Tag: Hollywood California

Hollywood, California

A- Overview:
Reaching out above the town of Hollywood itself is the well known Hollywood sign high on a hill at the end of Beachwood Drive. The 50 foot high letters used to spell out ‘Hollywoodland’. The original sign was placed in 1923 as an advertisement for a proposed housing development that was never built. Finally, in 1949, the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce arranged to repair the deteriorating sign and to remove the last four letters. The site is now protected by high tech infrared cameras with radar-activated zoom lenses.

Hollywood is part of the city of Los Angeles, and is situated northwest of the downtown district. Hollywood’s southern border follows Melrose Avenue from Vermont Avenue west to La Brea Avenue. From there the boundary continues north on La Brea, wrapping west around the city of West Hollywood along Fountain Avenue before turning north again on Laurel Canyon Boulevard into the Hollywood Hills. The eastern boundary follows Vermont Avenue north from Melrose past Hollywood Boulevard to Franklin Avenue. From there the border goes west along Franklin to Western Avenue, and then north on Western into Griffith Park. Most of the hills between Laurel Canyon and Griffith Park are part of Hollywood.

Many of the old landmarks still stand. The intersection of Hollywood and Vine was supposedly the spot were many future stars were ‘discovered.’ Close by is the Capitol Records Building, which looks like a stack of 45 records on a turntable. Many big name artists of the 1950s and 1960s recorded on the Capitol label, and a large mural pays tribute to some of them. Further along Hollywood Boulevard is Hollywood’s most famous and popular attraction: Mann’s Chinese Theatre.

It was here that the tradition of immortalizing movie stars’ foot and handprints in cement began. This was supposed to have started when actress Norma Talmadge accidentally stepped on the wet concrete of the construction site. The Hollywood Walk of Fame, with the names of many show business and movie notables set in the sidewalk is close by. The Hollywood Forever Memorial Gardens provided the final resting place for many of Hollywood’s stars. The mausoleum of Rudolph Valentino and the shrine of Douglas Fairbanks Senior are often photographed.

At present, much of the movie industry has relocated in surrounding areas such as Burbank and the Westside of Los Angeles, but businesses such as editing, effects, props, post-production, and lighting remain in Hollywood.

In 1900, Hollywood had a population of 500 people. Los Angeles, with a population of 100,000, lay was seven miles east, separated from Hollywood by miles of lemon groves

Hollywood was incorporated as a municipality in 1903. Herds of cattle of more than 200 were banned from its dusty dirt streets. In 1904 it was annexed to Los Angeles and a trolley line was laid to connect the two via newly named Hollywood Boulevard.

In the early 1900s, motion picture production was dependent on outdoor light and sunshine. As improvements were made to roads, companies from New York and New Jersey started moving to California because of the reliable weather, longer days, and magnificent scenery.

The first movie studio in the Hollywood area, Nestor Studios, was founded in 1911 by Al Christie for David Horsley in an old building on the southeast corner of Sunset Boulevard and Gower Street. In the same year, another fifteen Independents settled in Hollywood. They were followed by hundreds of others.

In 1913, Cecil B. DeMille, in association with Jesse Lasky, leased a barn with studio facilities on the southeast corner of Selma and Vine Streets which is currently the location of the Hollywood Heritage Museum.

The Charlie Chaplin Studio, on the northeast corner of La Brea and De Longpre Avenues just south of Sunset Boulevard, was built in 1917.

The first Academy Awards presentation ceremony took place on May 16, 1929 during a banquet held in the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel on Hollywood Boulevard. Tickets were $10.00, and there were 250 people in attendance.

In 1927, the era of silent movies ended. From that year until the late 1940s, the Golden Age of Hollywood reigned. The 1950s saw the arrival of television years and movie studios began to produce for TV.

The Hollywood Walk of Fame was created in 1958 and the first star was placed in 1960 as a tribute to artists working in the entertainment industry.

In 1985, the Hollywood Boulevard commercial and entertainment district was officially listed in the National Register of Historic Places protecting important buildings and seeing to it that the significance of Hollywood’s past would always be a part of its future.

Within the past six years, the Hollywood extension of the Metro Red Line subway opened, running from downtown Los Angeles to the Valley, with stops on Hollywood Boulevard at Western Avenue, at Vine Street and at Highland Avenue.

The Kodak Theatre, which opened in 2001 on Hollywood Boulevard at Highland Avenue, where the historic Hollywood Hotel once stood, has become the new home of the Oscars.

Modern day Hollywood is a diverse, vital, and active community working to preserve its past. Millions of people from all over the world still make a pilgrimage to Hollywood and experience nostalgia for that bygone, magical era of moviemaking and stardom.

B- City Information:
Population: 165,800

Elevation: 300 feet

Location: Hollywood is located in southern California and is part of the city of Los Angeles

Time Zone: Hollywood is in the Pacific Time zone. Daylight saving time is observed.

When it is 12:00 noon in New York City, it is 9:00AM in Hollywood.

Average Temperatures:

Month
High
Low

January
65F
47F

February
66F
48F

March
69F
50F

April
71F
53F

May
74F
56F

June
77F
59F

July
83F
63F

August
83F
63F

September
82F
61F

October
77F
57F

November
73F
52F

December
68F
49F

When to Visit: Summers are warm and dry with low humidity and temperatures in the low 80s. Winters are pleasant with temperatures ranging from the mid 60s to the high 40s. However, winters are also rainy at times, so be prepared with an umbrella.

Holidays Observed:

New Year’s Day Jan. 1

Martin Luther King, Jr., Day 3rd Mon. in Jan.

Lincoln’s Birthday, February 12

Washington’s Birthday, 3rd Monday in February

Easter (date varies)

Memorial Day last Mon. in May

Independence Day July 4

Labor Day 1st Mon. in Sept.

Admission Day, September 9

Columbus Day, 2nd Monday in October

Thanksgiving Day 4th Thurs. in Nov.

Christmas Day Dec. 25

Road Conditions: CalTrans provides this information at (800)427-7623

Getting There

By Air:

Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)

1 World Way

Los Angeles, CA 90045

310-646-5252

The airport is located close to the city and is served by most of the major worldwide airlines as well as certain regional carriers.

Burbank Glendale Pasadena Airport (BUR)

2627 Hollywood Way

Burbank, CA 91505

818-840-8840

Burbank airport is located on the east side of the San Fernando Valley, accessible from the 5 Freeway. This small airport is the closest to Hollywood and the valleys. Carriers include Alaska, Aloha, American, America West, Southwest and United Airlines.

Long Beach Airport (LGB)

4100 Donald Douglas Drive

Long Beach, CA 90808

562-570-2678

America West, American, and Jet Blue operate from this airport

Ground Transportation:

All of the major car rental companies are located at or near all three airports. In addition, taxi and limousine service are also available as well as shuttle service to prime destinations.

By Train:

Amtrak

800 North Alameda Street

Los Angeles, CA 90012

800-USA-RAIL (800-872-7245)

Amtrak’s Sunset Limited travels the southern route from Orlando to L.A. three times a week. The Coast Starlight runs between L.A. and San Francisco daily. 800 N. Alameda St., Los Angeles.

By Bus:

Greyhound

1716 E 7TH St.

Los Angeles, CA 90021

213-629-8401

611 Maple St.

Los Angeles Maple, CA 90014

213- 627-2940

649 S Wall St.

Los Angeles Wall, CA 90014

213-627-5405

Getting Around:

In Los Angeles

While there is some public transportation available, it is best to get around in Los Angeles by car, either personal or rental car. Rental cars are readily available throughout the city.

Los Angeles is known for heavy traffic and a shortage of parking places, so be prepared time-wise for a few extra minutes of searching. Be careful about parking on the street, even in metered spaces. Notices are posted as to which spaces are reserved for those residents holding City of Los Angeles parking permits.

In Hollywood

A car is also the best means of transportation in Hollywood.

C- Attractions/Things To Do:
Hollywood Walk of Fame

Hollywood Boulevard at Vine Street,

Hollywood, California 90028

323-469-8311

Along Hollywood Boulevard runs a mile-long stretch of sidewalk, with names embossed in brass, each at the center of a pink star embedded in dark-gray terrazzo. The first eight stars were unveiled in 1960. Since then, more than 1,600 other motion picture industry stars have been immortalized. These include: Marlon Brando at 1765 Vine, Charlie Chaplin at 6751 Hollywood, W. C. Fields at 7004 Hollywood, George and Ira Gershwin at 7083 Hollywood, Clark Gable at 1608 Vine, Greta Garbo at 6901 Hollywood, Marilyn Monroe at 6774 Hollywood, Rudolph Valentino at 6164 Hollywood, and John Wayne at 1541 Vine. Recent arrivals include Drew Barrymore at 6925 Hollywood and Dr. Seuss at 6600 Hollywood.

Mann’s Chinese Theatre

6925 Hollywood Blvd.,

Hollywood, California 90028

323-464-8111

This ornate Chinese pagoda-style movie palace is a Hollywood icon. Although you have to buy a movie ticket to view the massive interior, the courtyard is open to the public. Here you’ll find cement imbedded hand and footprints. This tradition is said to have begun at the theater’s opening in 1927, with the premiere of Cecil B. DeMille’s King of Kings, when actress Norma Talmadge accidentally stepped into the wet cement. Now more than 160 celebrities have contributed, along with an imprint of Jimmy Durante’s famous nose.

Capitol Records Building

1750 Vine St.,

Hollywood, California 90028

323-462-6252

Even though this famous recording studio is not open to the public, it is viewed and admired as a reminder of the past. Its unique circular design looks like a stack of old 45rpm records. The legend of this symbol of the 1950s is that singer Nat King Cole and songwriter Johnny Mercer suggested that the record company’s headquarters be shaped to look like a stack of 45s. Architect Welton Becket claimed he just wanted to design a structure that economized space and in so doing, he created the world’s first cylindrical office building. On its south wall, L.A. artist Richard Wyatt created the mural Hollywood Jazz, 1945-1972. At the top of the tower, a blinking light spells out “Hollywood” in Morse code.

Hollywood Entertainment Museum

7021 Hollywood Blvd.,

Hollywood, California 90028

323- 465-7900

Daily 11am-6pm (Thurs-Sun 11am-6pm Labor Day through Memorial Day)

Admission charged. Free to children under 5.

On display are highlights from a nearly a century of film, TV, and radio. Visitors can pull up a stool at the complete Cheers bar (look for where the stars carved their initials in the bar during the final episode) or sit in the captain’s chair of the original set from Star Trek: The Next Generation. There is a series of interactive demonstration rooms that teach various tricks of filmmaking. Visitors can create Foley soundtracks for a movie segment, test their skills at digital editing, and try out other entertaining, educational procedures and then sign up for the studio back-lot tour to learn more about the film-making process.

Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Blvd.,

Hollywood, California 90028

323-466-3456

1:00 pm – 4:00 pm Tues. – Sun. and 1:00 PM until 30 minutes after the last show of the day

Admision charged.

The Egyptian Theatre is just down the street from Grauman’s better-known Chinese Theatre, but it remains less altered from its original design, which was based on the then-headline-news discovery of hidden treasures in Pharaohs’ tombs. There are hieroglyphic murals and enormous scarab decorations above the stage. Hollywood’s first movie premiere, Robin Hood, starring Douglas Fairbanks, was shown here in 1922, followed by the premiere of The Ten Commandments in 1923. The building recently underwent a sensitive restoration by American Cinematheque, which now screens rare, classic, and independent films.

Hollywood Sign

6342 Mulholland Highway,

Hollywood, California, 90068

These famous 50-foot-high white sheet-metal letters have come to symbolize the movie industry and the city itself. The sign was erected on Mount Lee in 1923 as an advertisement for a real estate development. The full text originally read HOLLYWOODLAND and was lined with thousands of 20-watt bulbs around the letters which were changed periodically by a full-time caretaker who lived in a small house behind the sign.

The LAND section of the sign was damaged by a landslide, and the entire sign fell into major disrepair until Hugh Hefner, Alice Cooper, Gene Autry, and Andy Williams contributed funds to the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce for its repair. Officially updated in 1978, the 450-foot-long sign is now protected by a fence and motion detectors. The best view is from the corner of Sunset Boulevard and Bronson Avenue.

Paramount Studios
860 N. Gower St. at Melrose Avenue,

Hollywood, California, 90038

323-956-1777

Call for reservations

Experience the living history of Paramount Studios. Take a guided 2-hour historical and informative look behind the scenes of the daily operations of a major motion picture and television facility.

D- Family Fun Attractions:
Capitol Records Building

1750 Vine St.,

Hollywood, California 90028

323-462-6252

Even though this famous recording studio is not open to the public, it is viewed and admired as a reminder of the past. Its unique circular design looks like a stack of old 45rpm records. The legend of this symbol of the 1950s is that singer Nat King Cole and songwriter Johnny Mercer suggested that the record company’s headquarters be shaped to look like a stack of 45s. Architect Welton Becket claimed he just wanted to design a structure that economized space and in so doing, he created the world’s first cylindrical office building. On its south wall, L.A. artist Richard Wyatt created the mural Hollywood Jazz, 1945-1972. At the top of the tower, a blinking light spells out “Hollywood” in Morse code.

Hollywood Entertainment Museum

7021 Hollywood Blvd.,

Hollywood, California 90028

323- 465-7900

Daily 11am-6pm (Thurs-Sun 11am-6pm Labor Day through Memorial Day)

Admission charged. Free to children under 5.

On display are highlights from a nearly a century of film, TV, and radio. Visitors can pull up a stool at the complete Cheers bar (look for where the stars carved their initials in the bar during the final episode) or sit in the captain’s chair of the original set from Star Trek: The Next Generation. There is a series of interactive demonstration rooms that teach various tricks of filmmaking. Visitors can create Foley soundtracks for a movie segment, test their skills at digital editing, and try out other entertaining, educational procedures and then sign up for the studio back-lot tour to learn more about the film-making process.

Paramount Studios
860 N. Gower St. at Melrose Avenue,

Hollywood, California, 90038

323-956-1777

Call for reservations

Experience the living history of Paramount Studios. Take a guided 2-hour historical and informative look behind the scenes of the daily operations of a major motion picture and television facility.

E- Events & Entertainment:
Annual Events

Early March

Academy Awards (The Oscars)

The Kodak Theatre

at the Hollywood & Highland center

6801 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, CA.

(310) 247-3000 (the Academy) or (323) 308-6383 (the Kodak)

The most important celebrity event in Show Biz takes place each year in early March. The stars make their way up the red carpet amid flashing cameras and interview requests. It is a great opportunity to see (and take photos of) your favorite superstars, because just about everyone who is anyone in Hollywood comes to the Academy Awards show.

Late December

Hollywood Christmas Parade

Downtown Hollywood

The Hollywood Christmas Parade is rich in history. The Holiday Season begins with a star-studded extravaganza with nearly 100 celebrities offering holiday greetings to the people of Southern California and the world. The first parade such parade, in 1928, consisted of only one actress, Jeanette Loff, and Santa Claus. Today spectators line the streets of Hollywood to see the beautiful stars, classic cars, horses and riders, bands, floats, and, of course, Santa Claus.