Tag: New York New York

New York, New York

A- Overview:
No other city has such a diversity of people and cultures as New York City. Within the boundaries of its five boroughs lies a microcosm of the whole world. Visitors can move along the bustling sidewalks of Chinatown, visit the Greek tavernas of Astoria, the Old World Russian restaurants and clubs of Brighton Beach, the Italian communities of Little Italy and Arthur Avenue, the sari shops of Little India in Jackson Heights, and so much more. This city of contrasts also contains the SoHo section, with its stylish art galleries, boutiques, and bistros housed in historic cast iron buildings among cobblestone streets.
With 18,000 restaurants,150 world-class museums; more than 10,000 stores, numerous talented musicians, actors, and dancers; hundreds of family friendly activities; a profusion of parks and gardens, and an exciting nightlife, New York is at the top of the charts in every area!

Its incredible architecture includes the Empire State and Chrysler buildings. There are the thrilling performances at Lincoln Center, Carnegie Hall, the Metropolitan Opera, Broadway and off Broadway theaters. Overall, the City provides unlimited cultural and esthetic possibilities.

A double-decker bus tour of Manhattan is a good way to get a quick orientation. The bus line tours allow visitors to get off the bus at areas of interest and reboard a later bus to continue their exploration.

New York is home to the World Series champions, the New York Yankees, and from April to October you can cheer with and for them at Yankee Stadium. New York has many other great sports teams such as the Knicks, Mets, Giants, Jets, Rangers, MetroStars, and New York Liberty.

Horseracing is a spectator sport that can be viewed outdoors or comfortably from the clubhouse. Follow the Thoroughbreds at Belmont Park for most of the summer, and repeat the experience in the winter at Aqueduct Racetrack.

The Statue of Liberty can be visited and climbed or simply viewed from the water on a tour boat cruise or from the Staten Island ferry (which is free). Seeing the city skyline from the water is unforgettable! Ellis Island Immigration Museum, near the Statue of Liberty, conveys the experiences of our forebears as they came to the end of their perilous journey and embraced the promise of a better life in the New World.

Among the 150 museums in New York City is one of the world’s greatest: the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the largest museum in the Western Hemisphere displaying more than 100,000 works from artists such as Picasso, Monet, Matisse, and Warhol Nearby is Times Square, the brightest symbol of New York’s revitalization. It is possible to devote a whole day to the visual arts in just one trip to Museum Mile on Fifth Avenue, between 70th and 105th Streets, with its many cultural treasure troves.

New York City has many attractions that both entertain and educate children. In planning how to get from place to place, remember that children love to ride on subway trains. However, getting on and off the train also involves a flight or two of stairs to and from the underground. It is wise to consider overall travel time and energy when planning the day. Be sure to allow for leisurely movement from place to place, and for rest stops in between. Consider the weather too. The adage “getting there is half the fun” is a good one to remember in order to keep the day enjoyable, while avoiding exhaustion and frayed tempers. Make a list of the must -see places, and then cut it in half for best results. One trip to New York is never enough. Each one can be a pleasant memory if the pace is right…

There are 15 miles of beaches within the city limits, 13 golf courses, and four zoos. There are botanical gardens in each of the five boroughs, including the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx. The boroughs also have wonderful parks such as Prospect Park in Brooklyn and Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens.

New York is on the north-south flyway for migrating birds, and in the Spring and Fall they are present in colorful abundance. Bird watching is popular in Central Park and at the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge in Queens.

First time visitors to New York can’t possibly see and do everything, but they can get a wonderful introduction to the sights, visit famous attractions, and make notes for a return trip. In fact, there is no such thing as a last visit to New York. There are always plans being made for “the next time we’re here …”

Manhattan is 12 miles long and 3 miles wide. Its streets run east and west and its avenues run north and south. The east side covers everything east of Fifth Avenue; the West side everything to the west. Most of New York’s best known tourist attractions are concentrated in Manhattan.

Brooklyn was a separate city until 1898. It has its own civic centers, cultural institutions, shopping district and residential neighborhoods. Its major attractions include: Brooklyn Botanical Gardens, The Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Aquarium for Wildlife Conservation and Coney Island.

Queens is a largely residential borough and one of the most ethnically diverse areas of the city. Neighborhoods include Greek Astoria, Latino Jackson Heights, Asian Flushing. Flushing Meadow-Corona Park and Shea Stadium are major attractions.

The Bronx is the only borough connected to the mainland. It contains some of the city’s largest parks, including: the Bronx Zoo, New York Botanical Garden, VanCortlandt Park, Pelham Bay Park and a place called Yankee Stadium.

Staten Island (also known as Richmond) is the most rural of the boroughs. Its major visitor attractions are historic Richmond town, The Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art, Staten Island Botanical Garden, the Alice Austen House Museum, and the Staten Island ferry.

B- City Information:
Population:

Metropolitan area: 8,643,437

City Center population: 7,420,166

Visitors: 33 million annually

Elevation: 131 Feet

Area: New York City ( Manhattan, Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, Richmond) 301 square miles

Area of Manhattan: 22.7 square miles

Languages:

English, but in many areas of the City languages other than English predominate

Time Zone: Eastern Time (GMT -4 hours) Daylight saving time is observed from April-October.

Average Temperatures:

Month
High
Low

January
37F
24F

February
38F
24F

March
45F
30F

April
57F
42F

May
68F
53F

June
77F
60F

July
82F
66F

August
80F
66F

September
79F
60F

October
69F
49F

November
51F
37F

December
41F
29F

Telephone Area Code:

Manhattan: 212 Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, & Staten Island: 718

Emergency:

Ambulance/Fire/Police 911

Tips and Taxes:

Tips 15%, sales tax 7%

National Holidays:

Jan 1 New Year’s Day

3rd Monday in January Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Feb 22 Presidents’ Day

March or April Good Friday

March or April Easter

May 30 Memorial Day

July 4 Independence Day

1st Monday in September. Labor Day

Oct 12 Columbus Day

Nov 11 Veterans Day

November 25 Thanksgiving Day

Dec 25 Christmas Day

How to get around:

Driving: The best advice is don’t drive in New York City. Traffic is often gridlocked. The public transportation system is excellent.

Taxis:

New York City Taxi & Limousine Commission: 212/676-1000.

Ferry:

Staten Island Ferry. (Free) Travels Manhattan and Staten Island. Each way takes 25 minutes.

Airports:

Three Airports service New York City:

John F. Kennedy Int’l (JFK), LaGuardia (LGA), Newark Int’l. (EWR)

Subway:

The easiest way to get around Manhattan is by subway. Subways and City buses run 24 hours a day. Trains 1,2,3,9, A and C go up and down Manhattan’s west side. The 1, 9 and C are locals and stop at all stations. The 2,3 and A trains are express and stop only at major stations. Trains 4,5, and 6 head up and down the east side. The 6 is local; the 4 and 5 are express.

Trains F,N and R travel between the east and west sides of Midtown and Downtown. The E train follows almost the same route. The Subway is accessed with a Metro card. Purchase these at subway stations and at many hotels and shops. The fare includes free transfers to city buses within 2 hours. Weekly passes are more economical.

The one day Fun Pass is sold at hotels and shops and in machines at certain subway stations.

Bus:

Buses are slower than subways, but are helpful for traveling cross town. Cross town buses operate between the East and West sides on Houston, 14th, 23rd, 42nd, 57th, 66th, 72nd, 86th and 96th streets.

Buses head north up 1st, 3rd, Madison, 6th and 8th Avenues.

Buses head south down Broadway and 2nd, Lexington, 5th, 7th, and 9th Avenues.

Railway:

Pennsylvania Station is located between 31st and 33rd Streets on 7th Avenue. (212) 630-6400. Amtrak, Long Island Railroad, and New Jersey Transit trains stop at Penn Station. Connect there with the subway or taxis.

Grand Central Terminal (212) 532-4900 on the East side. Commuter trains from Connecticut and suburban New York City arrive and depart there.

Intercity Bus:

Port Authority Bus Terminal is located on 8th Avenue between 40th and 42nd Streets. Local buses from New Jersey and intercity buses from the United States and Canada serve the entire city.

Cruise Terminal in Redhook, Brooklyn

In April, 2006, the 23-story luxury ocean liner Queen Mary 2 was the first to berth just around the corner from the Beard Pier at the new, $52 million Brooklyn Cruise Terminal, inaugurating the neighborhood as New York’s latest cruise port. Dozens of ships, including the Queen Elizabeth 2 and four Princess Cruise ships, are regularly scheduled to dock there with others to follow. As a result, the entire area will undergo a metamorphosis over the coming months and years.

C- Attractions/Things To Do:
Empire State Building
350 Fifth Ave.
Midtown West, NY
(212) 736-3100
The tallest building in New York City, was completed in 1931 during the great depression, and stood almost empty for some time. Today, it’s host to millions of visitors a year, most of whom ride to the fenced-in Observation Deck just a short distance from the building’s top. The popular New York Skyride is launched from the mezzanine with Star Trek’s Scottie (James Doohan) as the guide. The Skyride simulates a rooftop flight over the city.

Staten Island Ferry
Whitehall and South Sts.
Lower Manhattan
The city’s most celebrated means of transportation offers unsurpassed views of the Manhattan skyline, and it’s free.

The Statue of Liberty
The trip to Liberty Island where Lady Liberty stands takes 15 minutes.

The Museum of Modern Art

11 West 53rd Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues

Manhattan

212-708-9400

Following a temporary move to Queens and a total renovation of the Manhattan facility, the foremost collection of modern art in the world is now completely reinstalled for the latest series of exhibitions. The MoMA draws on both its iconic masterpieces and newly installed contemporary works to explore the birth and growth of modernism.

The 100,000 pieces of art include household objects, photography, graphic design, conceptual art, and industrial design, primarily from the late 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. Works of art feature postimpressionists through “Graffiti” artists. See the early groundbreaking work of Picasso, Matisse, Cézanne, Monet, van Gogh and many other pivotal artists.

Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Ave (At 82d St.)
New York NY (212) 535-7710
Tues.-Thur. and Sun, 9:30am-5:15pm; Fri-Sat, 9:30am-9pm
Admission charged.
“The Met” has been described as a vast city of art. The limestone beaux-arts facade with its impressive steps opens onto whole buildings within. Among these are the Temple of Dendur, the Astor Court, a replica Ming dynasty scholar’s courtyard, an American wing containing over 20 period style rooms and courtyards, as well as the entire facade of the United States Bank from Wall Street. In addition, there are about 15 discrete collections from ancient art upward through the ages. An Orientation Theater points the way. On Friday and Saturday evenings, a string quartet entertains

Whitney Museum of American Art
945 Madison Ave (At 75th St.)
New York NY
(212) 570-3600
Tues, Wed, Fri-Sun, 11am-6pm; Thurs. 1-8pm
Admission charged.
The museum has an excellent permanent collection of 20th-century art. Recent acquisitions can be seen in several new galleries which opened in April 1998.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Ave. (Between 88th and 89th Sts.)
New York NY
(212) 423-3500
Fri-Sat, 10am-8pm; Sun-Wed, 10am-6pm
Admission charged.
While many art museums strive to make an architectural statement, few have succeeded as well as the Guggenheim Museum. This is the only building in New York City that was designed by the great Frank Lloyd Wright. The Guggenheim’s initial focus was on abstract painting. The museum’s scope has since expanded with acquisitions such as an excellent collection of art from the late-19th and early-20th centuries and a contemporary art center, the Guggenheim Museum SoHo, on lower Broadway. A spectacular new Guggenheim Museum, designed by Frank Gehry, is being planned for Piers 9,11,13, and 14 on the East River in Lower Manhattan.

Jewish Museum
Upper East Side 1109 5th Ave (At 92d St.)
New York NY
(212) 423-3200
Sun-Mon, Wed-Thur, 11am-5:45pm; Tues, 11am-8pm
Admission charged.
Located on Museum Mile, the Jewish Museum is dedicated to showing work that addresses issues related to Jewish identity and art by Jewish artists.

American Museum of Natural History
79th St. and Central Park West
New York NY
(212) 769-5100
Admission charged.
The Museum’s exhibition halls house a stunning array of artifacts and specimens from all corners of the world and all historical periods. These illuminate the natural history of our planet and its myriad species, and bring the world’s cultures to life. A major ($45 million) renovation has restored and enhanced each building and exhibit. Highlights are the Hayden Planetarium (Rose Center) which now features a thrill ride through the universe; partially interactive gigantic dinosaurs; a 94 foot blue whale in the two story Hall of Ocean Life; the Hall of Meteorites, Minerals, and Gems; and Nature Max theater featuring a four story high screen and Friday night jazz and tapas. There is far too much of significance than can be seen in one day!

Brooklyn Bridge
Directions: To get to the bridge, take the 4,5 or 6 subway to the Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall Station, the N or R subway to City Hall or the 2 or 3 subway to Park Place.
Admission Free
A monument to man’s ingenuity and creativity, the world’s first steel suspension bridge was designed by architect John Roebling between 1867 and 1883, with oversight of the massive project started by his son after Roebling’s sudden death, and completed by the son’s wife following his untimely death. On the Manhattan side, you can get some great views of this majestic bridge from the top of Pier 17 at the South Street Seaport. From Brooklyn, Pier 1 at the Fulton Ferry landing provides a beautiful sunset view of the bridge and downtown Manhattan.

Broadway
Phone: (212) 239-6200 or (800) 432-7250 / group # (212) 239-6262
TicketMaster: (212) 307-4100 / group # (212) 889-4300
Going to the theater is one of the most popular events for visitors to New York City. Tickets should be purchased in advance of any show. While many Broadway shows are presented with adult audiences in mind, there are dozens of shows that teens and even younger children can enjoy and appreciate.

Apollo Theater
253 W. 125th St.
Harlem, NY
(212) 749-5838
Many well-known performers got their start at the theater’s lively amateur nights, which still take place every Wednesday night.

D- Family Fun Attractions:
Bronx Zoo
Fordham Road
The Bronx
(718) 367-1010 Daily 10-5: April-Oct. Rest of the year: 10-4:30
The biggest zoo in the US has 4,000 animals, a children’s zoo , and a monorail. Newest addition: a $43 million Congo Gorilla Forest.

Brooklyn Children’s Museum
145 Brooklyn Avenue
Crown Heights, Brooklyn
(718) 735-4400 Wed.-Fri. 2-5; Sat., Sun. 10-5
The world’s first museum for children was founded in 1899. There is much to do and enjoy in this museum, including New York City highlights in miniature and the Totally Tots toddler playroom.

Children’s Museum of the Arts
182 Lafayette Street
NY, NY
(212)272-0986 Thurs.-Sun. noon-5; Wed. noon-7
Highlights include the Monet Ballpond, Architects Alley, and the Wonder Theater.

Children’s Museum of Manhattan
21 W. 83rd Street
NY, NY
(212) 721-1223 June-Aug.: Wed.-Sun. 10-5; Rest of the year: Wed.,Thurs. 1:30-5:30 and Fri.-Sun. 10-5.
Highlights include a chance for children to write and produce their own TV show.

Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Ave (At 82d St.)
New York NY (212) 535-7710
Tues.-Thur. and Sun, 9:30am-5:15pm; Fri-Sat, 9:30am-9pm
Admission charged.
“The Met” has been described as a vast city of art. The limestone beaux-arts facade with its impressive steps opens onto whole buildings within. Among these are the Teple of Dendur, the Astor Court, a replica Ming dynasty scholar’s courtyard, an American wing containing over 20 period style rooms and courtyards, as well as the entire facade of the United States Bank from Wall Street. In addition, there are about 15 discrete collections from ancient art upward through the ages. An Orientation Theater points the way. On Friday and Saturday evenings, a string quartet entertains

American Museum of Natural History
79th St. and Central Park West
New York NY
(212) 769-5100
Admission charged.
The Museum’s exhibition halls house a stunning array of artifacts and specimens from all corners of the world and all historical periods. These illuminate the natural history of our planet and its myriad species, and bring the world’s cultures to life. A major ($45 million) renovation has restored and enhanced each building and exhibit. Highlights are the Hayden Planetarium (Rose Center) which now features a thrill ride through the universe; partially interactive gigantic dinosaurs; a 94 foot blue whale in the two story Hall of Ocean Life; the Hall of Meteorites, Minerals, and Gems; and Nature Max theater featuring a four story high screen and Friday night jazz and tapas. There is far too much of significance than can be seen in one day!

Brooklyn Bridge
Directions: To get to the bridge, take the 4,5 or 6 subway to the Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall Station, the N or R subway to City Hall or the 2 or 3 subway to Park Place.
Admission Free
A monument to man’s ingenuity and creativity, the world’s first steel suspension bridge was designed by architect John Roebling between 1867 and 1883, with oversight of the massive project started by his son after Roebling’s sudden death, and completed by the son’s wife following his untimely death. On the Manhattan side, you can get some great views of this majestic bridge from the top of Pier 17 at the South Street Seaport. From Brooklyn, Pier 1 at the Fulton Ferry landing provides a beautiful sunset view of the bridge and downtown Manhattan.

Broadway
Phone: (212) 239-6200 or (800) 432-7250 / group # (212) 239-6262
TicketMaster: (212) 307-4100 / group # (212) 889-4300
Going to the theater is one of the most popular events for visitors to New York City. Tickets should be purchased in advance of any show. While many Broadway shows are presented with adult audiences in mind, there are dozens of shows that teens and even younger children can enjoy and appreciate.

Empire State Building
350 Fifth Ave.
Midtown West, NY
(212) 736-3100
The tallest building in New York City, was completed in 1931 during the great depression, and stood almost empty for some time. Today, it’s host to millions of visitors a year, most of whom ride to the fenced-in Observation Deck just a short distance from the building’s top. The popular New York Skyride is launched from the mezzanine with Star Trek’s Scottie (James Doohan) as the guide. The Skyride simulates a rooftop flight over the city.

Staten Island Ferry
Whitehall and South Sts.
Lower Manhattan
The city’s most celebrated means of transportation offers unsurpassed views of the Manhattan skyline, and it’s free.

The Statue of Liberty
The trip to Liberty Island where Lady Liberty stands takes 15 minutes. Round trip fare and admission charged. Ferries operate 7 days a week. Ferry information: 212-269-5755.

E- Events & Entertainment:
January
Chinese New Year – traditional Lunar New Year celebration from New York City’s Chinatown annually. The date varies from mid January to mid February.

February
Black History month is celebrated throughout the city with exhibits, concerts, films and lectures
Westminster Kennel Club Dog show in mid February at Madison Square Garden
National Antiques Show at Madison Square Garden

March
International Cat Show
St. Patrick’s Day Parade – one of the city’s most exuberant annual celebrations
Greek Independence Day (March 25)
New York Flower Show (end of the month)
Ringling Brothers Barnum and Bailey Circus at Madison Square Garden
New Directors; New Films at the Museum of Modern Art

April
Easter Parade on Fifth Avenue
Cherry Blossom Festival

May
Ukranian Festival in the East Village
Ninth Avenue Food Festival
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Parade – honors Dr. King and the civil rights movement
Norwegian Day Parade
India Festival
Czechoslovak Festival
Salute to Israel Parade
Washington Square Outdoor Art Festival

June
Metropolitan Opera and New York Philharmonic summer series
SummerStage series at the bandstand in Central Park
Lincoln Center Out of Doors performing Arts Festival
Shakespeare in the Park Festival at the Delacorte Theater
Museum Mile Festival
Mermaid Parade
Festival of St. Anthony
Rose Day Weekend at the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx
Puerto Rican Day Parade
JVC Jazz Festival
Lesbian and Gay Pride Day Parade on Fifth Avenue

July
4th of July fireworks over the Hudson or the East River
Mostly Mozart Festival at Lincoln Center
Serious Fun Festival at Lincoln Center to celebrate the avant garde performing arts
Summergarden Concerts featuring Julliard School musicians
African Street Festival
Feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel
Feast of the Gigolo in Brooklyn. A huge tower is carried on a platform by 250 men as they dance through the streets
O-Bon Festival at Riverside Park

August
Harlem Week features films, food, fashion shows, concerts, and sports competitions
Ecudorian Festival in Flushing. Queens
India Day Parade
US Open Tennis Tournment

September
West Indian American Day Carnival
Wigstock in Tompkins Square Park
Brazillian Carnival
Feast of San Gennaro
Washington Square Outdoor Art Exhibit
New York is Book Cøuntry
Von Steuben Day Parade on Fifth Avenue
African American Day Parade in Harlem featuring hundreds of bands
Korean Harvest and Folklore Festival

October
Pulaski Parade
Hispanic Day Parade
Blessing of the Animals
Columbus Day Parade
Greenwich Village Halloween Parade

November
Veterans’ Day Parade
Native American Film and Video Festival. It features 100 works by more than 60 filmmakers
Chocolate Show The ultimate event for chocoholics
Thanksgiving Day Parade
Begins at Central Park West at 77th St., then down Broadway to Macy’s, Herald Square (34th St.), finishing at Seventh Ave. (212) 494-4495

December
Tree lighting ceremony
Lighting of the Hanukkah menorah
Kwanzaa Holiday expo
Radio City Christmas Spectacular.at Radio City Music Hall
Christmas in New York City Displays: Special decorations are displayed at various places, including Rockefeller Center and in major department store windows
New Year’s Eve in New York City – Times Square
New Year’s Eve dropping of the Big Apple ball from the top of Times Tower
New Year’s Eve First Night New York – family-oriented visual and performing arts celebration