Tag: Singapore Travel Guide

Singapore Travel Guide – Deals

Quick Links:

A – Overview

B – City information

C – Attractions & Things To Do

D – Family Fun Attractions

E – Events & Entertainments

F – Singapore Travel Deals

Overview

 
 Though physically small, Singapore is an economic giant. It has been Southeast Asia’s most modern city for over a century. The city blends Malay, Chinese, Arab, Indian and English cultures and religions. Its unique ethnic tapestry affords visitors a wide array of sightseeing and culinary opportunities from which to choose. A full calendar of traditional festivals and holidays celebrated throughout the year adds to its cultural appeal. In addition, Singapore offers luxury hotels, delectable cuisine and great shopping! 

singapore green complex

The island nation of the Republic of Singapore lies one degree north of the Equator in Southern Asia. The country includes the island of Singapore and 58 or so smaller islands. Because of its efficient and determined government, Singapore has become a flourishing country that excels in trade and tourism and is a model to developing nations. The capital city, also called Singapore, covers about a third of the area of the main island. 

Located at the tip of the Malay Peninsula, Singapore’s tropical climate welcomes both leisure and business travelers year round. The island republic’s excellent infrastructure enables visitors to enjoy its many sites and attractions in a safe, clean and green environment. Award winning Changi Airport provides airlinks to major cities around the world. The train and subway systems are clean, fast and efficient. In addition, its state-of-the-art cruise terminal has established Singapore as one of the premier cruising centers of South East Asia and an exciting port of call on any Asian cruise itinerary.

In the city, there is no need for a car. Public transportation is excellent and walking is a good way to explore the city . All major attractions are also accessible by tour bus. Since the city is only 60 miles (100k) from the equator, the tropical temperatures do not vary much. Rainfall is fairly evenly distributed through the year. No matter when you choose to visit, warm weather will be abundantly available. The visitor is struck immediately by Singapore’s abundance of parks, nature reserves, and lush, tropical greenery.

Singapore’s progress over the past three decades has been remarkable, yet the island has not been overwhelmed by development. Visitors will discover a wealth of historical treasures from the past, in the beauty of older buildings, values and traditions that have survived in the face of profound social and geographical change.

Lacking any noteworthy natural resources, Singapore’s early prosperity was based on a vigorous free trade policy, put in place in 1819 when Sir Stamford Raffles first established it as a British trading post. Later, mass industrialization bolstered the economy, and today the state boasts the world’s second busiest port after Rotterdam, minimal unemployment, and a super efficient infrastructure. Almost the entire population lives in upscale new apartments, and the average per capita income is over US$12,000. Singapore is a clean, safe place to visit, its amenities are second to none and its public places are smoke-free and hygienic.

Forming the core of downtown Singapore is the Colonial District. Each surrounding enclave has its own distinct flavor, from the aromatic spice stores of Little India, to the tumbledown backstreets of Chinatown, where it is still possible to find calligraphers and fortune tellers, or the Arab Quarter, whose cluttered stores sell fine cloths and silks.

North of the city, are two nature preserves, Bukit Timah and the Central Catchment Area, along with the splendid Singapore Zoological Gardens. The east coast features good seafood restaurants set on long stretches of sandy beach. In addition there are over fifty islands and islets within Singaporean waters, all of which can be reached with varying degrees of ease. Day trips are popular to Sentosa, the island amusement arcade which is linked to the south coast by a short causeway and cable car. Music, theater, nightlife: all are abundant in this remarkable city. Singapore used to be considered a “stop over” on the way to larger Asian cities. This is no longer true! Visitors seek out Singapore for business and finance and also for a fascinating and satisfying vacation for the whole family.

  

B – City information

Population:
2,700,000

Area:
238.6 square miles (618.1sq. km)

Time Zone:
Greenwich Mean Time plus eight hours; Time in Singapore is 12 hours ahead of Eastern Standard Time in New York. (13 hours ahead of central time in Chicago, etc.)

International Dialing Code:
International Access Code: 106 for Malaysia (before the country code), 104 for other countries in the area. Country Code 65 City Codes not required.

Emergency Numbers:
Ambulance: 995
Fire: 995
Police: 999

Passports:
Valid passport or internationally recognized travel document and an onward/return ticket are required of all visitors.

Visas:
Visas are not required for most nationals of non-communist countries for social visits of under 14 days. Visitors arriving as tourists are given a 14-day social visit pass on arrival. As regulations may change from time to time, international visitors are encouraged to check with the nearest Singapore overseas mission before departure.

Currency:
The currency unit is the Singapore dollar (S$). Coins are in denominations of: 1, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 cents. Notes are in denominations of: $1, $5, $10, $20, $50, $100, $500, $1,000 and $10,000. Brunei notes are interchangeable with Singapore notes and are quite common. The best exchange rate can be obtained at banks, or at bank ATM machines through credit cards. Just as in the US, it is best to use an ATM outside or inside a bank (in case the ATM card should be retained for any reason by the machine).

Tipping:
Tipping is not usual in Singapore. The staff at large international hotels may, however, expect tips.

Bargaining:
It is wise to become acquainted with prices so that you can bargain effectively at small shops that do not have fixed prices. Some merchants add only a small mark up over their cost; others add on a greater percentage

Customs Regulations:
Contact Head, Terminal Section Airports Branch Customs & Excise Department, Singapore Changi Airport Changi Airport P.O. Box 5 Singapore 9181 Tel: 5459122 or 5427058 for information Or The Customs Officer Singapore Changi Airport Tel: 5412572 or your nearest Singapore Overseas Mission.

Average Temperatures:

    F  
    High Low
Jan. – March   88 73
April – June   90 75
July – Sept.   88 73
Oct. – Dec.   88 73

The climate in Singapore is tropical, with an average daytime temperature around 80ºF. Evening temperatures are only slightly lower. Rainstorms occur on about 40% of all days in Singapore. Rainstorms are usually short and intense, and because of the tropical air temperatures, the rain is warm.

Useful measurements:
1 cm 0.39 inches 1 meter 3.28 feet / 1.09 yards
1 km 0.62 miles
1 liter 0.26 gallons
1 inch 2.54 cm
1 foot 0.39 meters
1 yard 0.91 meters
1 mile 1.60 km
1 gallon 3.78 liters

National Holidays:
January 1 – New Year’s Day 
Two days: Jan. or Feb. – Lunar(Chinese) New Year 
January (date varies each year) – Hari Raya Puasa 
March (date varies) – Hari Raya Haji
April (date varies according to date of (Easter – Good Friday)
April or May Wesak Day
May 1 – Labor Day 
August 9 – National Day
November (date varies) – Deepavali 
December 25 – Christmas Day

Electricity:
Singapore has 230 voltage:
To use a 110/120 volt appliance (U.S. appliance) where there is only 220/240 power available, you must use a step down or combination converter. Your appliance’s wattage and circuitry will dictate the converter you need to purchase. 
Dual Voltage Appliances are recommended. They are designed to work with both 110/120 or 220/240 volt electricity and tend to work better than using a converter with an existing appliance.

Modem/Phone Adapter Plugs for Singapore:
Singapore has the following telephone jack(s): RJ11, TUK Non-RJ11 jacks require an outlet adapter for use with the U.S. RJ11 phone plug. Phone adapter plugs can be used in reverse to adapt the Singapore phone plug to the RJ11 outlet.

Visitors with disabilities:
Please contact:
Handicaps Welfare Association, 
16 Whampoa Drive, (behind Block 102),
Singapore 327725. 
Tel : (65) 254 3006

How to get around:

Cars:
a car is not necessary in Singapore as there is an excellent public transportation system. If you decide on using a car, rentals can be obtained from any of the international firms, or from local car hire firms. You will need both a national and international license. The law requires driving on the left side of the road and wearing a seat belt. Parking is expensive in the city.

Taxis:
Taxis can be hailed from the street or, for an additional cost, called on the telephone. Taxi drivers are not given tips.

Trains:
Singapore’s Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) system is a new, clean and easy way to travel. The train consists of two main lines that run north-south and east-west. Coin-operated ticket-dispensing machines are located inside the main doors at each station. Money-changing machines for changing paper money to coins are located opposite the ticket machines. Enter the platform through the gates marked with green arrows. There the ticket is inserted, arrow first (and facing up). The machine will open the gate and return the ticket. The same procedure is followed at the destination, except that the ticket will not be returned.

Buses:
There are two types of buses in Singapore: the Singapore Bus Service and the Trans-Island Bus Service. You can purchase a Singapore Explorer ticket that will allow you to travel anywhere for up to three days. The ticket comes with a useful map with details on major tourist destinations and whcih service to use to get there. For more information. pick up the “See Singapore by Bus” pamphlet from the STPB (Singapore Tourist Promotion Board) in Raffles City.

Ships and Ferries:
Ferry and water taxi services depart from Cliff Pier, Jardine Steps and the World Trade Centre for travel to Singapore’s outlying islands.

Bukit-Panjang LRT (SLRT):
This automated elevated people mover line started operation on 6 Nov 1999 and connects the MRT station at Choa-Chu-Kang with the new town of Bukit Panjang. Service is provided on a double track loop line every 6 minutes (2-4 minutes during rush hours) from 5:00 to 1:00. The lines are operated by SMRT (Subway operator).

Apart from station names shown in English, stations are also numbered. Between City Hall (C2) and Raffles Place (C1) there are four tracks, both stations allow comfortable transfer between lines on the same platform, City Hall in direction north/east and Raffles Place south/west. Trains operate 5:30am – 12:30am

Airport:
Changi Airport in Singapore is 10 miles (6km) from the city center and is accessible by shuttle, bus and taxi.
Its two terminals, connected by the Skytrain monorail, are modern, efficient and air-conditioned. The airport boasts a 24-hr post office and telephone service, hotel reservations counters, day rooms, saunas, and business and internet centres. There’s also a McDonald’s, a Swenson’s ice cream parlour and, in Terminal One’s basement, a food court. 
However, there isn’t usually enough time to take advantage of these many amenities. Baggage comes through so quickly at Changi that you can be on a bus or in a taxi within fifteen minutes of arrival. Be sure to pick up one of the free maps and weekly “What’s On” guides that the Singapore Tourist Promotion Board (STPB) leaves at the airport.

Bus departure points in the basements of both terminals are well marked, but make sure you have got the right change before you leave the concourse, as Singapore bus drivers don’t give change Take the #16 bus(every 10min, 6am-midnight). 
If you arrive in the early evening, you could also take advantage of the faster #16e (every 12min, 5-8pm: 
A private company, Airbus, runs a shuttle into town (every 20min, 7am-midnight). Its air-conditioned buses traveling straight into the city centre before circuiting each of the three hotel enclaves
Taxis from the airport levy a surcharge on top of the fare. Again, pick-up points are well marked: a trip into downtown Singapore takes twenty minutes There are also car rental agencies at the airport, though you’d be advised not to travel around Singapore by car.

 

C – Attractions & Things To Do

 

singapore attractions

City Hall 
St. Andrew’s Road near the Padang
This is where Lord Louis Mountbatten accepted the Japanese surrender in 1945, and where Lee Kuan Yew declared Singapore’s independence from Britain in 1959.

CN West Leisure Park
9 Japanese Garden Road
Tel 261-4771 
Water slides, bumper boats and other amusement attractions.

Guiness World of Records
World Trade Center
Facts and feats displayed in exhibits.

Haw Par Villa Dragon World
262 Pasir Panjang Road
Tel 774-0300 
9am-6pm daily
MRT to Buina Vista station and bus 200 to Haw Par Villa
A Chinese mythological theme park featuring age-old silent statues, exhilarating rides, live performances and theatre shows. A roller coaster ride is very popular, but the main attractions are the telling and reenacting of the myths and the famous statues.

Jurong Bird Park
Jurong Hill
Jurong Town
Tel 265-0022 
9am-6pm Mon-Fri. 8am-6pm weekends.
MRT to Boon Lay station and special loop bus 194 to No.251

This park features more than 5,000 birds from all over the world in a lush parkland setting.

Jurong Crocodile Paradise
Jalan Ahmad Ibrahim 
Jurong Town 
9am-6pm daily
Same transport as to Jurong Bird Park
A crocodile farm featuring underwater viewing areas and crocodile wrestling shows daily.

 

Tang Dynasty City
Yuan Ching Road and Jalan Ahmad Ibrihim
MRT to the Lakeside station and then bus 154 or 240
9:30am-6:30pm
Admission charged
This multimillion dollar theme park is a recreation of the Tang Dynasty capital which was the center of China’s golden age from the 6th to 8th centuries. Behind the high walls the main street features a courthouse, geisha house, shops, temples, restaurants and theaters. Camel rides, craft demonstrations, antique displays are all part of the experience. The park has shops selling refreshments, antiques, a wax museum of Chinese notables, kung fu demonstrations and other street performances.

Kusu Island
Kusu is located 7 km (4.5 miles) south of Singapore
Take the ferry from the World Trade Center.
A small island that, according to legend, was a turtle and transformed itself into land to save drowning sailors.

Little India
Serangoon Road
An area full of stores, restaurants and antique dealers specializing in Indian goods

Sentosa Island
Ferries running from World Trade Center in daily 7:30am – 10pm
A former military base, this island is now devoted to entertaining its guests. Within the island are museums, gardens, a butterfly park, swimming lagoons, golf courses, a large roller skating rink and various rides.

Underwater World at
Sentosa Island
Tel 275-0030 
Asia’s largest tropical oceanarium.

Botanic Gardens
Intersection of Holland Road and Napier Street World-famous tropical gardens where you can enjoy lush greenery and a beautiful orchid garden..

Chinese Garden and Japanese Garden
Yuan Ching Road
MRT to Chinese Garden station
Jurong 
Mon-Sat. 9am-7pm Sunday 8:30am-7pm
Over 35 acres (14 hectares) of beautiful scenery. Stone gardens, bonsai display, goldfish ponds, stone lanterns and small pagodas. Very colorful, pavilions, bridge, beautiful setting.

Mandai Orchid Gardens
Mandai Lake Road
A lush tropical orchid garden created in an area usually not particularly suited to orchid plants.

Chinaman Scholars Gallery
14B Trengannu St. 
Chinatown 
Tel 222-9554 
Daily 9am-4pm
Admission charged
this living museum is designed to look like a Cantonese home of the 1930’s. It includes authentic clothing, furnishings, artifacts, photographs and musical instruments.

National Museum
Stamford Road 
Tel 337-7355 
This museum has extensive collections focusing on regional history, cultures and crafts. Exhibits include archaeological finds from the Asian region, articles relating to Chinese settlement and trade, Malaysian and Indonesian arts and crafts. It also has superb examples of jade including the 380 piece Haw Par jade collection.

New Ming Village and Pewter Museum
49A Duxton Road 
Tel 221-4436
MRT to Clementi Road and then bus 78 to Pandan Road
Free admission.
8:30am-5:30pm
Examples of both old and modern works are on display here. Reproductions of porcelain from the Ming and Qing dynasties are crafted here. Watch craftsmen at work. there is also a small pewter museum.

Chettiar Hindu Temple
Tank and River Valley Roads. 
Open daily 8-noon and 5:30-8:30. 
This structure housing the image of Lord Subramaniam is a recent (1984) replacement of the original, built in the 19th century. The 21-meter-high gopuram (pyramidal gateway tower), with its colorful sculptures of godly manifestations, is astounding. The chandelier-lit interior is lavishly decorated; 48 painted-glass panels are inset in the ceiling and angled to reflect the sunrise and sunset.

Raffles Hotel
1 Beach Rd., Colonial Singapore
(dress standards apply)
Admission charged.
In 1896, the Armenian Sarkies brothers took over a “tiffin house,” or tearoom, and greatly expanded it, transforming it into one of the grandest hotels in Asia. Though rarely under British management, the hotel was long viewed as a bastion of colonialism. The hotel is no longer open for tours, but visitors can stroll around the lobby, and can visit the museum of Raffles memorabilia on the third floor; attend the multimedia show on the hotel’s history at the Jubilee Hall playhouse (show times are at 10,11,12:30 and 1. ) It is also possible to take refreshment in a reproduction of the Long Bar, where the famous Singapore sling was created in 1903 by the bartender Ngiam Tong Boon High tea is served daily in the Tiffin Room.

St. Andrew’s Cathedral
Coleman St. and St. Andrew’s St., Colonial Singapore.
The first church on this site was built in 1834; struck twice by lightning, it was demolished in 1855. Indian convicts were brought in to construct a new cathedral in 12th-century English Gothic style. Completed in 1862, the structure includes bells cast by the same firm that made Big Ben.

Cathedral Of the Good Shepherd
Queen Street
A solid neoclassical building constructed from 1843-1846, this is the Catholic Cathedral.

Sakya Muni Buddha Gaya Temple
Race Course Rd., Little India. 
This is popularly known as the Temple of 1,000 Lights because, for a small donation, you can pull a switch that lights countless bulbs around a 15-meter (50-ft) Buddha. The entire temple, as well as the Buddha statue, was built by the Thai monk Vutthisasala, who also procured relics for the temple: a mother-of-pearl-inlaid cast of the Buddha’s footprint and a piece of bark from the bodhi tree under which he received Enlightenment.

Sri Mariamman Temple
South Bridge Rd. and Temple St., Chinatown
In the center of Chinatown, this is the oldest Hindu temple in Singapore. Its pagoda-like entrance is topped by one of the most ornate gopurams (pyramidal gateway towers) you are ever likely to see. Hundreds of brightly colored statues of deities and mythical animals line the tiers of this towering porch; glazed cement cows sit, seemingly in great contentment, atop the surrounding walls.

Sultan Mosque
North Bridge Rd., Arab District.
5am-8:30pm
Built in 1928 by the same architects who designed the Victoria Memorial Hall, the Sultan Mosque is a dramatic building with golden domes and minarets that glisten in the sunlight. The walls of the vast prayer hall are adorned with green and gold mosaic tiles on which passages from the Qur’an are written in decorative Arab script. It is the largest mosque in Singapore.

Thian Hock Keng Temple (Temple of Heavenly Happiness)
Telok Ayer St., Chinatown 
Completed in 1841, this Chinese temple is one of Singapore’s oldest and largest. Thian Hock Keng is richly decorated with gilded carvings, sculptures, tiled roofs, and fine carved stone pillars. Outside, on either side of the entrance, are two stone lions: the female holding a cup, symbolizing fertility, and the male holding a ball, a symbol of wealth. Inside, a statue of a maternal Ma Chu P’oh, surrounded by masses of burning incense and candles, dominates the room. While the main temple is Taoist, the temple at the back is Buddhist and dedicated to Kuan Yin, the goddess of mercy.

Armenian Church
Armenian St., Colonial Singapore. 
Officially the Church of St. Gregory the Illuminator and the oldest surviving church in the republic, this church was built in 1835 but is no longer used for services. The Armenians are another minority group who came to Singapore in search of fortune; a dozen wealthy families supplied the funds for George Coleman, Irish architect of many early Singapore buildings, to design this church.

Botanic Gardens
Corner of Napier and Cluny Rds.
tel. 471-9955 or 471-9937 (Ranger’s office)
Admission free
Open weekdays 5 am-12 midnight. These beautifully maintained 127 year old gardens cover some 74 acres, with a large lake, masses of shrubs and flowers, and examples of many species of trees, including 30-meter-high fan palms. An extensive orchid bed boasts 250 varieties, some of them very rare.

Sunday Bird Singing
Tiong and Seng Poh Roads, next to the Havelock Road Hotel
MRT to Tiong Bahru station and walk east 500 meters
or bus 123 from Orchard Road
Sunday mornings 8-11
Songbird owners bring their caged birds to the gathering and hang the cages on wires strung between the trees. Birds are grouped according to the timbre of their voices. Owners and visitors then gather at tables, sip coffee, and listen to the concert!

Changi Prison
Upper Changi Rd., East Coast,
543-0893
Chapel and museum open Mon.-Sat. 10 am-5 pm (Closed Sunday). 
Built in 1927 by the British, and used by the Japanese in World War II to inter some 70,000 prisoners of war; today it is still a prison. A few organized tours can take you into a part of the prison on weekdays and possibly through the old British barracks areas to the former RAF camp at Changi. The walls of the Changi Prison Chapel hold poignant memorial plaques to the regiments and individuals imprisoned here during the war. Next door is the Chapel Prison Museum, with drawings, sketches, and photographs by the POWs depicting their wartime experiences. One of their murals is especially poignant, conveying a spirit of hope in the midst of despair.

Empress Place
1 Empress Pl., Colonial Singapore
Tel. 336-7633
Admission charged.
Open daily 9:30-9:30.
Constructed in the 1860s as the new courthouse, this huge Victorian building has had four major additions and housed nearly every government body. Now, after a S$22 million renovation, Empress Place is a cultural exhibition center. Most of the major exhibits are art collections from China.

Kuan Yin Temple
Waterloo St., Arab District
This is one of the most popular Chinese temples in Singapore, as evidenced by the incense-filled interior, its altars heaped with hundreds of small icons. According to legend, Kuan Yin was about to enter nirvana when she heard a plaintive cry from Earth. Touched with compassion, she gave up her place in Paradise to devote herself to alleviating the pain of those on Earth.

Arab Street
This is the Muslim center of Singapore. Attractions include the gold-domed Sultan Mosque and a variety of shops.

Chinatown
South Bridge and New Bridge area A maze of streets with shops that sell almost everything.

Little India
The area most representative of Singapore’s past. It remains largely untouched by renovation and modernization.

Singapore River
The heart of the city lined with one of Singapore’s most successful redevelopment projects. Boat Quay and Clark Quay. Boat Quay is Singapore’s premier nightspot. Clarke Quay is a family oriented area of restaurants and shops.

Bukit Timah Nature Reserve
An expanse of rainforest outside the city.

Orchard Road
A dazzling strip of luxury hotels, shopping centers, restaurants and nightspots, this is Singapore’s main tourist area.

Singapore Art Museum
Stamford Rd., Colonial Singapore
tel. 332-3222
Admission charged.
Open Tues.-Sun. 9-5:30P\
M. Housed in a grand colonial building topped by a giant silver dome. Included in its collection are 20 dioramas depicting the republic’s past; the Revere Bell, donated to the original St. Andrew’s Church in 1843 by the daughter of American patriot Paul Revere. Exhibits rotate among Singapore’s museums
 

D – Family Fun Attractions

Sentosa Island
Tel 275-0030
Ferries running from World Trade Center in daily 7:30am – 10pm A former military base, this island is now devoted to entertaining its guests. Within the island are museums, gardens, a butterfly park, swimming lagoons, gold courses, a large roller skating rink and various rides.

singapore sentosa

Underwater World
at Sentosa Island
9am-9pm daily
Admission charged
. Asia’s largest tropical oceanarium. Displays include the turtle pool, moray eel enclosure, reef enclosures with live coral, and a touch pool where visitors can reach in and touch the sealife.

Haw Par Villa Dragon World
262 Pasir Panjang Road
Tel 774-0300 
9am-6pm daily
MRT to Buina Vista station and bus 200 to Haw Par Villa
A Chinese mythological theme park featuring age-old silent statues, exhilarating rides, live performances and theatre shows. A roller coaster ride is very popular, but the main attractions are the telling and reenacting of the myths and the famous statues.

Jurong Bird Park
Jurong Hill
Jurong Town
Tel 265-0022 
9am-6pm dMon-Fri. 8am-6pm weekends.
MRT to Boon Lay station and special loop bus 194 to No.251
This park features more than 5,000 birds from all over the world in a lush parkland setting.

Jurong Crocodile Paradise
Jalan Ahmad Ibrahim 
Jurong Town 
9am-6pm daily
Same transport as to Jurong Bird Park
A crocodile farm featuring underwater viewing areas and crocodile wrestling shows daily.

Tang Dynasty City
Yuan Ching Road and Jalan Ahmad Ibrihim
MRT to the Lakeside station and then bus 154 or 240
9:30am-6:30pm
Admission charged
This multimillion dollar theme park is a recreation of the Tang Dynasty capital which was the center of China’s golden age from the 6th to 8th centuries. Behind the high walls the main street features a courthouse, geisha house, shops, temples, restaurants and theaters. Camel rides, craft demonstrations, antique displays are all part of the experience. The park has shops selling refreshments, antiques, a wax museum of Chinese notables, kungfu and other street performances.

The Science Centre
Science Center Road
MRT to the Jurong east station and bus 66 or 335
10am-6pm Tues.-Sun.
Admission charged.
Countless opportunities for interaction with exhibits are provided as a means of encouraging a love of science in children. The theater next to the center features IMAX style films coveing topics such as space flight and journeys inside the atom. there is also a planetarium.

Singapore Zoological Gardens
80 Mandai Lake Rd.
Take MRT to Ang Mo Kio station
tel. 269-3411.
Admission: S$9 adults, S$4 children under 16.
Open daily 8:30-6. 
Animals live in natural-habitat settings, there are no fences, only moats, giving the impression that the animals are vacationing at a resort! In numerous mini parks reproducing different environments giraffes, Celebese apes, bearded pigs, tigers, lions, and 160 other species enjoy the freedom and security of the park. There is, at an additional charge, a breakfast program at 9am and high tea at 4pm where visitors are joined by one of the orangutans. Elephant rides and performances are also on the schedule.

Night Safari
Open nightly from 7:30pm – midnight, in a forested area next to the zoo, this experience offers an opportunity for a guided tour viewing the nocturnal animals and their habitats. There is a charge for admission and for the tram that takes visitors on the tour.

E – Events & Entertainments

 

January

Mid-Late January:  Huayi:  Chinese Festival of Arts. This 12-day festival welcomes the Chinese New Year with outdoor cultural events and carnivals, including an 88-member lion dance and electronic, rock, punk and pop concerts by Chinese bands. Esplanade Theatres on the Bay, 1 Esplanade Drive. For information and tickets, call 6348-5555. Continues through early February 

Mid-Late January:  Thaipusam. In this dramatic Hindu festival, penitents with kavadis (semicircular steel frames) pierced to their bodies with spikes, hooks and skewers lead a procession from Sri Srinivasa Perumal Temple to Sri Thandayuthapani Temple. 

Late January:  Chingay Parade of Dreams. Floats, marching bands, more than 4,000 performers, and lion and dragon dances in one of the grandest, multicultural street parades to celebrate the Chinese New Year. The route follows Orchard Road. For information, call 6736-6622.  Continues through mid February 

Late January:  Singapore River Hong Bao. The Marina Promenade is home to this carnival by the river. Festivities include an elaborate fireworks show, Chinese arts and crafts, food, carnival rides and live entertainment. For information, call 6736-6622. Continues through early February

 

February


Early-Mid February:  Chingay Parade of Dreams. Floats, marching bands, more than 4,000 performers, and lion and dragon dances in one of the grandest, multicultural street parades to celebrate the Chinese New Year. The route follows Orchard Road. For information, call 6736-6622. Concludes mid February 
< Early February:  Huayi:  Chinese Festival of Arts. This 12-day festival welcomes the Chinese New Year with outdoor cultural events and carnivals, including an 88-member lion dance and electronic, rock, punk and pop concerts by Chinese bands. Esplanade Theatres on the Bay, 1 Esplanade Drive. For information and tickets, call 6348-5555.  

Early February:  Singapore River Hong Bao. The Marina Promenade is home to this carnival by the river. Festivities include an elaborate fireworks show, Chinese arts and crafts, food, carnival rides and live entertainment. For information, call 6736-6622.  Concludes early February

 

March

Early-Late March:  Birthday of Lao Zi Celebrations. Taoists celebrate the birthday of the philosopher and author of the Tao Te Ching with prayers, rituals and musical performances. Sago Lane and Chinatown Complex. For information, call 841-3691. 

Early-Late March:  Singapore International Festival For Children. Internationally acclaimed companies from around the world perform a repertoire of music, puppetry, drama, storytelling and plays for young audiences. Various venues. For information, call 6735-9986. For tickets, call 6348-5555.

Mid-Late March:  Singapore International Comedy Festival. Top comedians, troupes and cabaret acts from around the world perform at venues including Jubilee Hall and Raffles Hotel. For information, call 6250-3347. For tickets, call 348-5555. Continues through early April 

Mid-Late March:  Golf. One of the richest golf tournaments in Asia brings world-class golfers to compete for US$900,000. Laguna National Golf and Country Club. For information, call 6720-1540. For tickets, call 6348-5555.

 

April


Early-Mid April:  ARTSingapore, The Contemporary Asian Art Fair. More than 40 art galleries from Asia and throughout the Pacific exhibit contemporary paintings, sculptures, ceramics and other works by established artists and new talent. Suntec Singapore. For information, call 6235-4113.


Early-Mid April:  Qing Ming Festival. Chinese equivalent of All Souls Day celebrations. Food and incense are offered to ancestors at cemeteries and temples, and families go to grave sites to clean them and pray. A good place to observe these ceremonies is Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Temple on Sin Ming Road. 

Mid-Late April:  World Gourmet Summit. Asia’s leading gastronomical event features two weeks of dinners, master classes, shows and other events served up by master chefs, winemakers and international guest cooks. Various venues. For information and booking, call 6270-1254. 

Mid-Late April:  Singapore International Film Festival. Screenings of approximately 330 feature-length films, documentaries and shorts from more than 45 countries. Venues include Golden Village Grand Cinemas and the Alliance Francaise Auditorium. For information, call 6738-7578. For tickets, call 6296-2929. 

May


Mid May:  Horse Races. One of the world’s richest horse races, the Singapore International Airelines Cup takes place at the Turf Club, Kranji Course. For information, call 6879-1350. 

Mid-Late May:  Vesak Day. Public holiday. Lord Buddha’s entry into Nirvana is commemorated with chants by monks and the release of captive birds at temples. Good places to watch the ceremonies include Buddhist Lodge on River Valley Road; Thai Buddhist Temple, Jalan Buakit Merah; and Lian Shan Shuang Lin Temple, Jalan Toa Payoh. Continues through early June 

Throughout May:  Concert. The Singapore Chinese Orchestra performs frequent concerts of traditional Chinese music. Singapore Conference Hall, 7 Shenton Way. For information, call 6440-3839. For tickets, call 6348-5555.Concludes late May 

Late May:  Great Singapore Sale. An annual six-week shopping frenzy during which major stores and some designer boutiques cut prices by as much as 70% on clothing, electronics, jewelry and other items. For information, call 6223-6221 or 1900-777-7777.

 

June


Early June:  Vesak Day. Public holiday. Lord Buddha’s entry into Nirvana is commemorated with chants by monks and the release of captive birds at temples. Good places to watch the ceremonies include Buddhist Lodge on River Valley Road; Thai Buddhist Temple, Jalan Buakit Merah; and Lian Shan Shuang Lin Temple, Jalan Toa Payoh.

Mid June:  Dragon Boat Festival. In Marina Bay, boldly decorated dragon boats race to the sound of gongs and drums in this ancient Chinese watersport. The races and other festivities attract thousands. For information, call the Singapore Dragon Boat Association at 440-9763.
 

July


Late July:  Concert. The Singapore Chinese Orchestra performs frequent concerts of traditional Chinese music. Singapore Conference Hall, 7 Shenton Way. For information, call 6440-3839. For tickets, call 6348-5555. Continues through late May 2006

Throughout July:  Concert. The Singapore Symphony Orchestra performs frequently at the Esplanade Concert Hall, 01 Esplanade Drive. For information, call 6338-1230. For tickets, call 6348-5555.  Continues through late December 

Throughout July:  Great Singapore Sale. An annual six-week shopping frenzy during which major stores and some designer boutiques cut prices by as much as 70% on clothing, electronics, jewelry and other items. For information, call 6223-6221 or 1900-777-7777.  Concludes late July

 

August


Early August:   Billed as the largest gay and lesbian pride celebration in Asia, this annual event features three nights of parties, theatrical performances and art exhibits. Musical Fountain Garden, Sentosa, and other venues. 

9 August:  National Day. Public holiday. Military demonstrations, a parachute freefall, a parade and a fireworks display take place at National Stadium, 15 Stadium Road. 

Mid-August:  Hungry Ghost Festival. Spirits, some of them testy and vengeful, wander the earth and require appeasement by sumptuous banquets, street operas, candles and the burning of currency. Continues through 13 Sep 

Late August:  WOMAD. This annual international festival showcases world music, arts and dance groups performing throughout downtown Fort Canning Park. For information, call 734-5910. 

Throughout August:  Concert. The Singapore Chinese Orchestra performs frequent concerts of traditional Chinese music. Singapore Conference Hall, 7 Shenton Way. For information, call 6440-3839. For tickets, call 6348-5555. Continues through late May.

Throughout August:  Concert. The Singapore Symphony Orchestra performs frequently at the Esplanade Concert Hall, 01 Esplanade Drive. For information, call 6338-1230. For tickets, call 6348-5555. Continues through late December 

Throughout August:  Art ExhibitJu Ming Exhibition. The internationally acclaimed Taiwanese sculptor presents a collection of 70 new, never-before-seen sculptures. Fullerton Singapore Hotel, 1 Fullerton. Phone 6339-0678.

 

September


Early-Late September:  SeptFest. Singapore’s first contemporary arts center hosts cutting-edge theater and dance performances by international companies, art exhibits, concerts and other activities. The Substation, 45 Armenian St. For information, call 337-7535. Continues through early October 

Early SeptemberHungry Ghost Festival. Spirits, some of them testy and vengeful, wander the earth and require appeasement by sumptuous banquets, street operas, candles and the burning of currency. ]

Late September:  Mid-Autumn Festival. Chinese celebration of the mid-autumn harvest. Revelers feast on mooncakes, tropical fruits and other sweets sold at food stalls throughout Chinatown, which is decorated with numerous lanterns. 

Throughout September:  Concert. The Singapore Chinese Orchestra performs frequent concerts of traditional Chinese music. Singapore Conference Hall, 7 Shenton Way. For information, call 6440-3839. For tickets, call 6348-5555 Continues through late May 2005

Throughout September:  Concert. The Singapore Symphony Orchestra performs frequently at the Esplanade Concert Hall, 01 Esplanade Drive. For information, call 6338-1230. For tickets, call 6348-5555.  Continues through late December

 

October
Early October:  SeptFest. Singapore’s first contemporary arts center hosts cutting-edge theater and dance performances by international companies, art exhibits, concerts and other activities. The Substation, 45 Armenian St. For information, call 337-7535.  

Mid-Late October:  Theemidhi Festival. The highlight of this Hindu festival is watching devotees walk barefoot across a pit of hot embers. Daylong festivities. Sri Mariamman Temple, 244 S. Bridge Road. 

8-31 October:  Hari Raya Puasa Light-up. Muslim festival of lights held in the streets of the Geylang Serai district, known for its large and culturally active Malay community. 

Mid-late Oct:  Ramadan. Muslims observe a month of daylight fasting, and prayers are offered at mosques each evening. 

Late October:  Deepavali Light-Up. Celebrations of the Hindu Festival of Light, with fairy lights, garlands and illuminated arches, take place along Serangoon Road and at temples (including Sri Veerama Kaliamman, Sri Vadapathira Kaliamman and Sri Srinivasa Perumal). Special foods and delicacies are for sale at the Deepavali Festival Village on Campbell Lane in Little India. Continues through late November 

Throughout October:  Concert. The Singapore Symphony Orchestra performs frequently at the Esplanade Concert Hall, 01 Esplanade Drive. For information, call 6338-1230. For tickets, call 6348-5555. 

Throughout October:  Concert. The Singapore Chinese Orchestra performs frequent concerts of traditional Chinese music. Singapore Conference Hall, 7 Shenton Way. For information, call 6440-3839. For tickets, call 6348-5555.

 

November


Early-Mid November:  Singapore Triatholon. Part of the Asia Cup series, this world-class, grueling athletic event requires competitors to swim 1 mi/1.5 km in the open sea, bike 25 mi/40 km and run 6.5 mi/10 km. Also other events geared toward different levels of ability. For information, call 6340-9631. 

Mid November:  Ramadan. Muslims observe a month of daylight fasting, and prayers are offered at mosques each evening. 

1-21 November:  Hari Raya Puasa Light-up. Muslim festival of lights held in the streets of the Geylang Serai district.  

11 November :  Deepavali. Public holiday. Little India celebrates with lights, decorations and cultural performances along Serangoon Road and Campbell Lane. 

14 November :  Hari Raya Puasa. Public holiday. This major Muslim holiday marks the end of Ramadan. 

Mid November :  Cheers Badminton Open. This World Grand Prix tournament circuit event draws top badminton players from more than 20 countries to compete for US$170,000. Singapore Indoor Stadium. For information, call 6344-1773. 

Late November :  Singapore River Regatta. More than 100 local dragon-boat teams compete in this race on the Singapore River. For information, call the Singapore Dragon Boat Association at 6440-9763. 

Mid-Late November:  Singapore River Buskers’ Festival. More than 800 shows by local and international street performers, as well as a buskers’ parade on the opening night of the festival. See actors, comedians, contortionists, magicians, mimes, sword swallowers, jugglers, escape artists and acrobats along the Singapore River Promenade, Orchard Road and Marina Bay. For information, call 6250-7977.


Mid-Late November:  Christmas Light-Up. The Orchard Road shopping district is transformed into a fairyland of lights. Hotels and shops vie for Best Decorated Building honors. For information, call 6736-6622. Continues through early January

Throughout November:  Deepavali Light-Up. Celebrations of the Hindu Festival of Light, with fairy lights, garlands and illuminated arches, take place along Serangoon Road and at temples (including Sri Veerama Kaliamman, Sri Vadapathira Kaliamman and Sri Srinivasa Perumal). Special foods and delicacies are for sale at the Deepavali Festival Village on Campbell Lane in Little India. Concludes late November.

Throughout November:  Concert. The Singapore Chinese Orchestra performs frequent concerts of traditional Chinese music. Singapore Conference Hall, 7 Shenton Way. For information, call 6440-3839. For tickets, call 6348-5555

Throughout November:  Concert. The Singapore Symphony Orchestra performs frequently at the Esplanade Concert Hall, 01 Esplanade Drive. For information, call 6338-1230. For tickets, call 6348-5555.  Continues through late December

 

December


Early December :  Singapore International Marathon. This annual event features a full marathon, half-marathon, 10K run and minimarathon. The full marathon route begins at the National Stadium, 15 Stadium Road, and ends at the Padang. For information, call 6340 9609.

Throughout December:  Christmas Light-Up. The Orchard Road shopping district is transformed with lights. Hotels and shops vie for Best Decorated Building honors. For information, call 6736-6622. Continues through early January

 

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