fondest memories are of Tom Hanks and the film Forrest Gump. For the most part, local residents take film making in stride. They’ve seen a lot of excitement in films such as The Big Chill, The Prince of Tides, Forces of Nature, Rules of Engagement, Jungle Book, White Squall, Something to Talk About, The Legend of Bagger Vance, GI Jane, The Last Dance and the TV series Gullah. Gullah Island was filmed on location in Beaufort. It seems as if almost everyone has at least one, really good, first-hand filmmaking story to share.

In the Low country, a festival or celebration is almost always underway. Locals and visitors regularly take to the streets, parks and waterways to enjoy life with the special varieties of cuisine, entertainment, crafts and activities, which define the friendly communities and their customs. Among Beaufort’s notable annual events are the yearly Plantation Tour and Tour of Historic Homes in March and the Beaufort Water Festival in late July.

B- City Information:
Population: 12,950

Elevation: 11 feet

Land Area: 18.6 square miles

Location: Beaufort is located in southeastern South Carolina along Highway 17 between Savannah, Georgia and Charleston, South Carolina.

Time Zone: Eastern Time Zone

Weather:

Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

Average temp. (°F)
48.5
50.7
57.3
64.4
72.7
78.5
81.6
80.4
76.0
67.1
58.5
50.8

High temperature (°F)
58.4
61.3
67.8
74.8
81.9
87.0
89.8
88.3
83.8
76.3
68.2
60.4

Low temperature (°F)
38.5
40.1
46.7
54.1
63.4
69.9
73.4
72.5
68.2
57.9
48.7
41.2

Precipitation (in)
4.1
3.1
3.7
3.0
3.1
5.7
5.7
7.5
5.3
3.1
2.6
3.1

Climate:

Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

Days with precip.
9
8
9
7
8
12
13
13
10
6
7
8

Wind speed (mph)
8.4
8.8
9.3
8.8
7.8
7.6
7.1
6.8
7.3
7.4
7.4
7.8

Morning humidity (%)
83
82
84
84
86
88
89
91
91
89
87
84

Afternoon humidity (%)
55
51
49
47
51
57
59
61
60
54
53
55

Sunshine (%)
54
57
63
71
68
65
65
62
59
63
61
55

Days clear of clouds
9
8
9
11
9
7
6
6
7
12
11
9

Partly cloudy days
6
6
9
9
10
11
14
14
10
8
7
7

Cloudy days
16
14
13
11
12
12
12
12
13
11
12
15

Snowfall (in)
0.1
0.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.1

Local Seasons: Beaufort winters are moderate and summers are pleasant to hot, with continuous, cooling on-shore breezes. Average annual temperature is 65ºF and annual precipitation is 49.4 inches. Temperatures in August can run into the 90s and lows in winter may reach 20 degrees. And yes, once every few winters there may be a few snowflakes, but the snow rarely sticks. When a winter front passes through, the temperatures usually bounce back to the high 60s or low 70s within a couple of days.

How to Get There

By Air

International airports are located in Charleston (Charleston International Airport) to the north of Beaufort and in Savannah (Savannah International Airport) to the south. Savannah is about a 45-minute drive, and Charleston is 65 miles away, an easy hour and a half drive. Each is about an hour to an hour and a half drive from the City of Beaufort. Major carriers offer scheduled flights from both airports. The Beaufort County Airport and Hilton Head County Airport offer private and corporate service.

By Car

It’s easy to get to beautiful Beaufort, just a short drive from I-95 or US 17 which both run north-south the length of the United States and connect to other interstates and major highways.

Driving south on US 17, exit onto US 21 at Gardens Corner and enjoy the scenic marsh views driving approximately 20 miles east into the downtown Beaufort area.

Driving south on I-95, Exit 33 at Point South and connect to US 21 for a direct route into the center of Beaufort.

Driving north on I-95, exit 8 onto US 278 toward Hilton Head Island and directly into the Bluffton area and the southern part of Beaufort County. This route connects to SC 170 to cross the river into the City of Beaufort in the northern part of the county.

By Train

Train travel via Amtrak (800-usa-rail) is convenient to Beaufort with the Yemassee station only a few miles to the west of downtown. Daily north-south service is available.

By Bus

Greyhound Buses stop at Beaufort’s Boundary Street station. Buses usually stop at Parris Island except during periods of heightened security. Greyhound telephone numbers are (843) 524-4646 for local information and (800) 231-2222 for fare and schedule information.

National Holidays:

New Year’s Day: Jan. 1

Martin Luther King, Jr., Day: 3rd Mon. in Jan.

President’s Day: 3rd Mon. in Feb.

Memorial Day: last Mon. in May

Independence Day: July 4

Labor Day: 1st Mon. in Sept.

Thanksgiving Day: 4th Thurs. in Nov.

Christmas Eve and Christmas Day: Dec. 24 and 25

New Year’s Eve: Dec. 31

C- Attractions/Things To Do:
The Spirit of Old Beaufort

West Street extension

Tours depart from just behind the John Market Verdier House Museum.

843/525-0459

Tuesday to Saturday at 10am, 11:30am, 1:15, and 3:30pm.

Admission Charged

This tour takes you on a 2 hour journey through the old town, exploring local history, architecture, horticulture, and Low Country life.

St. Helen’s Episcopal Church

501 Church St.

843/522-1722

Monday to Saturday from 10am to 4pm

Admission Free

This church traces its origin back to 1712, and visitors can see its classic interior and visit the graveyard, where tombstones served as operating tables during the Civil War.

North Street Aquarium

608 North Street

843-524-1550
Thursday-Saturday, 10am-6pm

The first public aquarium in South Carolina. Features local marine life.

John Mark Verdier House Museum
(843) 379-6335
801 Bay St.
Mon -Sat, 11am-4pm
Admission Charged

The museum is a restored 1802 house built for a wealthy merchant-planter, partially furnished to depict the life of a merchant planter during the period 1800-25. It is one of the best examples of the Federal period and was once known as the Lafayette Building, because the Marquis de Lafayette is said to have spoken here in 1825.

The Beaufort Museum
713 Craven St.

843-379-3331
Mon-Sat, 10:30 am-4 pm.
Admission Charged
The museum is housed in the 1795 Beaufort Arsenal. Exhibits tell the story of the individual crops that created plantation life and the wars which changed the character of the area along with that of the country.

Parris Island Museum

Marine Corps Recruit Depot
843-228-2951
Call for hours of operation.
Admission Free
Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year’s Day and Easter.
The Parris Island Museum in the War Memorial Building depicts the history of Parris Island since the French Huguenots landed in 1562. The museum is full of exhibits about historic Beaufort, including 127 different types of weapons, depicting all the wars the Marine Corps has been involved in. Civil War buffs and kids will enjoy the big Civil War display with its miniature battle scenes. Visitors also may thrill to the color and precision of graduation ceremonies, which are conducted almost every Friday year-round.

Penn Center
York W. Bailey Museum
St. Helena Island
843-838-2432

Monday-Saturday, 11m-4pm

Admission Charged
The site of the country’s first school for freed slaves and one of the most significant African American historical and cultural institutions in existence today.

Old Sheldon Church Ruins
U.S. 21, Beaufort

Admission Free
Remains of Prince William’s Parish Church, 1745-55. It was burned by the British during the Revolutionary War, reconstructed in 1825 and burned by Sherman’s troops in 1865.

Cole-Heyward House
Bluffton
843-757-6293

Tuesday-Friday, 10am-3pm; Saturday,11am-2pm

Admission Charged
Museum typical of the West Indies style home, partially restored and managed by the Bluffton Historical Preservation Society. Seven additional homes are in Bluffton’s national historic district.

Low country Estuarium – A Coastal Learning Center

Corner of 14th St. and Paris Ave., Port Royal

843-524-6600

Friday-Saturday, 10am-5pm, other days by appointment

Admission Charged

The Lowcountry Estuarium is a learning center designed to provide hands-on learning about the coastal environments of our beautiful area, such as salt marshes, beaches, coastal waters, and estuaries with creature feeding twice daily.

Prehistoric Gift Shop and Shark Museum
1628 Paris Ave.
Port Royal, SC 29935
843-525-1961

Call for hours.

Admission Charged.
Prehistoric museum displaying the largest collection of giant sharks teeth in the world.

Hunting Island State Park

Highway 21

843-838-2011

Admission Charged

16 miles east of Beaufort, is South Carolina’s most visited state park. It has three miles of clean, safe beach along the Atlantic Ocean, picnic tables and camp sites with an ocean view, plus an 1873 lighthouse that offers a bird’s eye view of the pristine island and coastal waters that embrace it.
Hiking trails pierce the subtropical forest of palmettos, pine and moss-draped oak and offer glimpses of the abundant bird and wildlife residents.
A pier offers a venue for fishing and crabbing and a spot to watch dolphins do their own fishing. An ambling marsh walk reveals secrets of the tidal marsh and presents an opportunity to watch millions of scurrying crabs. A large lagoon is a perfect staging area for launching kayaks. A Visitors Center and a Nature Center provide a wealth of information about the coastal ecology.

An annual South Carolina Park Passport lets you access this state park — and dozens of other parks throughout the state — for a modest annual fee.

D- Family Fun Attractions:
Beaufort Fun Park
591 Robert Smalls Parkway
Beaufort, SC 29906
843-524-2267

Tues-Thursday, noon-9pm; Fridays, noot-11pm, Saturdays, 10am-11pm; Sundays, noon-8pm

Admission Charged
Beaufort’s only entertainment center offering: Go Karts for ages 4-104, 18 challenging holes of miniature golf, 50 game arcades, jump castle, water wars, batting cages, party planning and much more. Fun for the entire family.

Hunting Island State Park

Highway 21

843-838-2011

Admission Charged

16 miles east of Beaufort, is South Carolina’s most visited state park. It has three miles of clean, safe beach along the Atlantic Ocean, picnic tables and camp sites with an ocean view, plus an 1873 lighthouse that offers a bird’s eye view of the pristine island and coastal waters that embrace it.
Hiking trails pierce the subtropical forest of palmettos, pine and moss-draped oak and offer glimpses of the abundant bird and wildlife residents.
A pier offers a venue for fishing and crabbing and a spot to watch dolphins do their own fishing. An ambling marsh walk reveals secrets of the tidal marsh and presents an opportunity to watch millions of scurrying crabs. A large lagoon is a perfect staging area for launching kayaks. A Visitors Center and a Nature Center provide a wealth of information about the coastal ecology.
An annual South Carolina Park Passport lets you access this state park — and dozens of other parks throughout the state — for a modest annual fee.

Parris Island Museum
War Memorial Building

843-228-2951

Monday-Sunday, 10am-4:30pm

Admission Charged
The Parris Island Museum in the War Memorial Building depicts the history of Parris Island since the French Huguenots landed in 1562. The museum is chock-full of exhibits about historic Beaufort – including 127 different types of weapons – depicting all the wars the Marine Corps has been involved in. Civil War buffs and kids will enjoy the big Civil War display with its miniature battle scenes. Be sure to inquire about bus tours and self-guided driving tours of the island at the visitor’s center.

The Beaufort Museum and Arsenal

713 Craven Street
Monday through Saturday,11am-4pm

Admission Charged
The Beaufort museum is a unique and funky museum, full of Indian and Civil War artifacts and Beaufort memorabilia, including a spinning wheel from the Colonial era and the desk Robert Smalls used as a congressman. Before or after your trip through the museum, children will enjoy the cannons in the museum’s courtyard. Ask for a scavenger hunt sheet for your family to use when going through the museum to make your experience interactive and educational.

Penn Center
York W. Bailey Museum
St. Helena Island
843-838-2432

Monday-Saturday, 11m-4pm

Admission Charged
The site of the country’s first school for freed slaves and one of the most significant African American historical and cultural institutions in existence today.

E- Events & Entertainment:
Events

February

Black History Month

943-986-5400
Call for information

Lectures, films and special events arranged at Penn Center.

Great Chefs of the South

843-986-5400

Call for information

This event is celebrated the last weekend in February with visiting chefs, wine and food seminars and a GALA tasting event showcasing the best of the local cuisine and wines from around the world.

March

41st Annual Spring Art Exhibit

Greene Street Art and Activities Center

Greene Street at Hamar Street

843-525-7067

Call for date/time/admission information
Spring art exhibit featuring local artwork in the fields of painting, drawing, photography, sculpture and fiber.

Chili Cook-Off

Beaufort Yacht and Sailing Club

843-521-4145

Call for date/time/ticket information

Admission Charged
Taste your way to Beaufort’s next Chili King!

Country Day Tour of Homes (Bluffton)

Bluffton

843-757-MAYE or 843-816-2737

Call for date/time/ticket information

Admission Charged
Tour 5 riverfront homes that are rarely open to the public, the Bluffton Oyster Factory (the last one operating in South Carolina) and an artist’s studio. This tour will be offered at a reduced rate to Beaufort and Jasper County residents who choose not to take the bus transportation from Savannah. An optional lunch at Pepper’s Porch will be offered out back in the pavilions (around a fire, if it’s cold): oyster stew, country ham sandwiches, dessert and iced tea or lemonade will give these visitors from around the world a taste of Bluffton’s finest.

April

Soft Shell Crab Fest

Town of Port Royal

843-986-5400

Call for date/time/location

Admission Free

Lowcountry Blues Festival

843-986-5400

Call for date/time/location

Admission Free

Features a free concert and the Navy’s Blue Angels every other year.

May

A Taste of Beaufort

843-986-5400

Call for date/time/location

Admission Free

Food, wine, art and music create a day-long event in downtown Beaufort.

Gullah Festival

843-986-5400

Call for dates/times/location

Memorial Day weekend

Admission Charged

A celebration of African American heritage with folkways and foods, enjoyable and educational for all.

July

Kites Over Beaufort

843-986-5400

Call for date/time/location

Admission Free
A celebration o f magnificent kites heralded by ocean breezes that typify the South Carolina Lowcountry and the Beaufort area. Kite flying experts fly unique, patriotic & customized flags from beach and the water. A great family event including kite-making & flying, festival dinner and kite auction, vendors, games and more!

Flying Pig Kite Festival

Beaufort

843-986-5400

Call for date and time

Admission Free

Professional kite flyers and kite-making for kids highlight the event, while food, drink, entertainment and fireworks sparkle from the sky to the sand of the public beach.

Water Festival

Beaufort

843-986-5400

Call for dates, times and location

10 days of celebration with a variety of concerts, water skiing, talent contests, air shows, at races and parades. Tournaments include golf, tennis, boating and bed races. Water lovers can also enjoy decorated boats and the traditional Blessing of the Fleet.

October

Shrimp Festival

843-986-5400
Call for date and time

Admission Free

Enjoy local recipes and tastings or buy fresh from the boat to cook your own! Shop for arts and crafts and enjoy the Blessing of the Fleet. Free evening entertainment, children’s activities and plenty of shrimp make this annual event unforgettable. The festival also includes a 5K Run/Walk, a kids’ Popcorn Shrimp Run, and a golf tournament.

Fall Festival

Summit Place

843-770-0105

Call for dates and times

Admission Free

Hayrides, pumpkin decorating contest, food (including festival favorites such as popcorn and cotton candy), raffle, bloodmobile and much more!

Fall Festival of Houses & Gardens
800-638-3525 or 843-524-3163

Call for dates/times and location

Admission Charged

Fall Festival of Houses & History is an annual October highlight of the Historic Beaufort Foundation when tours of various historic homes are offered along with accompanying entertainment.

Oktoberfest

Old Village, Port Royal

843-522-9867 or 843-470-0699

Call for dates and times

Admission Free

The festival typically includes live entertainment, traditional Oktoberfest music, food and drinks, along with fun activities and games for children of all ages. Local artists work is showcased.

Trick or Treat in Downtown Beaufort
Throughout Historic Downtown Beaufort

843-525-6644
4:30 PM

Admission Free

Wear your costume and trick or treat downtown!

November

Heritage Days

Penn Center

St. Helena Island
843-838-2432

Call for dates and times

Craft demonstrations, museum tours, gospel singing, storytelling, art exhibits and much more are an exhilarating and educational mix.

November-December

Homes for the Holidays

Dataw Island

843-522-9555

Call for dates and times

Admission Charged
Tour eight private homes, professionally decorated for the holidays by local florists and interior designers.

Light Up the Night Lighted Holiday Boat Parade

Downtown Beaufort

843-525-6644

Admission Free

Call for date and time

A Night on the Town — Beaufort’s Holiday Celebration & Open House

843-525-6644
Admission Free
Throughout Historic Downtown Beaufort

Call for date and time

Shopping, singing and holiday comraderie.

Annual Beaufort Christmas Parade

Bladen to Boundary to Carteret to Bay Streets

843-525-6644

Call for dates and time

Admission Free

Charleston /North Charleston, South Carolina

A- Overview:
Elegant and refined, Charleston mixes European charm with new world energy and excitement. The cityscape is one of beautiful buildings, winding streets and a touch of old world luxury, Charleston is the smaller, more comfortable New Orleans of the Upper South. The city was founded in 1670 and boomed as a center for rice and indigo trading. Since then, Charleston has occupied a prominent place in American history, and its beauty is recognized throughout the world.
The streets of Charleston are lined with historic houses and narrow apartment buildings with stucco walls and wrought iron balconies (make sure to visit Calhoun Mansion). There is something of a Caribbean flavor to Charleston, with its palm trees and welcoming feel. After strolling through the historic district, most visitors head to Waterfront Park. There they explore the landscaped square and boardwalks projecting into the river. White Point Gardens afford a view of the water with its gentle breezes that are cool in the heat of the day. The Charleston Museum is the oldest in the nation, dating from 1773. The market area has old-fashioned, open stalls from which vendors sell all sorts of fascinating items.

Charleston is located on the end of a small peninsula that points into the famous Charleston Harbor, from which traders and immigrants have disembarked for centuries. In the middle of the harbor sits Fort Sumter, the site of the battle that ignited the Civil War. A museum within the Fort tells the full story.

The city was home to members of many Protestant denominations whose heritage survives in the wide variety of church buildings they constructed. Many of these stately and beautifully appointed edifices were the first of their kind in America. Charleston Harbor was the point of entry over the years for persons of many cultures. Their influence has enriched the city.

There are numerous points of interest just outside Charleston. The fabulous beaches draw visitors for water sports and relaxation. Just beyond Charleston is Magnolia Plantation and Audubon Swamp Garden. The ornamental gardens are stunning in the summer when the flowers are in bloom. Visitors tour the grounds, the magnificent main house, and the out buildings, and then enjoy an ecological tour of the fascinating marshes and waterways from the comfort of a scenic tram ride.

Charleston is known for its beauty and its easygoing pace, as well as for its priceless historic treasures. Travel & Leisure, Conde Nast Traveler, and Family Fun have rated the city a Top Destination in the United States for value, #1 in friendliness, and #2 in the South for families.

Looking to experience old world charm and elegance in a friendly enjoyable atmosphere? From the Harbor to the plantation, Charleston has so much to offer travelers looking for a thoroughly enjoyable destination.

B- City Information:
Population: 96,650

Elevation: 118 feet

County: Charleston

Land area: 97.0 square miles

Time Zone: Charleston is in the Eastern Standard Time Zone. When it is 12:00 noon in New York City; it is also 12:00 noon in Charleston. Daylight saving time is observed from the end of April through the end of October.

National Holidays:

New Year’s Day Jan. 1

Martin Luther King, Jr., Day 3rd Mon. in Jan.

President’s Day 3rd Mon. in Feb.

Memorial Day last Mon. in May

Independence Day July 4

Labor Day 1st Mon. in Sept.

Thanksgiving Day 4th Thurs. in Nov.

Christmas Eve and Christmas Day Dec. 24 and 25

New Year’s Eve Dec. 31

Getting There:

By Air

Charleston International Airport is in North Charleston on I-26, about 12 miles west of the city. Taxis and the airport shuttle provide transportation from the airport. All major car-rental facilities are available at the airport. If you are driving, follow the airport-access road to I-26 into the heart of Charleston.

By Car

The main north-south coastal route, U.S. 17, passes through Charleston; I-26 runs northwest to southeast, ending in Charleston. Charleston is 120 miles southeast of Columbia via I-26 and 98 miles south of Myrtle Beach via U.S. 17.

Getting Around

By Bus: City bus fares service is available from 5:35am to 10pm (until 1am to North Charleston). Between 9:30am and 3:30pm, senior citizens and the handicapped pay less. Exact change is required. For route and schedule information, call 843/724-7420.

The Downtown Area Shuttle (DASH) is a quick and efficient way to get around the main downtown area daily. A day pass is available. For hours and routes, call 843/724-7420.

Charleston is laid out in an easy-to-follow grid pattern. The main north-south streets are King, Meeting, and East Bay streets. Tradd, Broad, Queen, and Calhoun streets cross the city from east to west. South of Broad Street, East Bay becomes East Battery.

C- Attractions/Things To Do:
Public Beaches
A renourished beach lures vacationers to Folly Beach. There are good seafood restaurants and colorful bars. All in all, Folly is a beachcomber’s delight. Directions to Folly Beach: If you cross the Ashley River Bridges and follow Folly Road to the end, you will soon come to Folly Beach, located south of Charleston.

Another popular beach is found on Isle of Palms, a barrier island on the South Carolina coast less than 20 minutes from Charleston. It is home to the world-famous Wild Dunes Resort.

Old Charleston Market
North and South Market Streets between Meeting and East Bay streets
A narrow line of low-roofed nineteenth-century sheds, packed with ‘basket ladies’ selling crafts, jewelry, spices, T-shirts and trinkets.

Charleston Museum
360 Meeting St
803-722-2996
A vast collection of city memorabilia conveniently located across from the town visitor center.The Charleston Museum Summer Family Calendar annually features everything from Submarines and Museum Magic with Harry Potter to Crazy Quilts and Crawling Crustaceans, plus much more. Extended hours begin July 5th. Every Thursday night during the summer, the exhibits remain open until 7:30 p.m. Kidstory offers younger history buffs a chance to have a more interactive museum experience.

Fort Sumter
City Marina, off Lockwood Blvd
803-722-1691
Fort Sumter is the site of the first battle that started the Civil War. A pleasant boat trip docks at this island which features a good Civil War museum inside the fort.

Magnolia Plantation & Audubon Swamp Garden
Hwy-61 (River Road), twelve miles west of Charleston
803-571-1266
Stunning ornamental gardens (best in spring and early summer) with tram rides through the swamp, complete with wildlife and lush flowers.

Splash Zone
James Island County Park
871 Riverland Drive
843-795-7275
Admission charged. Children under 2 free When the temperatures start rising, visitors of all ages will enjoy this favorite summer playground located within the James Island County Park. The park features two 200-foot tube slides, a Caribbean play structure with slides, a 500-foot lazy river, and a recreational pool.

Nathaniel Russel House
51 Meeting Street
843-723-1623
This national historic landmark is one of the most important neoclassical homes in America. Features include art and furnishings from the late 18th century and early 19th century.

Old Exchange and Provost Dungeon
122 East Bay Street
843-727-2165
Often called the “Independence Hall of South Carolina,” the Old Exchange was built in the late 1700’s. Today, this impressive building is filled with historical items of the state and region.

Gibbes Museum of Art
135 Meeting Street
843-722-2706
This museum features an outstanding collection of more than 7,000 American paintings, prints and drawings from the 18th century to the present.

Aiken-Rhett House
48 Elizabeth St.
843-723-1159.
Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10-5, Sun. 2-5.
Admission charged.
Dating from 1819, this mansion was once the headquarters of Confederate general Beauregard. Of special note are the original wallpaper, paint colors and some of its furnishings. The house, kitchen, slave quarters and work yard are maintained much as they were when the original occupants lived here.

American Military Museum
40 Pinckney St.
843-723-9620
Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10-6, Sun. 1-6.
Admission charged.
The museum has on display hundreds of uniforms and artifacts from all branches of service, dating from the Revolutionary War to the present. Its collections also include antique toy soldiers, war toys, miniatures and weaponry.

Calhoun Mansion
16 Meeting St.
843-722-8205
Hours: Feb.-Dec., Wed.-Sun. 10-4
Admission charged.
This lavish mansion is an interesting example of Victorian architecture. Built in 1876, it’s notable for ornate plasterwork, fine wood moldings and a 75-foot domed ceiling.

Charleston Place
130 Market St.
843-722-4900
The city’s only world-class hotel, this Orient Express property is flanked by a four-story complex of upscale boutiques and specialty shops. The hotel is so beautiful that visitors find it’s worth visiting as an attraction, even if they’re not staying there.

Circular Congregational Church
150 Meeting St.
843-577-6400
Hours: Call for tour schedule
Simple yet attractive, this church has a beamed, vaulted ceiling and is an splendid example of Romanesque architecture.

City Hall
80 Broad St.
843-577-6970
Hours: Weekdays 10-5
Admission: Free
The intersection of Meeting and Broad streets is known as the “Four Corners of Law”, representing the laws of nation, state, city, and church. On the northeast corner is graceful City Hall, dating from 1801. The second-floor Council Chamber has numerous interesting historical displays and portraits.

Dock Street Theatre
135 Church St.
843-720-3968
Hours: Weekdays 10-4
Admission: Free tours; call ahead for ticket prices and performance times.
Built on the site of one of the nation’s first playhouses, the building combines the reconstructed early Georgian playhouse and the preserved Old Planter’s Hotel (circa 1809). The theater, which offers fascinating backstage views, welcomes tours.

Edmondston-Alston House
21 E. Battery
843-722-7171
Hours: Tues.-Sat. 10-4:30, Sun.-Mon. 1:30-4:30
Admission charged.
Featuring spectacular views of Charleston Harbor, this imposing home was built in 1825 in late-Federal style and was transformed into a Greek Revival structure during the 1840s. It is tastefully furnished with antiques, portraits, prints, silver and fine china.

French Protestant (Huguenot) Church
110 Church St.
843-722-4385
Hours: Weekdays 10-12:30 and 2-4
Admission: Donations welcome
This church is the only one in the country still using the original French Huguenot liturgy.

Heyward-Washington House
87 Church St.
843-722-0354
Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10-5, Sun. 1-5
Admission charged.
Built in 1772, this home was the backdrop for DuBose Heyward’s book Porgy, which was the basis for the beloved folk opera “Porgy and Bess”. The neighborhood, known as Cabbage Row, is central to Charleston’s African-American history. President George Washington stayed in the house during his 1791 visit. It is filled with fine period furnishings and its restored 18th-century kitchen is the only one in Charleston open to visitors.

Joseph Manigault Mansion
350 Meeting St.
843-723-2926
Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10-5, Sun. 1-5
Admission charged.
A National Historic Landmark and an outstanding example of neoclassical architecture, this home was designed in 1803 and is noted for its carved-wood mantels and elaborate plaster work. Some furnishings are British and French but most are Charleston antiques.

Market Hall
88 Meeting St.
843-723-1541
Saturday noon-4, Sunday 1-4
Admission charged.
Built in 1841 and modeled after the Temple of Nike in Athens, this imposing landmark building includes the Confederate Museum, where the Daughters of the Confederacy preserve and display flags, uniforms, swords and other Civil War memorabilia.

Old Powder Magazine
79 Cumberland St.
843-805-6730
Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10-5, Sun. 2-5
Admission charged.
This structure was built in 1713 and used during the Revolutionary War. It is now a museum with costumes, armor, and other artifacts from 18th-century Charleston, all described during an interesting audiovisual tour.

Boone Hall Plantation
1235 Long Point Rd., off U.S. 17N
843-884-4371
Hours: Apr.-Labor Day, Mon.-Sat. 8:30-6:30, Sun. 1-5; Labor Day-Mar., Mon.-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 1-4 Admission charged. This working plantation is found at the end of one of the South’s most majestic avenues of oaks, and was the model for the grounds of Tara in “Gone With the Wind.” You can tour the first floor of the classic columned mansion, which was built in 1935 incorporating woodwork and flooring from the original house; however, the primary attraction is the grounds featuring formal azalea and camellia gardens.
With the opening of a downtown retail shop, Boone Hall on Wentworth provides the only plantation tour available from downtown Charleston. Shuttles to Boone Hall Plantation & Gardens leave daily from a convenient location: Intersection of King & Wentworth Streets.

Live Theater is also available at Boone Hall. “Exploring the Gullah Culture” and “Life in the South” are available twice a day, Monday – Saturday at no additional charge.

Local produce and Lowcountry products abound at Boone Hall Farms, a local roadside market located on Highway 17, across from Boone Hall Plantation. U-Pick fields with in-season produce are open to the public throughout the year. Late May/June – Cucumbers, Squash, Broccoli, Cabbage & Lettuce. June – Corn, Watermelon, Tomatoes, Peppers, Blackberries. Late September – Tomatoes, Broccoli, Cabbage, Collards.

Fort Moultrie
W. Middle St., Sullivan’s Island
843-883-3123
Hours: Daily 9-5
Admission: Free
At this site Colonel William Moultrie’s South Carolinians repelled a British assault in one of the first Patriot victories of the Revolutionary War. A 20-minute film tells the history of the fort.

Museum on the Common
217 Lucas St.
843-849-9000
Hours: Mon.-Sat. 11-4
Admission: Free
This small museum has an outdoor maritime museum and a Hurricane Hugo exhibit that documents the 1989 storm damage through video and photos.

Patriots Point
Foot of Cooper River Bridges
843-884-2727
Hours: Labor Day-Mar., daily 9-6:30; Apr.-Labor Day, daily 9-7:30
Admission charged.
Tours are offered on all of the vessels located here at the world’s largest naval and maritime museum. Visitors may tour the aircraft carrier Yorktown, the World War II submarine Clamagore, the destroyer Laffey, the nuclear merchant ship Savannah, and the cutter Ingham.

Palmetto Islands County Park
U.S. 17N, 1/2 mile past Snee Farm, turn left onto Long Point Rd.
843-884-0832
Hours: Apr. and Sept.-Oct., daily 9-6; May-Aug., daily 9-7; Nov.-Feb., daily 10-5; Mar., daily 10-6 Located across from Boone Hall Plantation, the park features a Big Toy playground, 2-acre pond, paved trails, an observation tower, marsh boardwalks and a “water island.”

Beachwater Park
Kiawah Island
843-762-2172
Admission charged per car (up to 8 passengers)
June-Aug., daily 10-7; May and Sept., daily 10-6; April and Oct., weekends 10-6.
This beach features 300 ft of beach frontage, seasonal lifeguard service, rest rooms, outdoor showers, a picnic area, snack bar and a 150-car parking lot.

Folly Beach County Park
Folly Island
843-588-2426
Admission charged per car (up to 8 passengers)
May-Aug., daily 9-7; Apr., Sept., Oct., 10-6; Nov.-Mar., daily 10-5
This large beach has 4,000 ft of ocean frontage and 2,000 ft of river frontage. The beach facilities include dressing areas, outdoor showers, rest rooms, and picnicking areas; beach chairs, raft, and umbrella rentals; and a 400-vehicle parking lot. Pelican Watch shelter is available year-round for group picnics and day or night oyster roasts.

D- Family Fun Attractions:
Old Charleston Market
North and South Market Streets between Meeting and East Bay streets
A narrow line of low-roofed nineteenth-century sheds, packed with ‘basket ladies’ selling crafts, jewelry, spices, T-shirts and trinkets.

Magnolia Plantation & Audubon Swamp Garden
Hwy-61 (River Road), twelve miles west of Charleston
803-571-1266
Stunning ornamental gardens (best in spring and early summer) with tram rides through the swamp, complete with alligators and lush flowers.

Splash Zone
James Island County Park
871 Riverland Drive
843-795-7275
Admission charged. Children under 2 free.
When the temperatures start rising, visitors of all ages will enjoy this favorite summer playground located within the James Island County Park. The park features two 200-foot tube slides, a Caribbean play structure with slides, a 500-foot lazy river, and a recreational pool.

Fort Sumter
City Marina, off Lockwood Blvd
803-722-1691
Fort Sumter is the site of the first battle that started the Civil War. A pleasant boat trip docks at this island which features a good Civil War museum inside the fort.

Old Exchange and Provost Dungeon
122 East Bay Street
843-727-2165
Often called the “Independence Hall of South Carolina,” the Old Exchange was built in the late 1700’s. Today, this impressive building is filled with historical items of the state and region.

American Military Museum
40 Pinckney St.
843-723-9620
Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10-6, Sun. 1-6.
Admission charged.
The museum has on display hundreds of uniforms and artifacts from all branches of service, dating from the Revolutionary War to the present. Its collections also include antique toy soldiers, war toys, miniatures and weaponry.

Market Hall
88 Meeting St.
843-723-1541
Saturday noon-4, Sunday 1-4
Admission charged.
Built in 1841 and modeled after the Temple of Nike in Athens, this imposing landmark building includes the Confederate Museum, where the Daughters of the Confederacy preserve and display flags, uniforms, swords and other Civil War memorabilia.

Old Powder Magazine
79 Cumberland St.
843-805-6730
Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10-5, Sun. 2-5
Admission charged.
This structure was built in 1713 and used during the Revolutionary War. It is now a museum with costumes, armor, and other artifacts from 18th-century Charleston, all described during an interesting audiovisual tour.

Boone Hall Plantation
1235 Long Point Rd., off U.S. 17N
843-884-4371
Hours: Apr.-Labor Day, Mon.-Sat. 8:30-6:30, Sun. 1-5; Labor Day-Mar., Mon.-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 1-4 Admission charged. This working plantation is found at the end of one of the South’s most majestic avenues of oaks, and was the model for the grounds of Tara in “Gone With the Wind.” You can tour the first floor of the classic columned mansion, which was built in 1935 incorporating woodwork and flooring from the original house; however, the primary attraction is the grounds featuring formal azalea and camellia gardens.

Fort Moultrie
W. Middle St., Sullivan’s Island
843-883-3123
Hours: Daily 9-5
Admission: Free
At this site Colonel William Moultrie’s South Carolinians repelled a British assault in one of the first Patriot victories of the Revolutionary War. A 20-minute film tells the history of the fort.

Patriots Point
Foot of Cooper River Bridges
843-884-2727
Hours: Labor Day-Mar., daily 9-6:30; Apr.-Labor Day, daily 9-7:30
Admission charged.Tours are offered on all of the vessels located here at the world’s largest naval and maritime museum. Visitors may tour the aircraft carrier Yorktown, the World War II submarine Clamagore, the destroyer Laffey, the nuclear merchant ship Savannah, and the cutter Ingham.

Palmetto Islands County Park
U.S. 17N, 1/2 mile past Snee Farm, turn left onto Long Point Rd.
843-884-0832
Hours: Apr. and Sept.-Oct., daily 9-6; May-Aug., daily 9-7; Nov.-Feb., daily 10-5; Mar., daily 10-6 Admission charged. Located across from Boone Hall Plantation, the park features a Big Toy playground, 2-acre pond, paved trails, an observation tower, marsh boardwalks and a “water island.”

Beachwater Park
Kiawah Island
843-762-2172
Admission charged per car (up to 8 passengers)
June-Aug., daily 10-7; May and Sept., daily 10-6; April and Oct., weekends 10-6.
This beach features 300 ft of beach frontage, seasonal lifeguard service, rest rooms, outdoor showers, a picnic area, snack bar and a 150-car parking lot.

Folly Beach County Park
Folly Island
843-588-2426
Admission charged per car (up to 8 passengers)
May-Aug., daily 9-7; Apr., Sept., Oct., 10-6; Nov.-Mar., daily 10-5
This large beach has 4,000 ft of ocean frontage and 2,000 ft of river frontage. The beach facilities include dressing areas, outdoor showers, rest rooms, and picnicking areas; beach chairs, raft, and umbrella rentals; and a 400-vehicle parking lot. Pelican Watch shelter is available year-round for group picnics and day or night oyster roasts.

South Carolina Aquarium
100 Aquarium Wharf
843-720-1990

The Great Hall is the impressive introduction to the South Carolina Aquarium. Two-story windows offer one of the best views in town of Charleston Harbor. A large wall map of South Carolina allows visitors to see the regions of South Carolina represented in the Aquarium. The floor is an artistic representation of the entire coast of South Carolina from the North Carolina to the Georgia border. The 15,000 gallon Carolina Seas exhibit that is the centerpiece of the Great Hall allows guests to see some of the colorful fish found around the reef habitats off the coast of South Carolina.

The SC Aquarium’s summertime detective theme allows children and adults alike to use their detective skills to uncover mysteries throughout each of the South Carolina regions represented at the Aquarium, from the mountains to the ocean. Guests have the opportunity to use clues, a scavenger map, a Dorsal Decoder, and the help of the five Something’s Fishy animal characters to learn more about the wonders of the natural world. Discover new facts while exploring with Ollie the Otter, Olivia the Octopus, Dr. Ali Gator, Carlos the Shark and Harrison the Heron. Turtles of all colors and creative whim have taken up residence around Charleston for the South Carolina Aquarium exhibit, Turtles on the Town. Fiberglass loggerhead sea turtles, transformed by South Carolina artists, are displayed at locations throughout the community. Modeled after successful community art projects such as Cows on Parade in Chicago, Turtles on the Town will raise funds and awareness for the conservation programs of the South Carolina Aquarium. Call 843-720-1990

E- Events & Entertainment:
Events

The Charleston Boat Show
Late January
Charleston Area Coliseum & Convention Center
(843) 762-3997

Lowcountry Oyster Festival
Late January
Boone Hall Plantation
(843) 577-4030

February

Lowcountry Coin Club Show
Early Februry
(843) 225-8456, (843) 200-7416, (843) 744-2072

Budwiser Lowcountry Blues Bash
Early-Mid February

Southeastern Wildlife Exposition
Mid-February
(843) 723-1748

March

French Quarter Art Walk
Early March
Downtown Charleston, SC
(843) 577-7100

Festival of Houses and Gardens
Mid-March 17- Mid-April
Downtown Charleston, SC
(843) 723-1623

The Garden Club of Charleston Annual

House and Garden Tours
Mid-late March
Downtown Charleston, SC
(843) 762-0091

South Carolina In-Water Boat Show

Late March – Early April
Brittlebank Park
(843) 579-0065

April

Flowertown Festival

Early April
Summerville, SC
(843) 871-9622

Cooper River Bridge Run
Early April
(843) 792-6611

Family Circle Cup
Mid-April
(800) 677-2293

World Grits Festival
Mid-April
St. George, SC
(843) 563-7943

Charleston’s Peak Blooming Season
March thru End of April

Blessing of the Fleet
Late April
Mt. Pleasant, SC
(843) 849-2061

French Quarter Art Walk
Early April
Downtown Charleston, SC
(843) 577-7100

May

Air Expo

Mid-May
Charleston Air Force Base
(843) 963-6341

Boone Hall Outdoor Pops Concert
Late May
Boone Hall Plantation
(843) 723-7528

Spoleto Arts Festival
Late May-mid-May 27 through Mid-June
(843) 722-2764

June

Charleston Greek Festival
Early June
Greek Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity
(843) 577-2063

Charleston Maritime Festival
Mid-June
Maritime Center Complex, Downtown Charleston
(843) 722-1030

Annual 4th of July Celebrations
July 4

Charleston: Patriots Point
(843) 884-2727

Brittlebank Park

(843) 577-3647

Summerville

(843) 821-7260

September

Moja Festival
Late September – Early October
(843) 724-7305

Annual Fall Candlelight Tour of Homes and Gardens
Mid-September 16 –Late October
The Preservation Society
(843) 722-4630

Scottish Games and Highland Gathering
Mid-September
(843) 224-7867

October

Charleston Corn Maize

Throughout October
Johns Island, SC
(843) 559-0788

A Taste of the Town
1st Weekend in October
Summerville, SC
(843) 873-2931

The Taste of Charleston
2nd weekend in October
(843) 577-4030

Touring the Tombstones
Mid-October
(843) 766-2080

Carolina Coastal Fair
Late October – Early November
Ladson, SC

November

Civil War Reenactment of the Battle of Secessionville
Boone Hall Plantation
November 20 & 21, 2004

December

5K Reindeer Walk/Run
Early December
161 East Bay Street at Cumberland St.
(843) 345-6906

Charleston Tree Lighting Ceremony

Early December
Marion Square
(800) 774-0006

Annual Charleston Parade of Boats
Early December
Charleston Harbor
(800) 774-0006

First Night – New Year’s Eve
December 31
(843) 853-6423